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VISITORS 

Visitors are welcome at Mary Washington College, and pro- 
vision usually can be made, when the College is in session, to 
guide them through the buildings and grounds. 

A personal interview is not ordinarily required for admission. 
However, when planning to visit the College, an applicant should 
make an appointment well in advance. 



Mary Washington College Bulletin, Catalogue Issue, Volume 1, 
Number 6 May, 1970. Published monthly except August and 
November by Mary Washington College, Fredericksburg, Virginia, 
22401. Second Class Postage Paid at the Post Office, Fredericks- 
burg, Virginia. 



Table of Contents 



Calendar 

General Information 

Admissions 

Finances 

Student Life 

Academic Information 

Program of Studies 

Course Offerings 

Directory 



4 
5 
17 
29 
41 
57 
71 
97 
183 



TABLE OF 
CONTENTS 



COLLEGE CALENDAR 

Summer Session 1970 

Residence halls open June 14 

Registration J une 1 5 

Classes begin I une 1 6 

Holiday J uly 6 

Reading Day A ugust 5 

Final examinations August 6, 7, 8 

Session 1970-1971 

First Semester 

Residence hall open for new students Saturday, September 12 

Residence halls open for 

returning students Sunday, September 13 

Freshman orientation assembly Monday, September 14 

Registration of returning 

students, Science Hall Tuesday, September 15 

Registration of new students including transfer 

students, Science Hall Wednesday, September 16 

Classes begin Thursday, September 17 

CALENDAR Chancellor's Convocation and Awarding of Intermediate 

Honors Thursday , September 1 7 

Mid-semester reports due Friday, November 6 

Thanksgiving holidays begin 2:05 p.m., Wednesday, November 25 

Class work resumed 8:00 a.m., Monday, November 30 

Christmas holidays begin 5:30 p.m., Friday, December 18 

Class work resumed 8:00 a.m., Monday, January 4 

Reading Days Monday and Tuesday, January 18, 19 

Mid-year examinations January 20-29 

Second Semester 

Registration of new students, 

George Washington Hall Saturday, February 6 

Classes begin Monday, February 8 

Mid-semester reports due Wednesday, March 24 

Spring holidays begin 5:30 p.m., Friday, March 26 

Class work resumed 8:00 a.m., Monday, April 5 

Reading Days May 19, 20 

Final examinations May 21 to June 1 

Graduating exercises Sunday, June 6 

Summer Session 1971 

Dates to be Announced 



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Introduction 

Mary Washington College is a state-aided liberal arts college 
and a part of the University of Virginia. As such, it has an 
obligation to the people of the Commonwealth of Virginia to 
provide, without regard to race, creed or national origins, the 
best education it can for those students who give promise of 
succeeding in college. 

As a liberal arts college, Mary Washington stands firmly in 
the conviction that a broad education in the arts, the sciences, 
and the humanities, complemented by intensive study in a particular 
field of interest, is a most appropriate preparation for life and 
citizenship. 

Mary Washington endeavors to provide the best intellectual 
background possible for the student of today. It recognizes the 
importance of the inquiring mind, the significance of aesthetic 
sensibility and the necessity of individual and corporate re- 
sponsibility. 

Finally, as a part of the University of Virginia, Mary Washing- 
ton College has a unique role to fill in Virginia education, and 
is pledged to the selection of a qualified student body, to the 
maintenance of a competent faculty and staff, and to the develop- 
ment of the academic and social environment necessary to achieve 
its goals. 




GENERAL 
INFORMATION 



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GENERAL 
INFORMATION 



Mary Washington college is accredited by the Southern Associa- 
tion of Colleges and Secondary Schools. It is a member of the 
Southern University Conference, the American Council on Educa- 
tion, the Association of American Colleges, the Association of 
Virginia Colleges, the College Entrance Examination Board, the 
National Commission on Accrediting, the Southern Association of 
Colleges for Women, the University Center in Virginia, and the 
National Association of Schools of Music. 

Mary Washington College is a corporate member of the Ameri- 
can Association of University Women, which is affiliated with the 
International Federation of University Women (IFUW). Graduates 
are eligible for membership in the national and international 
organizations. There is a local branch of the A AUW in Fredericks- 
burg. 

The Mary Washington College faculty members who are members 
of Phi Beta Kappa, the nation's oldest scholastic fraternity, have 
been invited by that organization to submit apetition for a chapter 
charter to the Council of Phi Beta Kappa at the triennial meeting 
in September 1970. TheCommittee on Qualifications and the Senate 
of Phi Beta Kappa have indicated that they will recommend favorable 
consideration for this petition. 



History 

Founded as the Fredericksburg Normal and Industrial School 
for Women in 1908, Mary Washington College has experienced 
a growth closely paralleling the development of education for 
women in the State of Virginia. The coordination of the College 
with the University of Virginia was the culmination of efforts 
by the women of Virginia to gain educational opportunities 
comparable to those provided by the State for men. 



By the beginning of this century the Virginia General Assembly 
began a move to provide a more adequate education for the 
young women in the state. This resulted in the establishment of 
two normal schools, one in Fredericksburg and the other in 
Harrisonburg. In 1909 the State made an appropriation of $25,000 
for the purchase of land in or near Fredericksburg. A sixty-acre 
site on Marye's Heights overlooking the city was subsequently 
chosen. By 1924 the normal school had developed beyond its 
original mission and as a result of action by the General Assembly, 
the College then became the State Teachers' College, Fredericks- 
burg. 

The curriculum was divided into a two-year and four-year 
program. Those students successfully completing the four-year 
program received a B.S. degree in education plus the regular 
state collegiate professional certificate, while those completing the 
two-year program earned a normal professional or special teacher' s 
certificate. 

A further change occurred in 1935 when, in recognition of the 
necessity for providing a balanced education for women that was 
not oriented solely toward the teaching profession, the College 
was given the additional privilege of conferring degrees in the 
liberal arts, as well as in the professional, vocational, and technical 
fields. From this point on, the College was in fact a state college 
for women. 

This shift in emphasis led in turn to the third change of name 
for the Fredericksburg institution— to Mary Washington College— 
by act of the General Assembly in 1938. 




GENERAL 
INFORMATION 




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GENERAL 
INFORMATION 




The fourth major change occurred in 1944 when a bill was 
brought before the state legislature to make Mary Washington 
College the undergraduate college of arts and sciences for women 
of the University of Virginia. 

With the establishment of Mary Washington College as the 
women's college of the University, emphasis was placed upon the 
liberal arts. Courses that were regarded as primarily vocational 
were either eliminated or continued on a non-credit basis. By 
1948 the initial transition was completed. 

Since that time, academic growth has continued. A number of 
changes have been implemented to emphasize further Mary Wash- 
ington College's role as a liberal arts college for women; as the 
needs for women in liberal arts have changed, so too has the 
College. 

One of the few state-aided liberal arts colleges for women in 
America, Mary Washington draws its students from many states 
and enrolls a number of students from foreign countries. 

The name— Mary Washington College— combines historic signific- 
ance and background with local associations. Within sight of the 
hill on which the College is located are the home and tomb of 
Mary Washington; and Kenmore, the home of her daughter, 
Betty Washington Lewis. The College grounds were at one time 
a part of the Lewis estate. 



Location and Environment 

The Mary Washington College campus, which also includes the 
historic Brompton estate, comprises 381 acres, the major part 
situated on Marye's Heights overlooking the city of Fredericks- 
burg and the Rappahannock Valley. Immediately adjacent to the 
Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania National Military Park, the 
grounds were the site of the Civil War Battle of Fredericksburg; 
long before that, it is said, a portion of the area was an Indian 
village. 

The City of Fredericksburg has now enveloped the College 
property, which has, however, remained an integral unit, un- 
broken by the urban development. Some thirty-three buildings are 
located on the campus and, in addition, there are a golf course, 
athletic fields and tennis courts, a new physical education building 
containing an Olympic-size swimming pool, and an outdoor 
amphitheatre. Though the buildings are widely situated on the 
wooded grounds, they are within easy walking distance of one 
another and not far from the downtown business district of 
Fredericksburg and other more recently constructed shopping 
centers. 



Fredericksburg is situated halfway between Washington, D.C. 
(55 miles), and Richmond, Virginia (55 miles), and is easily 
accessible from the north or south on Interstate Highway 95 or 
U.S. Route 1, or from the east or west on U.S. Route 17 or 
Virginia Route 3. Bus transportation (Greyhound or Trailways) 
and rail transportation (Richmond, Fredericksburg, and Potomac 
Railroad) are also readily accessible. The closest commercial 
airlines facilities are at the National Airport and Dulles Inter- 
national Airport, both serving Washington, D.C, and each an 
hour's ride from the College; or at Byrd Airport in Richmond, 
only slightly further away. 

Fredericksburg is a city of 15,000 with modern shopping and 
tourist facilities. There exists a very cordial relationship between 
the College and the community, and the students are a part of 
this relationship whether as shoppers, as part-time employees at 
local businesses, or as members of church congregations. 

The City and surrounding area have played an important role 
in American history from the time Captain John Smith and his 
followers sailed up the Rappahannock River in 1608 until the 
present. Sometimes called "America's Most Historic City," 
Fredericksburg is identified with much of the nation's earlier 
history. Americans such as Alexander Spotswood, George Wash- 
ington, James Monroe, James Madison, and John Paul Jones 
were closely associated with it, as were many other colonial 
history-makers. In addition, four major engagements of the Civil 
War were fought in the Fredericksburg area— all encompassing 
Marye's Heights where the College is located— and the reminders 
of America's heritage are still clearly present. 

Brompton, now a part of the College grounds and the residence 
of its Chancellor, was once headquarters for the Confederate 
forces defending the City and center of the Federal attack in 
both the first and second battles of Fredericksburg. Also located 
on the College grounds is a memorial to Confederate Sergeant 
Richard Kirkland of South Carolina, a hero of the Battle of 
Fredericksburg. The memorial was created by sculptor Felix de- 
Weldon and dedicated in 1965. 

Thousands of interested Americans and foreign visitors come 
to Fredericksburg each year to re-live history by touring these 
important landmarks. As an accomodation the City operates 
Information Centers on Interstate Highway 95 and at the corner 
of U.S. Route 1 and Princess Anne Street in the City. 




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GENERAL 
INFORMATION 




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GENERAL 
INFORMATION 



Buildings and Accommodations 

The architecture of Mary Washington College may best be 
described as neo-classical in the Jeffersonian tradition. The red 
brick, white-columned buildings have been situated in an orderly 
manner on the campus, utilizing as much as possible the existing 
natural surroundings. The thirty-three structures include eighteen 
residence halls and nine academic buildings. 

Academic Buildings 

Chandler Hall. Named in memory of Algernon B. Chandler, 
Jr., president of the College from 1919 until his death in 1928, 
this building contains offices, classrooms, seminar rooms, and 
laboratories for English, home economics, and psychology. 
Combs Science Hall. This modern, four-story science complex 
honors the late Morgan L. Combs, President of the College from 
1929 to 1955. It provides lecture rooms, offices, laboratories, 
and other facilities for instruction in astronomy, biology, chemistry, 
geography, geology, mathematics, and physics. It has adequate 
space to make possible continued expansion of course offerings 
in these fields. A botanical greenhouse addition is currently being 
planned and is scheduled for use during the 1970-71 school 
session. 

Fine Arts Center. The Fine Arts Center contains three separate 
buildings connected by arcades: Jessie Ball duPont Hall, Gari 
Melchers Hall, and John Garland Pollard Hall. 




duPont Hall. The central building of the group constituting the 
fine arts complex is named in honor of Jessie Ball (Mrs. Alfred 
I.) duPont of Wilmington, Delaware, and Ditchley, Virginia, 
in recognition of her interest and generosity to the College and 
of the fact that she is a close lineal descendant of Mary Ball 
Washington for whom the College is named. This central unit 
contains exhibit rooms, classrooms, a broadcasting studio, and 
language laboratories. It also houses a theatre with a seating 
capacity of 300, rehearsal rooms, make-up rooms, and a scenery 
loft. Classes in dramatic arts and speech and modern foreign 
languages use these facilities. 

Melchers Hall. The south building of the complex is named 
in honor of the late Gari Melchers, internationally known artist, 
whose home, Belmont, in nearby Falmouth, is now a memorial 
under the trusteeship of the College. Melchers Hall is devoted to 
such arts as painting, sculpture, printmaking, and ceramics, and 
contains art history classrooms, studios, kilns, offices, and work- 
rooms. Housed here also is the fast-growing and carefully selected 
slide library for use in the art history classes. 
Pollard Hall. The north building, bearing the name of the late 
John Garland Pollard, Governor of Virginia, Attorney-General, 
college professor, and patron of the arts, is devoted exclusively to 
music. It contains classrooms, studios for individual instruction, 
band practice rooms, and offices. 

Monroe Hall. This structure was named for President James 
Monroe, who lived in Fredericksburg and whose life was closely 
identified with the community. It contains classrooms and offices 
for the departments of classics, economics and political science, 
education, history, and religion. It has an assembly hall with a 
seating capacity of about 200. 



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GENERAL 
INFORMATION 




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GENERAL 
INFORMATION 



E. Lee Trinkle Library. Named in honor of the late E. Lee 
Trinkle, former Governor of Virginia and for many years President 
of the State Board of Education, once the governing board of the 
College, the library contains more than 200,000 volumes. 

It is a large air-conditioned facility and provides ample study 
and reading space. An open stack system permits students to 
browse and to work directly with the book collection. Typing 
rooms, individual study cubicles, microfilm readers, coin-operated 
xerox facilities, and a hook-up on a state-wide library teletype 
system for inter-library lending are a few of the services and 
facilities available. 

In an effort to maintain accurate and up-to-date material for 
classroom and research purposes the library subscribes to and 
catalogues nearly 1,000 periodicals and newspapers. This list in- 
cludes 132 foreign and 710 domestic periodicals and 7 foreign 
and 21 domestic newspapers. 

In addition, the library is a depository for other selected govern- 
ment documents; it maintains a record collection as well as a 
music manuscript collection. 

In 1964, the library opened a rare books room which provides 
ready access to a growing collection of first editions and books 
of particular rarity. Special attention is currently being given to 
books by and about James Joyce and the nineteenth century 
French physiologist, Claude Bernard, as well as to books on 
eighteenth centruy architecture, landscaping and gardening. 
George Washington Hall. This facility is named in honor of 
George Washington, whose life was closely connected with 
Fredericksburg and this section of Virginia. It contains the ad- 
ministrative offices, classroom and office facilities for the philosophy 
department, the telephone exchange for the College, the internal 
mail facility and central duplication services for the College. 
It also contains the largest auditorium on the campus with a 
seating capacity of more than 1 ,600. 

Goolrick Hall. The newest building on the campus has been 
named for the late C. O' Conor Goolrick, who, as a member of 
the General Assembly of Virginia, sponsored the 1908 legislation 
establishing the College. It contains all the facilities and equipment 
necessary for a complete physical education program. There are, 
for example, an indoor swimming pool, a large gymnasium and 
auxiliary gym, a handball court, dance studios, sun decks, and 
an exercise room. In addition several academic departments 
share offices and classrooms in the building. 



Other Buildings 

Brompton. Brompton is the home of the Chancellor of the 
College and is situated on a 174-acre site near the main campus. 
The first unit of the colonial brick mansion is believed to have 
been erected about 1730. It was enlarged and completed in 1836 
by Colonel John L. Marye and restored, after purchase by the 
College, in 1946. 

In a report by historians for the Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania 
National Military Park, it is stated that "no other house on the 
American continent is more important or better known in con- 
nection with military history, and few other homes are better 
examples of their type". 

Also located on this tract of land, which comprises the major 
portion of the original estate, is the College's nine-hole golf course. 
Belmont. Located in Falmouth across the Rappahannock River 
from Fredericksburg, Belmont is the estate where Gari Melchers, 
the noted American artist, lived and worked during the last 
sixteen years of his distinguished career. As a memorial to her 
husband, Mrs. Corinne Lawton Mackall Melchers deeded Belmont 
and many of his paintings to the Commonwealth of Virginia. 
The property is now administered by Mary Washington College. 
Many of the Melchers paintings may be seen in the College 
offices and other buildings. 

Anne Fairfax. Named in memory of the wife of George Washing- 
ton's half-brother, Lawrence, this white frame structure faces Col- 
lege Avenue. 

Ann Carter Lee Hall. Popularly known as the "Student Activities" 
building, this structure bears the name of the mother of Robert 
E. Lee. It provides such recreational areas as a ballroom, recep- 
tion rooms, television facilities, informal lounges, the College 
bookstore, and the" CShoppe," a campus snack bar. Located here 
is the office of the Director of Student Affairs, as are the offices 
of the major student organizations. 

Hugh Mercer Infirmary. Named for Dr. Hugh Mercer, a physician 
of Fredericksburg and a brigadier-general in the Revolutionary 
War, the infirmary is a modern, thirty-seven bed medical facility. 
Every room is provided with private or connecting bath. There 
are also isolation wards, a solarium, a sun deck, a dining room 
and kitchen. 

It is maintained on a twenty-four hour a day basis by a staff 
of nurses, and a staff of physicians residing in the community 
are available at all times. 



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GENERAL 
INFORMATION 



Seacobeck Hall. A Seacobeck Indian village once occupied the 
present site of the campus dining hall. It has a central kitchen, 
five main dining areas, and a reception room. It also is equipped 
with its own bakery, ice plant and storage facilities. 
Spotswood House. Originally built as a home and used for a 
time as a small residence hall, this frame building located opposite 
the main entrance to the College is now occupied by the Alumnae 
Association. Alexander Spotswood was a colonial governor of Vir- 
ginia. 

Amphitheatre. The outdoor amphitheatre is set on the slope of 
a hill in a natural grove of trees and has a seating capacity of 
approximately 1 ,500. It is the site of the annual May Festival at 
the College. 

Post Office. College Station, a branch of the Fredericksburg 
Post Office, is located on College Avenue, across the street from 
the main campus, and provides individual mail boxes for students 
in addition to other postal services. 



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GENERAL 
INFORMATION 









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Residence Halls 

The eighteen (13 major and 5 minor) residence halls on campus 
are for the most part centrally located and close to the academic 
buildings. All of them provide comfortable housing with ample 
ventilation and light. The major halls accommodate from 50 to 
180 students, while the minor halls normally house from 15 to 
20 students. These smaller facilities serve as special purpose dormi- 
tories, such as language houses, and one of them is the residence 
of the student government president and three other student officials. 

Many of the halls are arranged in suites with connecting baths, 
while the newer structures employ a "unit complex" concept in 
which small groups of students reside in two-student rooms and 
share common facilities somewhat as they would do at home. 

All of the major residence halls have reception rooms, recrea- 
tion areas, kitchenettes, washers and driers, and pressing rooms. 
Each hall is also equipped with a color television set, usually 
located in the recreation area, which will receive educational as 
well as commercial network programs. Students may bring their 
own sets if they desire, but external antennas are not available. 

Students admitted to the College as freshmen are assigned a 
room in one of four predominantly freshman residence halls on 
the campus. Returning students select their roommate and room 
during the preceding school session. 




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Admission Requirements 

The general requirements for admission to Mary Washington 
College are as follows: 

Scholastic Preparation. 

The general academic requirements for admission are graduation 
from an accredited* high school or preparatory school, and credit 
for at least sixteen acceptable entrance units.** 

The sixteen academic units must include the following: English 
(four units), college preparatory mathematics (three units selected 
from algebra, geometry, trigonometry and calculus, or a combina- 
tion of these courses), foreign language (two units in the same 
language), social studies (one unit), and science (one unit). The 
remaining units should consist of additional academic units, but 
no credit is allowed for less than two units in a foreign language. 

A student attending a five-year school or one who begins tradi- 
tional secondary school subjects in the eighth grade must complete 
eighteen academic units in order to meet the minimum require- 
ments for admission. In any case, eleven of the units must be 
distributed as outlined in the preceding paragraph. 

Examinations 

An applicant is required to take the Scholastic Aptitude Test; 
the achievement tests in English composition and in a foreign 
language, preferably the language to be continued in college; and 
an achievement test in a field in which the student wishes to 
demonstrate special aptitude or proficiency. 

The tests normally should be taken in December or January 
of the senior year. Under no circumstances can a test date later 
than the January administration of the senior year be used for 
purposes of admission in September. Candidates for enrollment in 
February must complete the tests no later than the December test- 
ing. A student may submit the results of tests taken prior to the 
senior year if the scores are comparable to the average maintained 
by entering students at Mary Washington College. 



* A school which is accredited by the state or a regional accredit- 
ing agency. 

**An entrance unit represents a year's successful study of a subject 
in a high school or preparatory school, the class meeting five 
times a week. 



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ADMISSIONS 





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ADMISSIONS 



Information about the tests may be obtained from the College 
Entrance Examination Board, Box 592, Princeton, N. J., or from 
secondary school counselors. In applying for the tests the applicant 
should specify that the results be sent to Mary Washington College. 

Applicants who are at least twenty-one years of age may be 
admitted as special students, provided they give evidence of serious 
purpose and show adequate preparation for a liberal arts program. 
An applicant for special student status should submit the results 
of the Scholastic Aptitude Test but normally achievement test 
results are not required. All other applicants must meet the 
quantitative requirements outlined above. 

Character, Personality and Interests 

A recommendation by an appropriate secondary school official, 
including information about the student's character, interests, 
attitudes, and habits as a member of the school community, is 
required. The school officials are also required to make an assess- 
ment of the applicant's academic promise. Provision for this 
information is made on the reverse side of the transcript form. 
Activities that reflect leadership or intellectual interests are im- 
pressive only if they reinforce sound academic achievement. Since 
Mary Washington operates under a successful honor system, 
assurance of personal integrity is indispensable. 



Health 

Each student before entering the College is required to present 
a certificate from a physician indicating the results of a recent 
physical examination. If this examination reveals the need for 




further information pertinent to the health and welfare of the 
student, such information should be included with the certificate. 
An up-to-date physical examination is required for each session 
a student attends the College. Although every effort is made to 
mail forms for completing this examination to all readmission 
students as well as freshman and transfer students, it is the responsi- 
bility of the individual student to see that the examination is under- 
taken and the results reported to the College on the appropriate 
form. Normally this form is mailed directly to the student around 
Julyl. 

Committee Review 

The Committee on Admissions examines each application for 
evidence of qualifications appropriate to the purpose of the College 
and approves applicants— including those wishing to enter the five 
cooperative professional programs for which Mary Washington 
provides the liberal arts base— only if they seem prepared to succeed 
in a competitive, liberal curriculum. 

In attempting to judge which applicants are most likely to 
succeed in competition with their fellow students, the Committee 
considers many factors. Among them are academic achievement, 
class rank, aptitude and achievement test results, a pattern of 
courses demonstrating interest and competence in the liberal arts 
and sciences, and secondary school recommendations. 

The Committee feels that the senior year is extremely important, 
and such basic academic subjects as English, mathematics, labora- 
tory sciences, and foreign language, particularly the latter, should 
be continued through the final term. 




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ADMISSIONS 




Directions for Application 

Students interested in applying should request all necessary forms 
from the Director of Admissions early in the first semester of their 
senior year. An application for admission will be mailed to the 
student together with a secondary school transcript form. The 
application should be completed and signed by the applicant and 
a parent or guardian and returned directly to the College, 
preferably during the first semester of the senior year although 
March 1 is the deadline. The transcript blank should be completed 
by the appropriate official of the school from which the applicant 
has been graduated or expects to be graduated and returned to the 
Director of Admissions. Included on the transcript form should be 
a list of subjects the student is, or plans, to undertake during 
his senior year. 

A non-refundable fee of ten dollars (read carefully, Application 
Fee, page 33) must accompany the application. No applicant 
will be considered by the Committee on Admissions until these 
forms, the appropriate test scores, and the fee have been received. 

The Committee on Admissions will make a preliminary evaluation 
2j of this material and will make a final decision upon receipt of 

the first semester grades and the results of the required College 

ADMISSIONS Board examinations. 

If the student's record is approved and living facilities are 
available, he will be notified of acceptance, usually by April 1. 
Acceptance is for a specific session of the College. If the student 
does not enroll then, a new application must be filed. 

Upon notification of acceptance, the student is requested to 
submit a one hundred dollar room deposit within two weeks of 
the date of the acceptance letter. This money will be applied to 
the first semester charges and it is refundable upon request until 
May 1 or until January 1 if for admission of the second semester. 

Early Decision Plan 

A candidate who selects Mary Washington College as a first 
choice may wish to apply for admission under the first choice 
early decision plan. This plan requires that the candidate certify on 
the appropriate form that Mary Washington is his first choice 
college and that he will accept an offer of admission if it is 
extended by the Committee on Admissions. The candidate may 
wish to initiate applications to other colleges should this seem 
advisable but he must agree to withdraw such applications when 
notified of acceptance by Mary Washington College. 



A candidate who applies under these terms should request the 
Early Decision form together with the regular Application for 
Admission. These forms should be completed and returned, together 
with a secondary school transcript form, prior to November 1 
of the applicant's senior year in secondary school. The results 
of the Scholastic Aptitude Test and the three achievement tests 
should be submitted also to the College prior to November 1. 

The Committee on Admissions will act on the early decision 
requests and will notify candidates by December 1 of the admissions 
decision. Upon notification of acceptance, the candidate must 
submit a statement accepting the early offer of admission and 
certifying that any other applications have been cancelled. The 
statement must be accompanied by a one hundred dollar non- 
refundable room deposit, which is credited to the student's account 
for the first semester. 

The Committee on Admissions will offer early decisions to a 
maximum of one hundred candidates. Should the Committee not 
act favorably on an early decision request, the applicant's file 
will remain active and the Committee will reconsider it after 
additional grades and/ or scores are submitted by the candidate 
at the end of his seventh semester in secondary school. 

Candidates for early decision who also seek financial aid should 
submit the Parents' Confidential Statement prior to November 
1. These requests will be acted upon and the students notified 
of awards prior to December 1. 



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ADMISSIONS 





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ADMISSIONS 



The Advanced Placement and the College- Level 
Examination Programs 

A student who has completed one or more college-level courses 
while still attending a secondary school may receive college 
credit for this work at Mary Washington College. Those who desire 
to qualify for consideration of credit should take the appropriate 
examination in the Advanced Placement Program of the College 
Entrance Examination Board and have the results forwarded to the 
College. The examinations are offered in the third week of May 
and are provided in American History, Biology, Chemistry, Eng- 
lish, French, European History, German, Latin, Mathematics, 
Physics and Spanish. 

In addition the College participates in the College-Level Examina- 
tion Program, also administered by the College Entrance Examina- 
tion Board. A student may take one or more of the Subject 
Examinations in the series and apply for college credit. Acceptance 
of examination scores in lieu of course work is determined by the 
Dean and the individual departments concerned. 

These examinations may not be substituted for Advanced Place- 
ment examinations, but are intended for demonstrating subject 
matter competency which has been achieved outside of a formally 
structured and administered academic program. 

Further information about either the Advanced Placement 
Examination Program or the College-Level Examination Program 
may be secured from the College Entrance Examination Board, 
Box 592, Princeton, New Jersey 08540. 




Directions for Readmission 

A student attending the College who expects to return the follow- 
ing session must file an application for readmission. The form is 
mailed to the student in December and must be returned by March 
1 with a ten-dollar application fee and a fifty-dollar advance 
payment. Any student whose completed application form and fees 
are received after March 1 must be placed on a waiting list for 
residential accommodations; the College cannot assure these stu- 
dents that space will be available for the following session. 

The ten-dollar fee is non-refundable; the fifty-dollar advance 
payment, which is applied to the student's account for the 
following session, is not refundable after May 1 unless the student 
is academically or residentially ineligible to return, or except in 
very unusual circumstances, based on the merits of the case as 
determined by the Comptroller and the Director of Admissions. 

Readmission is approved for the session immediately following. 
If a student does not return at this time a subsequent application 
for readmission will be treated as a new application for admission. 

A student who has withdrawn from the College or is suspended 
for other than academic reasons, is not automatically readmitted 
but must make application. If another institution has been 
attended, the work there as well as that done at Mary Washington 
College will be taken into consideration by the Committee on 
Admissions. 



25 



ADMISSIONS 



Although the College makes every effort to furnish read- 
mission applications directly to enrolled students, it is the re- 
sponsibility of the individual student to see that the above regula- 
tions are met. Application forms may be obtained from the 
Director of Admissions. 

Admission by Advanced Standing 

Admission Requirements 

For admission with advanced standing the applicant must satisfy 
the general requirements for admission (See pp 19) and in addition 
meet the following standards: 

An applicant should have earned approximately a "B" average 
in all college-level work. A student may be considered only if 
entitled to honorable dismissal without academic or residential 
probation in the last institution attended; and must have received 
the recommendation of the dean, director, or other authorized 
administrative officer of the current college attended. 

An applicant must satisfy the secondary school entrance re- 
quirements at Mary Washington College, using advanced credits 

_ for this purpose if necessary. 

ADMISSIONS ^ candidate must submit the results of the Scholastic Aptitude 

Test. Normally, achievement tests are not required, but the 
Committee may request a student to take specific examinations. 

Residence Requirements 

A student must be enrolled at Mary Washington College at 
least four semesters, including the last semester, to be eligible 
for a degree. 

A candidate for a degree must earn at least eighteen hours of 
the major subject at Mary Washington College. 

Students wishing to enroll in one of the cooperative programs, 
such as those in medical technology and speech pathology, must 
be enrolled at Mary Washington College at least four semesters. 
No transfer students are accepted for the cooperative program 
in nursing. 

Directions for Application 

Upon request, the Director of Admissions will send an ap- 
plication for admission, a secondary school transcript form, and 
an Inter-College Confidential Form. The application, signed by the 
applicant and parent or guardian, should be sent to the College. 



The transcript blank should be completed by the appropriate 
official of the secondary school from which the applicant was 
graduated and returned directly to the Director of Admissions. 

Information requested on the Inter-College Confidential Form 
should be provided by the Dean of Students or other appropriate 
official at the applicant's current college. The applicant should 
request that this, as well as a complete transcript of all course 
work attempted to date, be forwarded to the Director of Ad- 
missions here. 

Applicants are urged to submit a transcript, Inter-College Con- 
fidential Form, and a personal application early in the first semester 
of the year prior to transferring. The Committee on Admissions 
will make a preliminary evaluation of this material and will make 
a final decision upon receipt of the first semester or second 
quarter grades. 

If the applicant's record is approved by the Committee on Ad- 
missions and living facilities are available, the applicant will be 
notified of acceptance, usually by April 1. Upon notification of 
acceptance, the student is requested to submit within two weeks 
a one hundred dollar room deposit. This money will be credited 
to the first semester charges and is refundable upon request 27 

until May 1. Acceptance is for a specific session of the College. 

If the student does not enroll then, a new application must be ADMISSIONS 

filed. 

An application fee of ten dollars (read carefully, Application 
Fee, Page 33) should be sent to the Director of Admissions by 
the applicant. No applicant will be considered for enrollment by 
the Committee on Admissions until the completed application, 
all other forms, and the fee has been received. 




Transfer of Credits. 

The College will accept credit for work completed at other 
institutions under the following conditions: 
For Transfer Students Admitted With Advanced Stand- 
ing. 

The evaluation and allowance of credits will be provisional 
until the student has completed one semester's work at Mary 
Washington, after which transfer credits may be subject to 
re-evaluation. Credit is allowed only for courses equivalent 
to courses offered at Mary Washington and only for courses 
which the student has completed with a grade of "C" or better. 
Transfer students must earn a "C" average or better on all work 
taken at Mary Washington and in courses in their major subject. 
Transfer credits do not affect a student's quality point standing 
one way or another. 

For Students Transferring Credits From Other Branches 
of the University of Virginia. 

Quality points will be recorded as earned, but may not be used 
28 to earn special academic honors or to improve a student's academic 

~ standing. 
ADMISSIONS f or students Already Enrolled At Mary Washington 

College. 

A student wishing to earn credits at another institution, either 
in the summer or during a regular session, must obtain permission 
in writing to do so from the Office of the Dean. Credit for 
courses taken elsewhere will be allowed according to the regula- 
tions stated above. 

Correspondence courses are not credited toward a degree. 
Extension classes may be taken for credit only with permission 
of the Dean and the chairman of the department concerned , and 
under no circumstances may more than thirty hours of extension 
course credit be counted toward a degree. 




Semester Fees And Expenses 

Students Living in Residence Halls 



VIRGINIA 
STUDENTS 



NON-VIRGINIA 
STUDENTS 



Tuition $ None 

General college fees $ 600 

Student activity fee 27 

Residential fee 398 

Board 385 

Total-Session of Nine Months. $1410 

Semester Charge Payable 

September 1 and February 1 — $ 705 

Full- Time Day Students 

VIRGINIA 
STUDENTS 



$ 700 

600 

27 

398 

385 

$2110 

$1055 



NON-VIRGINIA 
STUDENTS 



31 



Tuition $ None $ 700 

General college fees $ 600 600 

Student activity fee 27 27 

Total— Session of Nine Months... 627 $1327 

Semester Charge Payable 

September 1 and February 1 $313.50 $ 663.50 

The fees itemized above are subject to change. 
Off- Campus Teacher Training 

Students participating in the Off-Campus Teacher Training 
Program should contact the Comptroller to discuss the applicable 
fees for this semester of teacher training. 

Contingent Fee 

A contingent fee of $10.00 is charged all full-time students and 
may not be deducted from the charges due on admission to the 
College. Students will be held responsible for the care and preserva- 
tion of College property and, as far as possible, all damage to 
buildings and equipment will be repaired at the expense of stu- 
dents causing such damage. At the end of the session, the whole 
or such part of the contingent fee as may be due the student will 
be returned. 



FINANCES 



Part- Time Students 

The minimum charge for a part-time program (1 to 3 hours' 
credit) is $70.00 per semester. For each semester hour of credit 
over three, there is an additional charge of $23. 00 per credit hour. 
A student who is not a legal resident of the State of Virginia 
will be charged a non-resident tuition fee of $28.00 per semester 
hour of credit in addition to the above charges. 

In addition to the fees above, students enrolling only for 
courses with individual instruction in music or art will be charged 
an additional $50.00 for each such course. 

No student will be admitted on a part-time basis who registers 
for more than ten semester hours of credit. Part-time students are 
not entitled to laundry, infirmary or dining hall services; neither 
are they entitled to free admission to those events covered by the 
Student Activity Fee. 

No student may reside on campus who is enrolled as a part- 
time student. 

Students enrolled for classes for no credit will be charged at 
the same rate as those enrolled for credit. 
32 Students who live off campus can make provisions to take 

meals in the dining hall by notifying the Office of the Comptroller. 

FINANCES The dining hall charges will be billed on a semester basis. Off 

campus students must pay the full board charge as specified on 
page 31. The meal charge cannot be prorated to include only 
one or two meals per day. 

Classification as a Virginia Student 

Title 23, Sec. 7 of the 1950 Code of Virginia states: "No 
person shall be entitled to the admission privileges, or the reduced 
tuition charges, or any other privileges accorded by law only to 
residents or citizens of Virginia, in the State institutions of higher 
learning unless such person has been domiciled in and is and has 
been an actual bona fide resident of Virginia for a period of at 
least one year prior to the commencement of the term, semester 
or quarter for which any such privilege or reduced tuition charge 
is sought, provided that the governing boards of such institutions 
may require longer periods of residence and may set up additional 
requirements for admitting students." 

Classification as a Virginia student, as defined by The Rector 
and Board of Visitors, is as follows: 



In order to be considered a Virginia student for any given 
semester, it is necessary that the applicant, who takes the legal 
residence of her father, shall have been domiciled in the State 
of Virginia for at least one year immediately preceding the beginning 
of that semester, and that the applicant's father must have been 
a bona fide taxpayer (paying income taxes on the father's total 
income) to the State of Virginia for the calendar year immediately 
preceding the calendar year of registration. 

A student who is twenty-one (21) years of age must show 
evidence that she has established residence, and that she has 
declared herself a legal resident of the State of Virginia. 

For tuition purposes, the married student takes the legal resi- 
dence of her husband unless she has shown evidence of establishing 
her legal residence as different from that of her husband. 

Residence in the State for the purpose of securing an education 
does not qualify an individual for classification as a Virginia stu- 
dent. 



Application Fee 

An application fee of $10.00 must accompany every application 
for admission, both from new students and from upperclassmen 
applying for read mission. No admission will be acted upon by 
the Committee on Admissions until this fee has been received. 

This application fee of $10.00 is to be paid by every new 
student whether she lives on or off the campus. It is a payment 
entirely separate from other fees and cannot be deducted from 
charges due on entrance to the College. THIS FEE IS NOT 
REFUNDABLE, but is applied to the cost of processing the 
application for admission. 

Since residence accommodations are limited , making it necessary 
to deny admission to many applicants each year, it is advisable 
to comply with the requirements for admission (see Directions 
for Application, page 22) as far in advance of the opening of the 
session as is practicable. 

Terms of Payment 

All fees, room rent, and board are payable in advance by the 
semester. 

Statements for students' fees and expenses for the first semester 
will be mailed the later part of August and the later part of 
December for the second semester. Payment in full is due for 
the first semester by September 1 and by February 1 for the second 
semester. Scholarships and loans are applied one-half to each 
semester. This credit should appear on the statement mailed by 
the College. 



33 



FINANCES 





Any variations from the terms of payment must be approved in 
writing by the Comptroller prior to the payment dates listed 
above. If student accounts are not paid in full by the required 
date, the account will be subject to a$10.00 late payment penalty. 

Failure to meet payments when due or to make other satisfactory 
arrangements may result in suspension of the student from College 
until the account is brought up to date. 

Remittance should be made to Mary Washington College and 
sent to the Comptroller. 

New Students 

After notification of acceptance from the Director of Admissions, 
a payment of $100.00 is required. No student will be assigned a 
residence hall room until the payment of $100.00 has been re- 
ceived. This payment is not refundable after May 1, but is applied 
toward the fees for the session immediately following. Exceptions 
to this policy will be made only in the most unusual circum- 
stances, based on the merits of the case as determined by the 
Comptroller and the Director of Admissions. 



34 



FINANCES 



Returning Students 

All students applying for readmission are required to make a $50.00 
advance payment by March 1. This payment is not refundable 
after May 1, except in unusual circumstances, based on the merits 
of the case as determined by the Comptroller. 



Refund of Fees 

Students who withdraw from the College during the semester 
will be charged in accordance with the following schedule: 



Withdrawal 
During Semester 

1-15 days 
15 days— middle of 
semester 



General 
College Fees 

$75.00 
One-half semester 
charge 



Tuition 

$85.00 
One-half semester 
charge 
No refund 



After middle of semester No refund 

After the middle of a semester, no refund of general college 
fees or tuition will be made except in case of personal illness 
and upon recommendation of the College or family physician. 

Residential fee: Except in the first 15 days of the semester, 
no refund of this fee will be made. 

Board: For the purpose of calculating refunds, board will be 
charged at a rate of $1.50 per day for each day in residence. 



Credit 

No credit will be awarded, diploma granted, or transcript of 
credits furnished a student until all financial obligations to the 
College, other than student loans, have been paid or secured by 
other financial arrangements. 

All previously incurred expenses at the College must be paid 
in full or secured before a student may re-enter at the beginning 
of any semester. 

Other Fees 

Riding Fees— For instruction in riding the fees are as follows: 

Two hours a week (recreation only) $90.00 each semester 

Four hours a week (recreation or credit) $150.00 each semester 

Unlimited hours (recreation or credit) $180.00 each semester 

Recreational riding on a 

non-scheduled basis $3.60 per hour 

Bills for riding fees are collected by Grey Horse Stables. After 
a student has had one riding class, no refund of fees will be made 
unless a physician certifies that the student is physically unfit or 
the Registrar finds it nesessary to change the student's schedule. 

Academic Costume— Senior students are furnished an academic 

costume for use during their senior year at a cost of $7.00. FINANCES 

Books and Supplies— Books and supplies are available at the 
College Book Store. These cannot be included in a student's 
college account but must be paid for in cash at the time of 
purchase. 

Student Bank— It is suggested that students deposit their personal 
funds in the Student Bank. Deposit books are furnished by the 
College, and personal funds are handled according to savings 
account procedures. The Bank, which is under the jurisdiction 
of the Comptroller's Office, is open at certain hours daily through 
the week. 




35 



Financial Assistance 

Mary Washington is pleased to provide scholarships, loans and 
part-time employment for deserving students in need of help 
in meeting their College expenses. To apply for assistance, all 
students must file the Parents' Confidential Statement of the Col- 
lege Scholarship Service with the Director of Financial Aid, 
prior to March 1st of the year they plan to enter. 

Incoming students may obtain these Statements from their high 
schools, or by writing the College Scholarship Service, P. O. Box 
176, Princeton, New Jersey 08540. Action will be taken only on 
applications for those students who have been admitted to the 
College by the Committee on Admissions. 

Students presently attending Mary Washington may obtain their 
statements and applications from the Office of the Director of 
Financial Aid. 

Eligibility and Tenure.— Scholarships and loans are awarded to 
full-time students on the basis of character, need, and ability. 
Recipients must maintain good academic standing, a clear dis- 
ciplinary record and, when employed, render satisfactory service. 

36 Scholarships 

Alpha Psi Omega Scholarship 

FINANCES The Mary Washington Cast of Alpha Psi Omega awards a $50 

annual scholarship to the junior or senior major in Dramatic 
Arts and Speech who has maintained a high academic average, 
given evidence of need, and made an outstanding contribution 
to dramatics at the College. 

This award, given in the spring, will be credited to the recipient's 
account the following session. 

Lalla Gresham Ball Scholarships 

Established by Mrs. Jessie Ball duPont in memory of her mother. 
Applicants for these grants must be residents of one of the 
following counties of Virginia: King George, Westmoreland, 
Northumberland, Richmond, Lancaster, Essex, and King and 
Queen. The scholarships may be renewed annually, provided that 
the student remains in good standing at the College. 

Bayly-Tiffany Scholarships 

These awards, made by the University of Virginia upon our 
recommendation, are for residents of Northampton and Accomac 
Counties. However, if none are eligible from these areas, stu- 
dents from other eastern shore Virginia counties and eastern 
shore Maryland counties will be considered. 

Biology Scholarships 

Through a generous friend of the College, an ample fund to 
provide scholarships in biology has been established. Awards are 



made to outstanding and deserving Mary Washington juniors and 
seniors in biology or bio-chemistry upon recommendation of their 
departmental chairmen. Scholarships are also available to stu- 
dents planning graduate work in these fields elsewhere upon 
completion of their degrees here. 

Lt. General Albert J. Bowley Scholarship Fund 

Established by Mrs. Elsie Ball Bowley in memory of her 
husband, Lt. General Albert J. Bowley, a distinguished officer 
of the United States Army. Consideration is first given to daughters 
of service personnel, and then to students from free foreign 
countries (preferably Latin Americans), or to students whose major 
interests and work lie in the fields of history or political science. 
The recipient of this scholarship will devote to the James Monroe 
Memorial Foundation as much of her time and services as the 
authorities of Mary Washington College shall prescribe. 

Miss Richardia Johnson was awarded this Scholarship for the 
1969-70 session. 

Carol E. Casto Memorial Scholarship Fund 

Established by Mr. and Mrs. Harold J. Casto in memory of , 7 

their daughter, this gift of at least half of the costs of the general 

college and student activities fees will be awarded annually to FINANCES 

a resident of Virginia. Although preference is given to applicants 
from Arlington County, students from other counties in Virginia 
may apply. 

Chancellor's Alumnae Fund 

Established in 1961 by the Mary Washington College Alumnae 
Association. Awards are made at the discretion of the Chancellor 
to students, alumnae, or faculty of Mary Washington College for 
graduate or special study. Please address inquiries to the Director 
of Financial Aid. 

The Chandler Scholarship 

Algernon B. Chandler, President of Mary Washington from 1919 
to 1928, made a bequest of $1,000 to the College. The proceeds 
shall be used toward the education of a junior or senior selected 
on the basis of scholarship, attitude, and need. 

The Hatton Lathrop Clark Scholarship 

Established through the generosity of Mrs. Hatton Lathrop 
Clark, this full scholarship is awarded a Virginia student who, in 
the judgment of the Chancellor, deserves such recognition and has 
genuine financial need. Please address inquiries to the Director 
of Financial Aid. 



Educational Opportunity Grants 

Established by the Higher Education Act of 1965, this federal 
matching fund is designed for students "of exceptional financial 
need, who for lack of financial means of their own or of their 
families would be unable to enter or remain in college without 
an Educational Opportunity Grant." Further information may be 
obtained from the Director of Financial Aid. 

FMC Corporation, American Viscose Division, Award 

The FMC Corporation, American Viscose Division, has granted 
the College $1,000 to be used for scholarships or any other purpose 
the College believes desirable. 

General Undergraduate Scholarships 

On the basis of financial need, the College offers a number of 
scholarships from $100— $350 for the nine-month session. Applicants 
must be legal residents of Virginia. 



38 



FINANCES 




Martin Luther King Memorial Scholarship 

This $500 gift is awarded to a Virginia resident in her freshman 
year with option of renewal for her sophomore year. In addition, 
she will receive an equal amount from the Educational Op- 
portunity Grant to further guarantee her the college education 
she would otherwise be unable to achieve. Please address inquiries 
to the Director of Financial Aid. 

Mu Phi Epsilon Scholarship 

Phi Psi Chapter of Mu Phi Epsilon, National Professional 
Music Sorority, offers an applied music scholarship of $50. 
Majors in music who have reached second-semester freshman 
standing are eligible to apply. 

Minnie Rob Phaup Memorial Scholarship 

This scholarship established in memory of Minnie Rob Phaup, 
formerly of the Mary Washington College faculty , may be awarded 
to a graduating senior in psychology for graduate study in this 
field. 

Annie Fleming Smith Scholarship Fund 

Established by Mrs. Elsie Ball Bowley in memory of Mrs. 
Annie Fleming Smith, whose efforts made possible the preserva- 
tion of Kenmore, the home of George Washington's sister. In 
awarding this scholarship, primary consideration is given to stu- 
dents from the Virginia Northern Neck, consisting of King George, 
Westmoreland, Richmond, Lancaster, and Northumberland 



counties. This recipient will devote to the Kenmore Association 
as much of her time and services as the authorities of Mary 
Washington College shall prescribe. 

The Thomas Howard and Elizabeth Merchant Tardy Endow- 
ment Fund 

Established in 1962 by Mrs. Ida Elizabeth Tardy with an initial 
gift of $1,000. The income from the grant shall be used primarily 
to aid students descended from James R. Tardy and his wife, 
Mary M. Tardy, and from William H. Merchant and his wife, 
Belle Ashby Merchant. 

Mary Washington College Scholarships 

On the basis of financial need and academic achievement, the 
College offers a limited number of scholarships from $100 to 
$300 for the nine-month session. Applicants must be legal residents 
of Virginia. 

O. P. Wright Memorial Scholarship Fund 

Established in 1964 by a bequest from the estate of O. Pendle- 
ton Wright, architect of several buildings at Mary Washington, 
this award is made to deserving students with genuine financial 
need. 

Loans 

The National Defense Student Loan Program 

The purpose of the National Defense Student Loan Program 
is to make it possible for worthy students in need of financial 
assistance to obtain a college education. To be eligible, a borrower 
must carry at least half of the normal class load, need the amount 
of the loan, and be capable of maintaining good academic and 
social standing. These loans are available to all students who are 
citizens of the United States. 

The maximum that may be borrowed for any twelve-month 
period is $1,000, provided sufficient funds are available. The 
amount granted is determined by the Committee on Financial 
Aid upon review of the Parents' Confidential Statement. 

The borrower will sign a note for her loan, and repayment 
begins one year after she graduates or leaves school. Ten years are 
allowed to complete payment. No interest on the loan will 
accrue prior to the beginning of the repayment period , and interest 
thereafter is paid at the rate of three percent per year. In the 
event of the borrower's death or permanent and total disability, 
obligation to repay the loan is cancelled. 




39 



FINANCES 




40 



FINANCES 




The National Defense Education Act further provides that a 
maximum of fifty percent of the loan (plus interest) may be can- 
celled should the borrower become a full-time teacher in a public 
or non-profit elementary or secondary school. Such cancellation 
is at the rate of ten percent per annum (plus interest) for each 
year of full-time teaching service. 

Cancellation at the rate of 15 percent of the loan plus interest 
(up to 100 percent of the total loan) is granted for each year of 
full-time teaching in a designated low-income school or as a 
teacher of handicapped children in a public or other non-profit 
school. 

The College uses the current Parents' Confidential Statement of 
the College Scholarship Service as its application for this and all 
financial assistance. 

State Scholarships for Teachers 

These scholarships are in the nature of loans which are can- 
celled at a fixed rate for each year that the recipient teaches in 
the Virginia public schools after graduation. Applicants must be 
residents of Virginia and meet the qualifications established by 
the State Board of Education. Information and applications may be 
obtained from the Director of Financial Aid. 

Other types of loans are available upon request. 

Student Employment 

The College offers many opportunities for part-time employ- 
ment for qualified students with a "C" average or better. Most 
positions, which include those in the library, residence halls, 
dining hall and faculty offices, pay from approximately $400 
to $600 for the nine-month session. For information and ap- 
plications, please address inquiries to the Office of Student Em- 
ployment, Box 1341. 







• ft. 






>*A, 



4 M 



The Student and the College 

Mary Washington, like most colleges, has its own way of life. 
It is important, therefore, that prospective students and their 
parents become familiar with its purposes and objectives before 
submitting applications for admission. 

Mary Washington College is committed to the ideals of in- 
dividual responsibility and the pursuit of excellence, and it is 
felt that these ideals are best achieved when conditions of demo- 
cratic tradition and a high standard of personal honor exist. 
For this reason, the Student Association and the Honor System 
pay vital roles in student life at Mary Washington College. 

In this context students are encouraged to make decisions for 
themselves concerning the day-to-day conduct of their life at the 
College. The students are expected to live under regulations pre- 
scribed by the Student Association and are bound to maintain 
a high standard of personal and academic conduct by the self- 
imposed— and self-regulated— Honor System. 

The College strives to create and maintain an atmosphere of 
friendliness and helpfullness on the part of students and faculty. 
It is expected that students will at all times uphold the standards, 
traditions, and regulations of the College and that parents will 
cooperate in these matters. A student is likewise held responsible 
for the conduct of her guests on campus. 

Insofar as possible, the College shares with parents or guardians 
the responsibility of helping the student to uphold the standards 
and abide by the regulations of the institution. The fact that a 
student is of legal age or is paying her own expenses in no way 
alters this relationship. 

The College administration reserves the right to request any 
student to withdraw whose conduct or general attitude is considered 
unsatisfactory, even though no specific charge is made against her. 



43 

STUDENT 

LIFE 




Student Association 



44 

STUDENT 
LIFE 



The Student Association is composed of the entire student 
body. Its purpose is to promote personal responsibility, loyalty, 
and a high sense of honor in the individual student, and to 
further the best interests of the student body and the College by 
inculcating the underlying principles of self-government and 
democracy. 

The Association has executive, legislative, and judicial branches, 
each with clearly defined duties and responsibilities, and each an 
integral and vital part of the governmental process. The constitu- 
tion of the Association is designed to involve the greatest number 
of students possible in the governmental process, making it more 
essential to the conduct of student affairs. 

As prescribed by the constitution, legislative powers are delegated 
to a representative student senate. The position of the SA Execu- 
tive Chairman is defined by the document as the chief executive of 
the Student Association and as the primary link between the 
students and the administration of the College. Designated to 
assist the Executive Chairman in fulfilling the executive re- 
sponsibilities is an Executive Cabinet consisting of the Legislative 
Chairman, Judicial Chairman, Academic Chairman, Social Chair- 
man, and National Affairs Chairman, plus three ex-officio student 
members. 

Judicial responsibilities on the campus are shared by the in- 
dividual residence halls and a joint council, consisting of students 
and faculty members. In addition, there is a campus review court 
authorized to hear appeals on judicial matters. Other residential 
matters and the coordination of residence hall activities are dealt 
with by a campus residential council. 

A Student Handbook containing the constitution, a detailed 
outline of the Student Association organization and responsibilities, 
and student and administrative regulations is given to each student 
at the beginning of each college year. The new student is further 
acquainted with these rules and with the Honor System in 
orientation groups sponsored by the Student Association and the 
Honor Council in the first week of the session. 

In addition to the responsibilities specifically designated by 
the SA constitution, students are afforded an opportunity to 
play an active role in the decision-making process at the College 
by serving on various campus-wide committees dealing with 
academic, social, cultural and community affairs. 



The Honor System 

The Honor System is a moral code of personal integrity at 
Mary Washington College. It belongs to the students, who derive 
their authority and responsibility from the Board of Visitors 
of the University of Virginia. Because students are responsible 
for deciding when a breach of honor has been committed, the 
enforcement of the Honor System is in their hands. 

Each student as a member of the student body at Mary Wash- 
ington has the responsibility, not only for familiarizing herself 
with the provisions of the Honor Code upon which the student 
body has agreed, but also for developing within herself the highest 
and strongest personal honor code possible. Each student must 
realize that by accepting admission to Mary Washington, she has 
acknowledged her commitment to the provisions of the Honor 
Code. When she signs the Honor Pledge Card, she is committing 
herself to support the Honor System. She is stating that she under- 
stands it, and realizes that a plea of ignorance is never acceptable. 

The Honor System provides that a student shall act honorably 
in all relationships of campus life. Lying, cheating, stealing, or 
breaking one's word of honor are considered infringements of the 
Honor System. Whenever a violation of the Honor System is 
proved, the penalty, usually dismissal from the College, will be 
determined by the Honor Council. The pledge on quizzes, ex- 
aminations, written problems, and exercises means that the work 
which the student hands in to her professor is her own, which she 
herself has done in accordance with the requirements for the course 
as laid down by the professor. The pledge is as follows: "I 
hereby declare upon my word of honor that I have neither given 
nor received help on this work." The faculty cooperates in es- 
tablishing a clear understanding of these requirements. In any 
case of doubt as to the nature or extent of a pledge, the student 
should immediately request that the professor in charge make 
the requirement perfectly clear to the entire class. 

Every student entering the College for the first time is given 
a copy of the complete Code of the Honor System and she is 
expected to familiarize herself with its provisions. Orientation 
counsellors work to interpret the Honor System to every new 
student before she is asked to sign a pledge stating that she under- 
stands what is expected of her and that she realized that a plea 
of ignorance will not be accepted by the Honor Council. Regis- 
tration as a student in the College is not considered to have been 
completed until this card has been signed. No grades or credits 
will be released unless the signed Honor Pledge Card is on file. 



45 

STUDENT 
LIFE 



46 

STUDENT 
LIFE 



The Honor Council is only a judicial body designed for trial 
purposes of specific cases brought to it by a student regarding 
possible violation of the Honor Code. It has no responsibility 
for discovering guilt before an accusation has been made. The 
Honor Council shall consist of a President and eight class 
representatives. The President shall be elected by the student body 
by secret ballot on the basis of a simple majority of the votes 
cast. The eight Honor Council Representatives, two elected 
respectively from each of the four classes by a simple majority 
of the votes cast, will comprise the voting members of the Honor 
Council. The Honor Council President is not a voting member 
and during a trial, she shall serve only in the capacity of chairman. 

The Honor Pledge Card that each student must sign to complete 
matriculation at the College reads as follows: 

"I, as a student and a citizen of Mary Washington College, 
do hereby resolve to uphold the honor of the College by re- 
fraining from giving or receiving academic material in a manner 
not authorized by the instructor; from the illegal appropriation 
of the property of others; and from the deliberate falsification 
of facts. I shall do all in my power at all times to create a spirit 
of honesty and honor for its own sake, both by upholding the 
Honor System myself and by helping others to do so. 

"I understand the Honor System and realize that a plea of 
ignorance will not be accepted by the Honor Council." 




Residential Life 

The majority of Mary Washington College students are required 
to live in college housing. Two exceptions are permitted: (1) 
students with junior or senior status, who are in good standing 
academically, financially, residentially, and socially, and are not 
the recipients of financial assistance (excluding student aid and 
state teachers scholarships) may with the consent of their parents 
reside off campus; and (2) students may live in their homes or 
with an immediate relative. 

Applications for off-campus housing must be submitted to the 
Director of Admissions not later than August 1 before the opening 
of the School year in September. Permission is granted then for 
the entire academic year. Student requests normally will not be 
approved for off-campus housing the second semester except for 
applications submitted by August 1. Off-campus arrangements 
with immediate relatives must be approved by the Director of 
Admissions. All students living off campus will be regarded officially 
as day students. 

Regulations concerning the residence halls are contained in the 
Student Handbook. Students may occupy their rooms on the 
dates specified by the College calendar. Accommodations are 
provided for the students who wish to remain on campus during 
the Thanksgiving and Spring vacations, but no residence hall or 
dining room facilities are available during the Christmas holidays. 

Room assignments for incoming students are made by the Office 
of the Dean of Students. Students presently enrolled in the College 
are allowed to make their room reservations for the next session 
on a designated day in the spring. A student must have completed 
the re-admission procedure before she can reserve a room. 

Social Life 

An active social program is planned at Mary Washington College 
each year in an effort to provide events and activities to be de- 
sired and enjoyed by as many students as possible. 

The social calendar for the year includes receptions, dances, 
teas and mixers; programs by the departments, such as music, 
dramatics, and physical education; lectures by visiting lecturers; 
concerts by guest artists; and regularly scheduled moving pictures, 
both foreign and American. 




47 



STUDENT 
LIFE 



Drama Series 

The Department of Dramatic Arts and Speech annually presents 
at least three major productions and a student-directed children's 



play. In selecting the plays to be presented consideration is given 
to providing the students a varied and balanced drama season 
and to best utilizing the talents of the drama majors. During the 
1969-70 school session there were performances of The Cherry 
Orchard by Anton Chekhov, A Taste of Honey by Shelagh Delaney, 
and The Three Penny Opera by Bertolt Brecht. 

Dances 

In the course of the year there are at least three formal dances, 
two of them open to the entire student body; the third sponsored 
by the Junior Class. In addition to the formal dances, there are 
occasional informal dances and mixers throughout the year. 



STUDENT 
LIFE 




Concerts 

A varied concert series is planned each year to include both 
visiting artists and student and faculty performances. A number 
of major concerts are scheduled each year featuring programs by 
symphony orchestras, vocal and instrumental artists, and dramatic 
groups. During the 1969-70 school year, for example, performances 
were given at Mary Washington College by Oliver Culbentson 
and Carey McMurran, a violin-piano duo; Don Redlich and 
Company, a modern dance group; the Atlanta Symphony, 
Orchestra, Robert Shaw conducting; the Pennsylvania Ballet; and 
the Trumpets of the Lord, a musical adaptation of James Weldon 

Johnson's "God's Trombones." 

In addition to guest performers, there are presentations by 
faculty and student members of the Department of Music. Each 
year there is a Winter Band Concert and Christmas and Spring 
Choral Concerts, plus several student and general recitals. 

Art Exhibitions 

Each year the College holds a number of art exhibitions in- 
cluding at least one major exhibition and a student exhibition. 
These shows are held in the duPont Galleries located in the Fine 
Arts Center. The major exhibitions are usually of a magnitude 
to attract visitors from throughout the state and feature works 
of note in art circles. During the 1968-69 school session, for ex- 
ample, the College presented an exhibition of the works of Teruo 
Hara, a noted ceramist and a Visiting Artist at the College. In 
1967-68 the College sponsored a rare public exhibition of U.S. 
Senator Hugh Scott's collection of Tang Dynasty art. 

The student exhibition is usually held at the end of the year 
and provides an opportunity for student artists to display what 




they have done during the school term. It also gives the College a 
chance to recognize outstanding achievement in the studio arts 
with the presentation of awards. 

Other Events 

Two segments of the Department of Health, Physical Educa- 
tion and Recreation also present special programs each year. The 
Terrapin Club (a synchronized swimming club) presents an ex- 
hibition in the fall and a show in the spring. The Mary Washing- 
ton Dance Company each year presents a dance concert. 

In addition to these special events there are numerous inter- 
class and club parties and functions and other group activities 
in which a student may participate if she so desires. 

Religious Life 

As a non-sectarian institution recognizing the religious freedom 
of the students, Mary Washington College makes no attempt 
to project into their lives the views of any one faith. The churches 
in Fredericksburg, representing most of the denominations, extend 
a cordial welcome to the students, who are encouraged to associate 
themselves with some church. 

A number of the denominations have organizations on campus. 
In cooperation with the local churches these groups promote the 
welfare of their members through frequent meetings for discussion, 
devotions, or social activities. 

The various religious organizations include: the Baptist Stu- 
dent Union, the Episcopal Students, Student Religious Liberals 
(associated with the Unitarian Fellowship), the Lutheran Student 
Association, the Newman Movement, the Christian Science Or- 
ganization, Hillel, the Wesley Foundation, and the Westminster 
Fellowship. 

There are three full-time church counsellors provided by their 
respective denominations (Baptist, Methodist, and Presbyterian), 



49 

STUDENT 
LIFE 



who direct centers adjacent to the campus. The College is not 
responsible for their programs but cooperates with the counsellors 
through the Office of the Dean of Students. 

There is also a chapter of the Young Women's Christian Associa- 
tion (YWCA) on the campus. The YWCA sponsors campus- 
wide religious concerns programs periodically and directs the annual 
World University Service (WUS) drive. 



50 

STUDENT 
LIFE 



Health Program 

Mary Washington College is interested in the prevention of 
illness and the promotion of a high standard of health in its 
student body. 

The College is concerned with conditions affecting student 
health in order that all cases of illness may be given proper care; 
that the incidence and spread of contagious deseases may be re- 
duced to the lowest terms; and that the general working effi- 
ciency and living standards of the students may be maintained at 
a high level. 

Every student is required each year to present a certificate 
from her family physician indicating the results of a recent 
physical examination. This examination should be made not more 
than two months prior to the beginning of the session. Under no 
circumstances will a student be assigned to a room or allowed to 
register for classes until this completed medical form is on file. 

If this examination reveals information pertinent to the health 
and welfare of the student, such information should be included 
with the certificate. It is strongly recommended that all students 
receive the tetanus toxoid during the summer before entrance. 

The medical fee for students living in the residence halls covers 
the charges for services of the medical and nursing staff of the 
College and for time spent in the College Infirmary as a patient. 

Every student is required to participate in some form of physi- 
cal education which is in keeping with the condition and parti- 
cular physical needs of the individual. Special guidance is provided 
for those with physical handicaps. 

A complete program of intramural activities is provided, some 
of which are hockey, basketball, tennis, swimming, golf, lacrosse, 
bowling, fencing, dancing, archery, riding, and volleyball. 

Specialists, Private Nursing, Etc. 

The College does not assume responsibility for the cost of 
services of specialists or private nurses, or for special prescrip- 
tions, operations, or fees in the local hospital. 



A daily report is made by the Infirmary to the Dean of Stu- 
dents. In cases of severe illness or accident, the parents or guard- 
ians are informed promptly. 

Mary Washington Hospital in the City of Fredericksburg 
provides all modern facilities, including the services of specialists 
in all branches of medical science. A student is often referred to 
the hospital for diagnostic purposes and when the illness is too 
serious for her to remain in the College Infirmary. 



Health Regulations 

1. Students living in their own homes are not entitled to the 
services of the infirmary or College medical nursing staff. 

2. It is necessary to obtain an excuse through the College infir- 
mary for any absence from class on account of illness. 

3. The College calendar should be referred to in making out-of- 
town medical and dental appointments so that such engage- 
ments will not involve leaving early or entering late at holidays. 

4. A student ill enough to be in bed should not remain in a 
residence hall, but should be in the infirmary where she can 
have proper care. No meals are served in the residence hall 
rooms. 

5. Students detained at home because of illness should notify 
the College infirmary immediately upon their return to the 
campus. 

6. Students who have been exposed to any infectious disease 
must report to the College Physician before attending classes 
or mingling with other students. 

7. A consulting physician may be called at the request of either 
the student or her parents or guardian; this is to be done 
through the College Physician or the Nurse. 

8. Responsibility for physical examination information for transfer 
to other colleges and for summer employment will rest with the 
examining physician and will not be the responsibility of the 
Infirmary to forward a copy of the records for the above 
purposes. 



51 

STUDENT 
LIFE 



Special Services and Opportunities 

There are a number of special services and opportunities avail- 
able at Mary Washington College aimed at complementing the 
formal education a student receives and offering assistance to the 
student who desires it. These services are available to every student 
on a voluntary basis. 



52 

STUDENT 
LIFE 




Guidance and Counselling 

The College attempts to provide adequate guidance and counselling 
without taking from the student the responsibility for making her 
own decisions. A Faculty Committee on Academic Counselling 
and Guidance helps to establish policies in this area. 

Faculty Adviser 

Upon her arrival at Mary Washington College, each new student 
is assigned a faculty adviser, who, as far as possible, is an 
instructor in the field of the student's major interest. The adviser 
helps the student with her program of studies and is available for 
regular consultation throughout the year. Freshmen in particular 
are urged to maintain close contact with their advisers. 

Ordinarily the student retains the same adviser during her 
sophomore year, but she may change at any time upon request. As 
an upperclass student she will be under the direction of the 
chairman of her major department or someone designated by him 
at the time she receives permission to major. 

Students are also invited to seek advice from the various deans, 
and members of the faculty, and also from residence hall directors. 
Although no sharp distinction is made, students usually confer 
with those in the Offices of the Dean of Students and the Director 



of Student Affairs on matters concerning personal and social life, 
and with the Dean or Associate Dean on academic matters. 

Counseling Center 

For special problems the College offers to its students psycho- 
logical services on a full-time basis. Testing is available for 
the assessment of aptitude, interest, and personality patterns as 
they relate to academic and career-oriented questions and plans. 
The Counseling Center also receives students (for the most part 
self-referred) who present problems in personal, emotional, and 
social adjustment. The facilities of the Counseling Center are 
provided by the College on a non-fee basis and with complete 
assurance of confidentiality. 



Placement Bureau 

The Placement Bureau offers an advisory and placement service 
to graduates and prospective graduates seeking employment. 
A folder of detailed information is compiled for each graduate, 
and an effort is made to give as complete a picture as possible 
of the candidate's qualifications. 

Business executives, personnel directors, school superintendents, 
and others interested in employing graduates are invited to visit 
the College, consult the credentials compiled by the Bureau, and 
interview applicants. Confidential reports giving a full and ac- 
curate estimate of each applicant will be furnished on request of 
a prospective employer. 



53 



STUDENT 
LIFE 



College Theatre 

The College Theatre is an integral part of the Department of 
Dramatic Arts and Speech and affords students the opportunity to 
appear before the public in major productions of plays by the 
world' s great authors , and to gain practical experience in the various 
phases of theatrical production. 

The Department of Dramatic Arts and Speech requires that all 
students engaged in the activities of the department and its 
organizations maintain at least a "C" average. Any student not 
maintaining this average during the current semester or preceding 
semester will not be allowed to participate in the activities. 

Also available in duPont Hall is a radio broadcasting work- 
shop, with studios and a control room. 





54 

STUDENT 
LIFE 



Language Houses and Laboratories 

Brent Hall and Marye Hall are language houses for students of 
French and Spanish respectively. In addition, one or more suites 
in appropriate residence halls may be reserved for German 
majors. With the guidance of staff members from the Depart- 
ment of Modern Foreign Languages, students engage in a syste- 
matic development of fluency in the oral use of the language. 
Seminar-type meetings, visiting speakers, and the social and cul- 
tural activities of the language clubs, which are centered in these 
houses, give additional opportunities for acquiring facility in speak- 
ing. Major students must be given first consideration, but there 
is generally room for other students who have the necessary 
language proficiency, which is usually attained after completion 
of an intermediate course. 

The Department of Modern Foreign Languages operates two 
thirty-booth listen-record-listen laboratories, which are open for 
class sections under the regular instructor. Under the direction 
of a specially trained staff member, with student assistants, the 
laboratories are open several hours a day as a library facility 
for individual use. Members of beginning and intermediate classes 
are expected to spend considerable time in the laboratory on their 
oral assignments, dictation exercises, and pronunciation. Students 
on more advanced levels also use the laboratories. 



Field Trips and Tours 

In addition to the regular program of instruction, the College 
sponsors visits to the local shrines and other places of interest, 
including those in the immediate vicinity of Fredericksburg, in 
Washington, D. C, Richmond, and other places easily accessible. 
The air-conditioned college bus offers transportation to concerts and 
plays, and to historic sites such as Stratford and Williamsburg. 



The chairmen of various academic departments have charge of 
the trips or tours used to supplement class instruction. These, 
also made in the college bus, reinforce the work in history, art, 
music, geology, and other fields. Students are able to attend con- 
ventions, visit other educational institutions, and take advantage 
of the cultural facilities in nearby cities. 

Art students visit the galleries in Washington and Richmond, 
music students attend musical events, students in dramatics attend 
plays, and students in economics and political science are able to 
visit government or legislative sessions in these two capital cities. 
Students in psychology and sociology go to such institutions as 
St. Elizabeth's Hospital in Washington and the Western State 
Hospital in Staunton. Trips of a general cultural nature are 
often open to any interested undergraduates. 



Clubs and Organizations 

There are a number of honorary fraternities, scholastic and 
professional societies, departmental clubs, and other student organi- 
zations. Although course work is of primary interest to the student 
at Mary Washington, many find time and energy to devote to 
these other activities. All organizations are under the supervision 
of the student Inter-Club Association in cooperation with the 
Office of the Dean of Students and the Student Government 
Association. There are no social sororities at the College. 



55 

STUDENT 
LIFE 



Honorary Organizations 

There are honorary fraternities or scholastic societies for al- 
most every discipline pursued at Mary Washington College. In 
addition to these special interest honor groups there is a chapter 
of Mortar Board, the national honorary organization for senior 
women, which taps outstanding juniors on the basis of leadership, 
scholarship, and service to the College. 

The national honorary groups with chapters at Mary Washing- 
ton College include: Alpha Phi Sigma (scholastic), Alpha Psi Omega 
(dramatic), Chi Beta Psi (science), Eta Sigma Phi (classics), 
Mu Phi Epsilon (music), Omicron Delta Epsilon (economics), 
Phi Sigma Iota (Romance Languages), Pi Gamma Mu (social 
sciences), Phi Chi (psychology), and Zeta Phi Eta (professional 
speech arts). Sigma Omega Chi (sociology) and Sigma Tau Chi 
(economics) are local honorary organizations, and there is an 
English Honorary Fraternity. 





56 

STUDENT 
LIFE 



Departmental and Other Clubs 

A number of departmental or general clubs and organizations 
offer activities in which students with special interests may 
participate. These include: Der Deutsche Verein, El Club Espanol, 
the Italian Club, Le Cercle Francais, the College Chorus and 
Concert Band, the Mary Washington Players, PiNuChi (nursing), 
Mu Alpha Chi (medical technology and pre-medical), the Organ 
Guild, the Student Education Association, the Day Students' 
Club, International Relations Club, Mike Club, Oriental Club, 
Physical Therapy Club, Psychology Club, Sociology Club, Science 
(Matthew Fontaine Maury) Club, and the Young Democrats 
and Young Republicans. 

Recreational Association 

In addition to the organized activities listed above, there are 
several campus-wide events each year that are planned by the 
Recreation Association to promote wholesome activity and recrea- 
tion. The Association also sponsors five additional clubs: the Hoof 
Prints, Fencing, Physical Education, Outing, and Terrapin Clubs. 



Student Publications 

There are three student publications on the campus: The 
Bullet, the College newspaper published weekly; The Epaulet, 
a literary magazine published quarterly; and The Battlefield, the 
College yearbook. The Student Handbook is issued by the Stu- 
dent Government Association in cooperation with the Office of 
the Dean of Students. 



Organization 

Semester Plan 

The College is organized on the semester plan, and students 
may enter at the beginning of either semester. (See College 
Calendar.) Beginning sections of certain basic courses are offered 
in the second semester. Students who enter the second semester 
in February are given special orientation to help them adjust 
readily to the College. 

Summer Session 

The Summer Session is an integral part of the school year. The 
courses offered have the same credit and the same standard of 
work as those offered in the regular session. Classes are offered 
Monday through Friday. 

Although the majority of students spend four years in college, 
the work for a degree at Mary Washington College can be com- 
pleted in three calendar years by attendance at three general 
sessions and three summer sessions. It is possible to complete 
a semester's work in each of three courses by attending the eight- 
week term. A vacation period of five weeks comes between the 
close of the summer session and the beginning of the fall semester. 

High school graduates who would normally enter college in 
September may begin with the summer session in June and com- 
plete a substantial portion of the first semester's work before the 
fall term. 



59 



ACADEMIC 
INFORMATION 




60 



ACADEMIC 
INFORMATION 



Terminology 

Semester Hours.— All credit toward graduation is calculated in 
semester hours. A semester hour represents one hour of class 
instruction (or two hours of laboratory work) a week for one 
semester, or approximately eighteen weeks. A college course that 
meets three times a week for a semester carries three semester 
hours credit. A course that meets three times weekly throughout 
the session (two semesters) carries six semester hours credit. 

Required Course.— A course that every candidate for a degree 
must complete, regardless of the subject in which she plans to 
major. It is recommended that all required courses be completed 
during the freshman and sophomore years. 

Major Program.— A field of concentration or specialization to 
which a student devotes a large proportion of her program of 
studies in the junior and senior years. Usually, a major program 
consists of 24 semester hours in the major subject (in addition 
to any credits that may be included in the general requirements 
for graduation) and 12 semester hours in related fields. 

Elective.— A course not specifically required for a degree or 
for the major program which the student is following. 

Course.— Subject or portion of a subject as outlined in this 
bulletin for the session or for a semester. 

Quality Point.— A numerical measure of the student's progress 
toward a degree, awarded on the basis of grades earned. The 
number of quality points must be at least twice the number of 
semester hours attempted. 

Unit.— A basis for evaluating high school work. A unit rep- 
resents a minimum of five 40-minute periods of class work a 
week for at least 36 weeks. 



Academic Regulations 

Classification of Students 

Freshmen.— Students with fewer than 28 semester hours of credit. 
Sophomores.— Students with from 28 to 57 semester hours of 
credit. 

Juniors.— Students with from 58 to 89 semester hours of 

credit. 

Seniors.— Students with as many as 90 semester hours of 

credit. 

Specials.— Students enrolled at the college who are not con- 
sidered degree candidates. 



Student Load 



A student should plan her class schedule carefully each semester 
in consultation with her faculty adviser, taking care both to ensure 
normal progress toward graduation and to avoid too heavy 
an academic load. The faculty adviser must approve the student's 
schedule before she completes her registration. 

In her first year of college, a student should register for not 
less than fourteen or more than seventeen credit hours a semester. 
After the first year she should ordinarily carry from fifteen to 
eighteen credit hours a semester. 

No student living in a College residence hall during the regular 
session may carry less than twelve semester hours without per- 
mission from the Dean of the College. 

Excess Hours 

Only in exceptional circumstances will a student be allowed 
to carry excess hours (more than seventeen hours the first year, 
more than eighteen hours after the first year). Permission to carry 
excess hours must be obtained from the Dean of the College. 

Change of Schedule or Courses 

A student's academic program and schedule of classes must 
be approved each semester by her faculty adviser. After it has 
been reviewed and accepted by the Registrar, a schedule may not 
be changed without permission. 

A student wishing to make a change should consult her faculty 
adviser and get his written permission to drop or add any course. 
During the first week of the semester she must present this per- 
mission to the Registrar's Office; after the first week she must 
present it to the Dean or Associate Dean of the College for 
approval. 

No credit is allowed for a course for which the student has 
not officially registered and which is not listed on the class schedule 
filed in the Registrar's Office. No course may be added after 
the first three weeks of classes. 

If a course is dropped after the first three weeks of a semester, 
a grade of "F" will be recorded unless the instructor certifies 
that the student was passing at the time of withdrawal. An 
exception to this rule may be made for extended absence because 
of illness. If a course is dropped during the last three weeks of 
classes, a grade of "F" will be recorded. 

A student dropping out of a course without permission will 
automatically receive a grade of "F". 



61 



ACADEMIC 
INFORMATION 



62 



ACADEMIC 
INFORMATION 



Class Attendance 

Regular class attendance is expected of all students except in 
case of illness or other emergency. Students are responsible for 
the material covered in a course whether they are present or not. 

Request to be absent or explanations for absence from class 
should be made to the instructor teaching the course, except in 
the case of final examinations, which must be taken according 
to schedule unless specifically excused by the Office of the Dean. 

All excuses for absence must be submitted within three days 
after the absence has occurred. 

Absences from class immediately preceding or following a holiday 
are especially discouraged. Students should consult the college 
calendar in making plane and train reservations. Students are not 
permitted to shift classes or examinations to expedite leaving the 
College for the weekend, holidays, or any other purpose. 

Medical excuses for both residential and day students must 
be submitted to the College Infirmary, which will make a report 
to the Registrar's Office for transmission to each instructor. 

No student may receive credit for a course in which she has 
missed more than one-fourth of the class meetings, regardless of 
the reason. 

Students whose class attendance is unnecessarily irregular may 
be requested to withdraw from the College. 





Grading 

A student's class performance determines the final grade in any 
course. Class performance is based on the quality of a student's 
work as indicated by recitation grades, written tests, examinations, 
laboratory work or term papers. 

Scholarship standing is indicated as follows: 

"A" is given for work of unusual excellence. 

"B" is given for work distinctly above average. 

"C" denotes work of average or medium quality. 

"D" is the lowest passing mark and represents work of below 
average quality. 

"E" denotes unsatisfactory work in which a condition has 
been incurred. When the condition is removed, a grade of "D" 
is recorded. Conditions not made up by the end of the following 
semester automatically become "F." 

"Inc." Incomplete. Incomplete work not made up by the end 
of the following semester automatically becomes "F." 

"F" denotes failure and requires that the subject be taken again 
and passed before credit can be allowed. 

"P" Pass. This indicates that the course requirement has been 
successfully met. 

"S" Satisfactory. This indicates that the course requirement has 
been successfully met. 

"U" Unsatisfactory. This means that the requirement has not 
been successfully met and an additional course must be taken 
before credit can be allowed. 

Credits earned with a grade of "P" or "S" count towards 
graduation but carry no quality points. 

Pass/ Fail— With approval of her advisor, a student may take 
one such course each semester for elective credit only, on a 
Pass/ Fail basis. She must register as a Pass/ Fail student by the end 
of the initial three-week drop-add period. After that time no 
change in status is permitted. Because Pass/ Fail credits carry no 
quality points, they are not used in determining a student's 
grade point average. The credits earned count toward graduation, 
however, and a "P" or "F" is recorded on her transcript. 



63 



ACADEMIC 
INFORMATION 



Credit by Examination 

The College not only participates in the Advanced Placement 
Program and the College Level Examination Program of the 
College Entrance Examination Board (see p. 24) but also permits 
credit by examination for courses offered in the regular curriculum. 

A student may request that a department examine her in any 
appropriate course (not independent study or seminar courses) 
for which she has not been enrolled during the semester in which 
she makes her request. If the department agrees to her request 
and she passes the examination, she will receive the allotted number 
of credits with a grade of P, which will not affect her quality 
point standing. If she fails the examination, she will receive a grade 
of I, which will become F unless she attends and passes the 
course, or passes another equivalent examination, by the end of 
the next semester. 

The credit hours will be regarded as part of the student's 
academic load and, if she is a part-time student, the normal 
charges per credit hour will apply. 



64 



ACADEMIC 
INFORMATION 



Scholarship Quality Points 

A candidate for a degree must have earned at least twice as 
many quality points as semester hours attempted at Mary Wash- 
ington College before being permitted to graduate. This means that 
the student has earned the minimum 2.0 or "C" overall grade 
point average required for graduation. Courses taken in the major 
subject in fulfillment of the major program requirements must 
also average at least 2.0 or "C". 

The following Quality Point system enables students to keep 
constant check on their standing, and to know at all times 
whether or not they are maintaining the overall "C" average 
required by the College. 

For each semester hour earned with a grade of "A" four 
quality points are allowed. 

For each semester hour earned with a grade of "B" three 
quality points are allowed. 

For each semester hour earned with a grade of "C" two quality 
points are allowed. 

For each semester hour earned with a grade of "D" one quality 
point is allowed. 

For each semester hour earned with a grade of "P" no quality 
point is allowed or required. 

For each semester hour earned with a grade of "S" no quality 
point is allowed or required. 



In each case the number of semester hours credit in each 
course is multiplied by the number of quality points assigned to 
the grade earned in that course. For example, "A" in a course 
for which three semester hours credit are allowed entitles the stu- 
dent to twelve quality points. In this same course a grade of "B" 
would entitle the student to nine quality points, "C" to six 
quality points, and "D" to three quality points. No quality 
points are earned for grades of "F," "P," "S," or "incom- 
plete." 

A permanent record of quality points earned as well as semester 
hours attempted and earned is kept in the Registrar's Office. 
This information is available to students and parents at all times. 

Reports, Deficiencies and Failures 

Regular reports are mailed to students and parents at the end 
of each semester. In addition to the semester grades, notice is 
given of cumulative totals in the number of hours attempted, 
hours passed, and quality points earned. 

Students and parents are also notified of unsatisfactory or 
deficient work in the middle of each semester. 

Students with academic deficiencies are urged to make every 
effort to remove them before the end of the semester, since in 
order to graduate, they must maintain at least a 2.0 or "C" 
average in all credit hours attempted, as well as in courses taken 
in the major subject to satisfy the major program requirements. 

The Dean of the College and the Associate Dean are ready at 
all times to confer with students or parents regarding academic 
problems. 



65 



ACADEMIC 
INFORMATION 



Repeating A Course 

Courses may be repeated only with permission from the Office 
of the Dean. (1) If a student repeats and passes a course which 
she previously has failed, then her record will be credited with 
the hours passed and the additional quality points; however, she 
will not be charged with any additional hours attempted. (2) 
If a student repeats for quality points a course she has already 
passed, her record will be charged with no additional hours at- 
tempted or hours passed, but the quality points earned on the 
second grade for the course will be substituted for the quality 
points originally earned in the course. 



Academic Probation and Suspension 



66 



ACADEMIC 
INFORMATION 



Probation 

In general, a student is placed on academic probation if she 
is not making satisfactory progress toward graduation. 

1. In terms of credit hours a student will be placed on academic 
probation if 

a. in any semester, including the first, she fails more than 
four semester hours work; 

b. in any semester she receives grades of D, E, or F 
on more than 7 semester hours of work, regardless of 
her total number of hours or quality points; 

c. at the end of her freshman year she has fewer than 28 
semester hours; 

d. at the end of her third semester she has fewer than 
43 semester hours; 

e. at the end of her sophomore year she has fewer than 
58 semester hours; 

f. at the end of her fifth semester she has fewer than 
73 semester hours; 

g. at the end of her junior year she has fewer than 90 
semester hours. 

2. In terms of quality points a student will be placed on 
probation if 

a. at any time during her first five semesters she falls more 
than 1 1 quality points below twice the number of hours 
she has attempted; 

b. at the end of her sixth or seventh semester she does 
not have twice as many quality points as hours attempted. 








Suspension 

A student will be suspended if 

1. at any time after the end of the first semester she falls 
more than 6 credit hours below the minimum standards 
set forth in section 1 under Probation; 

she falls more than 19 quality points below twice the num- 
ber of hours she has attempted; 

at the end of her sixth or seventh semester she falls more 
than 9 quality points below twice the number of hours 
she has attempted; 

she incurs probation for a third time. (For reinstatement 
after suspension, see the Catalogue, p. 25.) 



2. 



3. 




As previously noted, a student may be placed on probation 
or suspended for either a semester hour or quality point de- 
ficiency. Under usual circumstances a student will not be granted 
probationary status for more than two semesters. A student who 
is suspended for the first time may be readmitted on probation 
by earning in the summer school of this College at least eight 
semester hours and sixteen quality points. A student seeking such 
reinstatement must do so ordinarily in the summer session im- 
mediately following the academic suspension. 

Withdrawal 
Voluntary Withdrawal 

A student wishing to withdraw from the College must have 
advance consent of her parent or guardian if she is a minor and 
must inform the Dean of Students in any case. 
Enforced Withdrawal 

Students who continuously fail to meet the academic and social 
standards of the College may be asked to withdraw or not to 
return to Mary Washington. 
Withdrawal While on Probation or Under Suspension 

A student who withdraws from the College while on academic 
probation or under suspension for academic deficiency normally 
is not eligible for readmission. Upon request by the student, 
special consideration for readmission may be granted by the 
Committee on Admissions. 
Marriage 

A student entering into marriage prior to college enrollment or 
during attendance at college (including summer and other vacation 
periods) is ineligible to remain in residence except with special 

permission. Any change in status must be discussed in advance 
with the Dean of Students. Each case is considered on its 
individual merits. 



67 



ACADEMIC 
INFORMATION 




Recognition of Academic Achievement 

The Dean 's List 

A student who attains a grade point average of 3.50 or better 
for any semester with no grade below "C" is placed on the Dean's 
List of Honor Students. 

Intermediate and Final Honors 

A junior at Mary Washington College who has achieved a 
3.75 grade-point average in her freshman and sophomore years 
is awarded "Intermediate Honors" at the Chancellor's Convoca- 
tion held during the first week of the session. 

Similarly, a student who attains a 3.75 grade-point average in 
her junior and senior years is awarded "Final Honors" at the 
graduating exercises held at the end of the session. 



68 



ACADEMIC 
INFORMATION 



Academic Distinction 

General academic attainment of graduating seniors will be 
recognized through the awards of Distinction, High Distinction 
and Highest Distinction, based solely on the student's academic 
average at Mary Washington College. The level of attainment for 
each award shall be as follows: Distinction: 3.25; High Distinction: 
3.50; Highest Distinction: 3.75. A student may receive both Honors 
in her department and one of the Distinction awards. 

Honors Work 

A student who has maintained a grade point average of 3.25 
in her major and related fields and a general grade point average 
of 3.0 during five semesters and who has shown ability for in- 
dependent study, may apply for permission to do honors work 
in her senior year. This project is equivalent to six semester hours 
(eight semester hours in the laboratory sciences) of course work 
in the major and may be carried on in an advanced seminar or 
under individual supervision by a faculty member, according to 
the decision of the Committee on Honors of the department con- 
cerned. 

To make application for honors study, the student must re- 
ceive approval from the department, to which she will first submit 
a statement of her aims in the work which she wishes to undertake. 
Since this application must be completed not later than May 1 
of her junior year, the student planning to do honors work 
should consult the departmental adviser early that year. 



Evidence of achievement in honors work will be shown by 
presenting to the departmental Committee on Honors a research 
thesis, a series of brief scholarly essays, or a creative project. If 
the committee approves, it may recommend that the student 
be awarded a degree with honors. If the committee does not 
regard the thesis, essays or project as deserving of honors recogni- 
tion, it will determine the grade to be given. 



A wards 

Colgate W. Darden, Jr., Award 

This award was established in 1960 in honor of Colgate W. 
Darden, Jr., who was president of the University of Virginia 
from 1947 to 1959. It consists of a medal, designed by Gaetano 
Cecere, formerly of the Art Department, and also a cash sum. 
It is presented to the senior having the highest academic average. 
This award was made in June, 1969, to Alice Berry Clagett 
of Upper Malboro, Maryland. 
The Thomas Jefferson Cup 

The Thomas Jefferson Cup is presented annually by the Alumnae 
Association at the Senior Convocation to that member of the 
graduating class who, during her years at Mary Washington Col- 
lege, has distinguished herself by academic achievement and out- 
standing service to the College. The award was established in 
1944 to commemorate the consolidation of Mary Washington 
College with the University of Virginia. 

This award was made in April, 1969, to Patricia Mae Boise 
of Westport, Connecticut, and Mary Page Williams of Marion, 
Virginia. 
Kiwanis Award 

Through the interest and generosity of the Fredericksburg 
Kiwanis Club, a silver bowl is awarded each year to the senior 
who, in the judgment of the faculty, has contributed most to the 
promotion of the interests of the College during her stay here. 
This award was made in April, 1969, to Patricia Mae Boise 
of Westport, Connecticut 
Alpha Phi Sigma Award 

The Alpha Phi Sigma honorary scholarship fraternity makes 
an annual award to the junior who made the highest academic 
average during her freshman and sophomore years. The presenta- 
tion is made at the Chancellor's Convocation at the opening of 
the session. 

This award was presented on September 18, 1969, to Betty 
Ruth Stokes of Martinsville, Virginia. 



69 



ACADEMIC 
INFORMATION 



70 



ACADEMIC 
INFORMATION 



Requirements For Graduation 

1. A candidate for a degree must complete a recognized major 
and earn 120 semester hours (in addition to four credits in 
physical education) and a minimum of 240 scholarship quality 
points. That is, the number of quality points must be at least 
twice the number of semester hours attempted to earn the minimum 
2.0 overall grade point average required for graduation. Only 
credits earned at Mary Washington College are used in computing 
a student's grade point average. Credit for courses taken elsewhere 
may be counted toward graduation but neither raises nor lowers 
academic standing at the College. 

2. The number of quality points earned in courses taken in the 
major subject to satisfy the requirements of the major program 
must also equal the required minimum overall 2.0 grade point 
average. 

3. A student failing to have the necessary number of scholarship 
quality points by the time she completes her degree requirements 
may take additional courses to make up the required number of 
quality points. All such courses, however, must first be approved 
by the Dean. 

4. A transfer student must also earn at least twice as many 
quality points as credit hours attempted in all work completed 
at Mary Washington. 

5. Responsibility for meeting the College and major department 
requirements for a degree rests with the student. 

6. An application for a degree must be filed in the Registrar's 
Office by the end of the second semester of the junior year. 

7. A total of at least two years of residence at Mary Washing- 
ton (four semesters) is required for a degree, and, except in the 
case of cooperative programs, the last semester of a student's 
work must also be done in residence at the College. At least 
eighteen semester hours in the major subject must be completed 
here. 

8. Correspondence courses are not accepted for transfer credit. 
Extension classes may be taken for credit only by permission of 
the Dean and the chairman of the department concerned. Under 
no circumstances may more than thirty hours of extension credit 
be counted toward a degree. 

9. Four credits in physical education are required for a degree. 
However, no more than four hours credit in activity courses are 
allowed. Students are urged to complete the required courses in 
physical education during their first two years of college, but may 
register for other courses for no-credit. 



Degrees Offered 

The College offers the degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor 
of Science, Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology, and 
Bachelor of Science in Physical Therapy. 

Requirements for the Degree of Bachelor of Arts 

One hundred and twenty-four semester hours of credit are 
required for the Bachelor of Arts degree, distributed as follows: 

Semester-Hours 
Basic Requirements 12 

English Composition and Literature 6 

Mathematics or Problems in Philosophy 6 

Area Requirements 44 

Language and Literature 18 

1. Foreign Language and Literature.... 12* 

2. English Literature Courses 6 

Natural Science 8 

Fine Arts: Art, Music, Dramatic Arts 6 

United States History or History of 

Civilization 6 73 

Economics, Geography, Political Science, nr^r* AAA 

Psychology, or Sociology (one field only) .. 6 FKUOKAM 

Major Program 36 OF STUDIES 

Major Subject 24 

Related Subjects (6 hours of the related subjects may be included 
in area requirements if permitted by the department in which 
the student is majoring.) 

Electives 28 

(Sufficient credits to total 120 semester hours) 

120 

Physical Education 4 

Total required for graduation** 124 

Courses counted toward fulfilling any of the basic or area re- 
quirements for a degree cannot be counted also as part of the 
major subject requirements. A major program in English, for ex- 
ample, must include at least 24 semester hours in that subject, 
in addition to the 12 semester hours required of all students. 



*18 required if the student begins with an elementary course; 6 required if 

she begins beyond the intermediate level. 

** Students must also meet quality point requirements (See pp. 64). 




74 

PROGRAM 
OF STUDIES 



Six of the 12 semester hours in related fields may, at the discretion 
of the departmental adviser, be included in the area requirements. 

The requirement of six hours in Mathematics or Problems in 
Philosophy should be met during the first or second year. Enroll- 
ment in Problems in Philosophy is limited to freshmen and sopho- 
mores. 

The requirement of six hours in Fine Arts normally should be 
met by taking Art History 111 plus one course from the sequence 
213, 214, 215, 216; Dramatic Arts 211-212, World Drama; or 
Music 111-112, Survey of Music. The English Literature courses 
are to be chosen from those numbered 231 or higher. 

Requirements for the Degree of Bachelor of Science 

The Bachelor of Science degree is available to students completing 
a major program in biology, chemistry, mathematics physics or 
psychology. Requirements are exactly the same as those for the 
Bachelor of Arts degree with two exceptions: 

(1) A modern foreign language (preferably German, French, 
or Russian) must be taken to satisfy the language requirement. 

(2) Instead of having a choice between mathematics and 
philosophy the student must complete six semester hours in 
mathematics. 

Requirements for the Degree of Bachelor of Science in 
Medical Technology 

The requirements for this degree are also the same as those for 
the Bachelor of Science degree, the specialized courses outlined in 
the curriculum on pages 85 to 87 constituting the major pro- 
gram. 

Requirements for the Degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Physical Therapy 

The requirements for this degree are also the same as those for 
the Bachelor of Science degree, the cooperative program and sug- 
gested curriculum listed on pages 87 to 89 constituting the major 
program. 



Major Program 

The major program usually includes 24 semester hours in the 
major subject and 12 semester hours in related subjects offered 
either in the major departments or in other departments. 

A major program leading to a degree may be chosen from any 
one of the following fields: 

Philosophy 

Physics 

Political Economy 

Political Science 

Pre-Foreign Service 

Psychology 

Religion 

Russian Studies 

Sociology 

Spanish 



American Studies French 

Art Geography and 
Asian Studies Geology 

Biology German 

Chemistry History 

Classical Latin 

Civilization Latin American 
Dance Studies 

Dramatic Arts and Mathematics 

Speech Music 
Economics 
English 

Detailed statements of the requirements for a major program 
in each of the above fields are given in the section of the cata- 
logue entitled "Course Offerings" (pp 95 to 178). There are also 
certain interdepartmental major programs which draw their courses 
from closely related fields. For the specific schedules of subjects, 
see pages 78 to 83. 

Near the end of her sophomore year, each student should apply 
to the departmental chairman or the interdepartmental program 
adviser concerned for permission to undertake a major. In granting 
this permission, the department will inform the student of the 
name of her major adviser, who will help her to outline a pro- 
gram of studies for the junior and senior year and to meet depart- 
ment requirements. 

Elective Courses 

In addition to courses in the major fields listed above, the 
student may elect to take courses in astronomy, in education, in 
foreign languages other than those offering a major. She may 
also apply for admission to the Liberal Arts Seminars. 

Twelve semester hours in vocational subjects, such as home 
economics and education, is the maxmum allowed for all stu- 
dents. 



75 



PROGRAM 
OF STUDIES 




Teaching 

Mary Washington does not confer professional degrees in Educa- 
tion. Students majoring in the various fields who wish to qualify 
for the Collegiate Professional Certificate may take the necessary 
courses as electives. (See pp 125 to 129 for sequence of courses 
leading to the Collegiate Professional Certificate.) 

Students who wish to qualify for teaching certificates should 
consult the requirements for certification in the state in which 
they expect to teach, in order that they may take the necessary 
courses. 



76 



PROGRAM 
OF STUDIES 



Preparation for Graduate Study 

A student contemplating graduate work should ascertain the 
requirements for advanced study in her field and should familiarize 
herself with the catalogues of specific graduate schools. As early 
as possible she should discuss her plans with her adviser, so that 
she may be guided in her program of studies. 

The student should normally select French or German to meet 
the undergraduate language requirements, and study both languages 
if she intends to pursue graduate work beyond the master's degree. 
In some fields Russian or one of the other languages may prove 
valuable as a second language choice. 

The Honors Program of the College offers the student experi- 
ence in independent study and research that may help to qualify 
her for a graduate scholarship, fellowship, or assistantship. A 
collection of recent announcements of such awards is available. 

The student who applies for admission to the graduate school 
of a university may be required to take either the Graduate Re- 
cord Examination or the Miller Analogy Test before her applica- 
tion is considered. Information concerning these examinations may 
be obtained from the Counseling Center. 

Foreign Languages 

Major programs are offered in French, German, Latin, and 
Spanish. Requirements for these major programs are listed with 
the course offerings, but students should consult members of the 
department before choosing courses in related fields. 

Students who choose a major program in a foreign language 
art expected to participate actively in the work of the departmental 
club promoting the use of that language. 

In addition to the major programs in Latin, French, Spanish 
and German, sequences of elective courses in Greek, Italian, 
Japanese, Portuguese, and Russian are also offered. Any of these 



languages, except Portuguese, may be selected in meeting the 
foreign language requirements for a degree. 

No credit is given for less than one full year of any foreign 
language. 

Credit for a single year in a foreign language will be allowed 
only if it is offered in addition to the degree requirements in 
foreign language or if it is a third-year course meeting the degree 
requirement. 

If credit for three years of foreign language is necessary to 
meet degree requirements, all three years must be taken in the same 
language. 

A student who has high school credit for two or three units 
in a foreign language will not receive college credit for a beginning 
course in that language. 

A student who has high school credit for four years in a foreign 
language will not receive college credit for an intermediate course 
in that language. 

Sequence of courses and prerequisite requirements must be strictly 
followed if credit is expected. 

Students who plan to continue the study of a language are 
urged to enroll in a course in that language in their first year 
at this college. Experience shows that interruption of continuous 
study may seriously affect progress in a language. 

Junior Year Abroad 

Mary Washington College participates in various junior year 
abroad programs. Students completing courses in programs ap- 
proved by the Dean of the College and the chairman of the de- 
partment of their major interest may receive appropriate credit 
toward a degree at Mary Washington. Further information may 
be obtained from the Dean of the College, 




77 

PROGRAM 
OF STUDIES 



Interdepartmental Majors 

Interdepartmental majors are offered in seven fields: (1) American 
Studies; (2) Asian Studies; (3) Classical Civilization; (4) Latin 
American Studies; (5) Pre-Foreign Service; (6) the Pre-Medical 
Sciences; and (7) Russian Studies. These comprehensive majors 
offer opportunity for a broader preparation in certain areas of 
study than that afforded by the existing departmental majors. 

Students who select an interdepartmental major are not re- 
quired to complete the customary departmental major, but they 
must fulfill all other requirements for a degree. (See pages 73 to 
74 for listing of required courses.) 

Since the curriculum for each interdepartmental major is organized 
in detail, students should plan their programs of study rather 
carefully in consultation with the adviser listed for the field. 



78 

PROGRAM 
OF STUDIES 



American Studies- Adviser: Mr. Glen R. Thomas 

The interdepartmental major in American Studies emphasizes 
as a foundation a balanced program in the following: 

1. American History 

2. Literature and Philosophy 

3. Social Sciences 

4. Fine Arts 

5. A knowledge of at least one non-American civilization. 



In addition to four required American Studies seminars, a 
mimimum of twenty-four hours in 300-400 level courses must be 
taken in a combination of these five areas. Beyond these basic 
requirements the program stresses flexibility in meeting the interests 
of the individual majors. A student may, according to her interests, 
concentrate in one of the above areas. 

The general requirements are exactly the same as those for the 
Bachelor of Arts degree. It is recommended, however, that pro- 
spective majors take Political Science 201-202 to satisfy the require- 
ment in social science. 



A major program requires that each student complete the four 
American Studies seminars in her junior and senior years. No 
two seminars may be taken concurrently. The remainder of the 
major program will be planned around the five areas that form the 
core of the major in close consultation with program adviser. 



Asian Studies -Adviser: Mr. Kurt F. Leidecker 



The Asian Studies major differs from the traditional inter- 
disciplinary majors both in subject matter and method of study. 
It is built around a core course which is so structured that any 
of its four components may also be taken for credit by students 
who are not majors in Asian Studies. 

The areas covered at present are South, Southeast, Central 
and East Asia. 

The general degree requirements are the same as those for the 
Bachelor of Arts, except that an Asian language and literature 
may be taken to satisfy the Foreign Language and Literature 
requirement, and Problems in Philosophy must be taken to 
satisfy the Mathematics or Philosophy requirement. 

The major program requires 36 credits of which 12 (or four 
times three) credits fall to the core course, 6 to language and 
literature, and 18 to the field of concentration or specialization. 
This leaves a minimum of 28 electives or a maximum of 46 
provided the student comes to Mary Washington with advanced 
standing in Language, English and History. 

Independent study, honors work, attendance at summer sessions 
of universities and institutes offering courses in the Asian field 
or Asian languages, and study abroad during the sophomore or 
junior year, particularly in the Orient, will be encouraged. Graduate 
study should not be ruled out as a continuation of the program 
offered at Mary Washington. 



79 

PROGRAM 
OF STUDIES 



Classical Civilization- Adviser: Mrs. Laura Sumner 

This interdepartmental major is centered in classical civiliza- 
tion and culture. Courses in the art, philosophy, history, and 
literature of ancient Greece and Rome constitute the basic require- 
ments. Either Latin or Greek must be taken in addition to a 
modern language, and both are recommended. 

The general requirements are exactly the same as those for the 
Bachelor of Arts degree, with these exceptions: 

(1) French, German, Latin, or Greek must be taken to satisfy 
the language requirement. 

(2) Philosophy 101-2 must be taken to satisfy the mathematics 
or philosophy requirement. 

(3) Art 111 and 213 must be taken to satisfy the fine arts 
requirement. 

A major program requires that a student earn forty-four 
credits in courses in classical civilization. 




Twelve credits, in addition to the credits used to fulfill the 
language requirement, in either Latin or Greek must be included 
in these hours. Other courses in ancient philosophy, art, civilization, 
archaeology will be worked out by the student and her adviser. 

Latin American Studies _ Adviser: Miss Mary Ellen 
Stephenson. 



80 

PROGRAM 
OF STUDIES 



A person wishing to major in Latin American studies must 
complete thirty-six hours which the director of the program and 
his committee accept as forming a coherent program concerned 
with Latin America. This program must include Readings and 
Research on Latin America (6 credits). The language require- 
ment of the college must be met with a language of Latin 
America. 

The above program is intended to give students interested 
in humanities and/or social sciences an opportunity to concentrate 
on the Latin American region. The one course, Readings and 
Research in Latin America, will be a seminar devoted to selected 
topics in art, architecture, economics, folklore, geography, history, 
literature, and politics of Latin America. 

Other courses would be drawn from among the following Latin 
American content courses: 

Geography: 334, 335 

History: 337, 358,451, 452 

Political Science: 351, 352 

Modern Foreign Languages: 
Portuguese 491 

Spanish 219-220, 228, 237, 239, 240 or 329, 320, 429, 430, 
431,432,491 

In addition, the committee could allow credit for other courses 
when the particular program of the student seemed to warrant its 
inclusion. 




Pre- Foreign Service- Advisers: Mr. Victor Fingerhut, Mr. 
Kurt F. Leidecker 

The interdepartmental major in Pre-Foreign Service is a lib- 
eral arts course in which the offerings of certain departments are 
regrouped in such a way that they will prepare a student wishing to 
work in one of the many agencies of the United States directly 
or after supplementary training, to enter a business firm overseas, 
to teach in a foreign country, to join the Peace Corps, to work 
for a domestic organization, institution or foundation having 
a foreign department, or to continue her language, area, or foreign 
relations studies at a graduate school. 

A student choosing this major should indicate her interest at 
the latest during the second semester of her freshman year. Great 
stress is laid on American backgrounds, international area studies, 
and particularly foreign languages. 

The general degree requirements are the same as for the Bachelor 
of Arts degree, with these qualifications: 

1. Philosophy 101-102 must be taken to satisfy the mathematics 
or philosophy requirement. 

2. The modern foreign language to be taken should be the 
one in which the student comes to Mary Washington College 
with some proficiency, as determined by the Department of 
Modern Foreign Languages. This does not preclude the 
possibility of taking up a second foreign language, pre- 
ferably in the sophomore year. 

3. Economics 201-202 or Political Science 201 and 202 must be 
taken to satisfy the social science requirement. 



81 

PROGRAM 
OF STUDIES 



82 



The major program requires that a student earn 54 credits in 
recommended courses in the following departments: 

Modern Languages 12 credits 

Geography 9 credits 

Political Science 6 or 9 credits 

Economics 9 or 6 credits 

History 6 credits 

Philosophy 6 credits 

English or Psychology or Sociology 6 credits 

Ten additional credits are to be selected from cognate courses 
in various departments, including those mentioned under the major 
program, in order to attain greater proficiency in certain fields. 
In the event that relevant special courses are announced, the 
candidate for a degree is expected to take them under this category. 

Special groupings of courses, depending on the type of foreign 
service the student wishes to enter, will be made upon consultation 
with the adviser and the department involved. 

At least one-third of all courses taken must be on the junior 
and senior levels. Engaging in independent study and participa- 
tion in honors work, the Liberal Arts Seminars, and the Junior 
Year Abroad are encouraged so as to intensify certain area studies. 



PROGRAM 
OF STUDIES 




Pre- Medical Sciences- Adviser: Mr. Thomas L. Johnson 

The interdepartmental major in the pre-medical sciences is de- 
signed as an undergraduate program for students planning to 
enter schools of medicine, dentistry, and medical technology. It 
provides a broader basis for further scientific study than the majors 
in biology or chemistry, but it does not replace majors in these 
fields. The general requirements are exactly the same as those for 
the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science degree with these 
exceptions: 

(1) French, German, or Russian must be taken to satisfy the 
language requirement. 

(2) Mathematics must be taken to satisfy the mathematics or 
philosophy requirement. 

(3) Psychology must be taken to satisfy the social science 
requirement. 

A major program requires that a student earn thirty-six credits 
in pre-medical courses. Twenty-eight of the required credits must 
be: 

Chemistry 211-212, Organic Chemistry 8 credits 

Chemistry 251, 252, Analytical Chemistry 8 credits 

Physics 101-102, General Physics 8 credits 

Biology 221, Chordate Anatomy 4 credits 

Eight additional credits are to be taken in courses selected from 
the following: 
Biology 
Chemistry 
Psychology 

The above program meets the course requirements for ad- 
mission to practically all the medical schools, including that of the 
University of Virginia. However, students are advised to consult 
the catalogue of the school which they wish to enter for detailed 
listings of requirements. With permission of the adviser the re- 
quirements listed above may be modified to meet the special 
requirements of particular schools. 

The program also meets the course requirements for entrance 
to approved schools for medical and clinical laboratory technicians. 
Recommended electives are bacteriology, embryology, parasitology, 
and other advanced courses in biology. Physical Chemistry is re- 
commended by many medical schools. 



83 

PROGRAM 
OF STUDIES 



Russian Studies— Adviser: Mr. Joseph Bozicevic 



84 

PROGRAM 
OF STUDIES 



The interdepartmental major in Russian Studies combines the 
study of Russian language and literature with cognate courses 
chosen from various departmental offerings in economics, political 
science, history, philosophy, and sociology. The general degree 
requirements are those for the Bachelor of Arts except that the 
Russian language must be taken to satisfy the foreign language 
requirement. 

The major program requires 36 credit hours: 

a) CORE COURSES (12 credit hours must be taken for a 
Russian Studies major): 

History 357, 358 History of Russia.... 6 credits 

Russian 377 Russian Literature in Translation- 

XIX Century 3 credits 

Russian 378 Russian Literature in Translation— 

XX Century 3 credits 

b) OTHER COURSES WITHIN MAJOR (minimum of 24 credit 
hours to be selected in addition to core courses) including: 

Economics 391 Comparative Economic Systems 3 credits 

History 493, 494 Special Studies in European History 6 credits 

Political Science 302 Comparative Government II 3 credits 

Political Science 361 Problems of Communism 3 credits 

Russian 371-372 Soviet Russian Literature (Selected 

readings in Russian) 6 credits 

Russian 491 Independent Study 6 credits 

Russian Honors 6 credits 

Russian Studies Seminar* 6 credits 

Sociology 492 Special Readings 3 credits 



*The content of the course will vary from semester to semester 
depending on the specialization of the instructor. 



Beyond the basic degree requirements and the 12 credits of core 
courses, the program remains flexible. A student may pursue 
her course of study concentrating on: 

a) Russian language and literature 

b) Social sciences 

c) A combination of courses from various relevant disciplines 
The major program is to be worked out in consultation with the 

Russian Studies adviser. 

Additional courses in Russian literature in translation including 
Pushkin, Tolstoy, Dostovesky, Gogol, Turgenev, Chekhov, Gorky, 
and others will be offered in subsequent years. 



Cooperative Programs 

Cooperative Program in Medical Technology— 
Adviser: Miss Rose Mary Johnson 

The College offers a degree program in Medical Technology in 
cooperation with the University of Virginia School of Medicine. 
The curriculum covers three sessions of academic work at Mary 
Washington College, followed by a twelve- month period of special- 
ized training in medical technology. 

On successful completion of the fourth academic year the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology will be awarded 
by Mary Washington College. After satisfactory completion of the 
twelve-month period at Charlottesville, the student will be eligible 
to take the examinations for registration and certification by the 
Board of Registry of Medical Technologists of the American 
Society of Clinical Pathologists. 

The number of students who can be admitted to the final twelve- 
month training period is limited by the facilities available. Ad- 
mission to the last two years of the program will be based upon 
scholastic record, demonstrated aptitude, and a personal inter- 
view by Medical School representatives. Application for the fourth 
year should be made about one year prior to entrance. After 
registration for the second semester of the junior year a transcript 
must be sent to the Registrar, Registry of Medical Technology, 
Muncie, Indiana, with $1.00 evaluation fee, for approval. The 
interview with Medical School representatives will follow. 

In the event that a student enrolled in this program should 
change her interest or not qualify for admission to the clinical 
laboratories, she may continue with the regular degree program 
at Mary Washington College and the courses she has taken may 
be applied to a major in biology or chemistry. 



85 

PROGRAM 
OF STUDIES 



Curriculum at Mary Washington College 



First Year 

English Composition and Literature courses 6 

Foreign Language 6 

Chemistry 111-112 8 

Mathematics 111-112 6 

Physical Education 2 

Total 28 



Second Year 

English: Sophomore Literature Courses 6 

Foreign Language 6 

Biology 121-122 8 

Chemistry 251-252 8 

History 101-102, History 111-112, or Fine Arts 6 

Physical Education 2 

Total 36 

Third Year* 

Foreign Language or Fine Arts 6 

Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, or Economics 6 

Biology 371 and other Biology 8 

Chemistry 4 

Fine Arts, History 101-102, History 111-112, or electives 6 

Total 30 



86 

PROGRAM 
OF STUDIES 



The program for the third year should be planned in consulta- 
tion with the faculty adviser. Total hours for the three years must 
be not less than 94. Other courses recommended if the student's 
program permits are Chemistry 311-312, Chemistry 317-318, 
Biology 331, Biology 372, Biology 382. 



Curriculum at University of Virginia School of Medicine 

Fourth Year 

Detailed outlines of the curriculum for the fourth year at the 
University of Virginia may be obtained from the institution. 

The tuition fee for the twelve-month training period at the Uni- 
versity of Virginia is $100.00. This does not include maintenance 
or uniforms. The following fees are also charged: comprehensive 
fee $122.00 and Women Students' Association fee, $3.00. En- 
rollees are registered as students of the University of Virginia in 
the Department of Medicine, and housing is available in Mary 
Munford Hall. (See University of Virginia catalogue for rates, 
etc.) 

The clinical laboratories of the University of Virginia School 
of Medicine are approved by the Board of Registry of the Ameri- 
can Society of Clinical Pathologists and by the Council on 
Medical Education and Hospitals of the American Medical 



Association. Students completing the program as outlined meet 
the requirements of the Registry of Medical Technologists. 

Students desiring to enroll in this program should make appli- 
cation to the Director of Admissions, Mary Washington College 
of the University of Virginia, Fredericksburg, Virginia. 



Cooperative Programs in Physical Therapy — 
Adviser: Miss Anna Scott Hoye 

There is a need for physical therapists (1) in the field of general 
medicine, neurology, orthopedics, and surgery; (2) for work with 
crippled children; and (3) for specialized services in the hospitals 
of the Army, Navy, and the Veterans Administration. 

Mary Washington College offers three courses of study for 
preparation of students in physical therapy. One provides two 
years of liberal arts work meeting the prerequisites of a third 
and fourth year of specialized training at any approved school of 
physical therapy which offers a two-year program. Upon satis- 
factory completion of the required work, the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in Physical Therapy will be awarded by the particular 
medical school attended. 

The second program provides for three years of liberal arts 
work at Mary Washington College and a fourth or fifth year of 
specialized training at any approved school of physical therapy 
which offers a one-year course. Upon satisfactory completion of 
the required program of study the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Physical Therapy will be awarded by Mary Washington College 
or by the particular medical school attended. 

The third program is one in which a student graduates from 
Mary Washington College with a major in some appropriate 
field. Post-baccalaureate work may then be taken at an approved 
school of physical therapy with the possibility of earning graduate 
credit to be applied toward a master's degree. All courses of study 
should be worked out in detail with the help of the curriculum 
adviser. 

A suggested outline for the first two years of study follows. 
Substitution may be made with approval of the curriculum 
adviser. It is recommended that as soon as possible, certainly 
before the end of the freshman year, the student should make 
known to the adviser which program she intends to follow and to 
which school she wishes to make application for professional 
training, in order that specific prerequisites may be met. 



87 

PROGRAM 
OF STUDIES 




PROGRAM 
OF STUDIES 



A list of physical therapy schools approved by the Council on 
Medical Education and Hospitals of the American Medical Associa- 
tion, together with their particular prerequisites for entrance, is 
made available to each student in the adviser's office. 

> 
Suggested curriculum at Mary Washington College: 

First Year 

English Composition and Literature Courses 6 

Mathematics 111-112, Mathematical Analysis 6 

Biology 121-122, Biological Concepts 8 

History 101-102, American History or History 111-112, 

History of Civilization 6 

Foreign Language 6 

Physical Education 2 

Total 34 

Second Year 

English: Sophomore Literature Courses 6 

Biology 337-338, Anatomy and Physiology 8 

Psychology 201 -202 , General Psychology 6 

Chemistry 111-112, General Chemistry 8 

Foreign Language 6 

Physical Education 2 

Total 36 



Orientation without credit is offered every year in the form of 
a professional Physical Therapy Club. All interested students may 
join and participate in the club's varied activities such as visits 
to nearby institutions, indoctrination lectures, moving pictures, 
etc. 

Directions for admission to Mary Washington College are to 
be found elsewhere in this catalogue. Application to the pro- 
fessional school is made at the end of the school year which 
precedes the last year of study at Mary Washington College. 

Cooperative Program In Nursing — 
Adviser: Miss Rebecca T. Woosley 



The Cooperative Program in Nursing between Mary Washington 
College and the School of Nursing, University of Virginia, is a 
four year curriculum leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Nursing. This program consists of prescribed lower division 
courses* prerequisite to the nursing major, and an upper division** 
nursing major. 

Required lower division courses are offered by Mary Washington 
College of the University of Virginia in Fredericksburg, Virginia. 
The upper division nursing major is offered by the School of 
Nursing, University of Virginia, in Charlottesville, Virginia. 
Satisfactory completion of this program qualifies the graduate for 
beginning positions in hospitals, clinics, doctors' offices, schools, 
industry, public health nursing and for commissions in military 
service. Most full-time students can complete this program in 
four semesters of study at Mary Washington College, one six-week 
summer session and four semesters at the School of Nursing, 
University of Virginia. 

Initial application for admission to this program is to be made 
to Mary Washington College. Appropriate application forms may 
be obtained from the Director of Admissions, Mary Washington 
College of the University of Virginia, Fredericksburg, Virginia 
22401. 

In order to insure appropriate academic advisement, students 
wishing to transfer from Mary Washington College to the School 
of Nursing, University of Virginia, for completion of this program 
should write to: Director of Admissions, School of Nursing, 
University of Virginia, McKim Hall, Charlottesville, Virginia 
22903, at the time of admission to Mary Washington College. 



89 

PROGRAM 
OF STUDIES 



*First and second year of the program. 
**Third and fourth year of the program. 



Candidates for admission to the School of Nursing must meet 
the following requirements: 

1 . Completion of the lower division courses of the cooperative 
program in nursing offered by Mary Washington College of 
the University of Virginia in Fredericksburg, Virginia. 
A cumulative grade point average of 2.00 on courses pre- 
requisite to the nursing major. 

Potential for scholarly achievement and development of 
professional qualities required of the nurse. 



2. 



3. 



Application Procedure 



90 



PROGRAM 
OF STUDIES 




During the fall semester of the second year at Mary Washington 
College, students who wish to transfer to the School of Nursing, 
University of Virginia, should request an application by writing 
to the Office of Admissions, The Rotunda, University of Virginia, 
Charlottesville, Virginia 22903. Completed applications must be 
received by the Office of Admissions by February 1 preceding the 
summer in which the student expects to enter the nursing program. 
The student is required to send or have the proper authority 
send the following to: 

Dean of Admissions 

The Rotunda, University of Virginia 

Charlottesville, Virginia 22903 

1 . A completed formal application with a recent photograph 
attached. 

2. A transcript of high school record or its equivalent. 

3 . Scores attained on the Scholastic Aptitude Test of the College 
Entrance Examination Board. 

4. A transcript of all college work. 

Curriculum at Mary Washington College 



1st. 2nd. 

First Year Sem. Sem. 

English 111-112, Composition and Reading 3 3 

Biology 121-122, General Biology 4 4 

Chemistry 111-112, General Chemistry 4 4 

History 101-102, American History or History 

111-112, History of Civilization 3 3 

*Physical Education 1 1 

Total 15 15 




Second Year 

English: Sophomore Literature Courses 3 3 

Psychology 201-202, General Psychology 3 3 

Sociology 201-202, Principles of Sociology, 

Social Problems 3 3 

Biology 37 1 , Bacteriology 4 

Home Economics 23 1 , Anatomy and Physiology 5 

*Physical Education 1 1 

Elective 2 

Total 17 17 



*No credit will be accepted for transfer for courses in Physical 
Education and Health. 



91 



Curriculum at the University of Virginia 



PROGRAM 
OF STUDIES 



Sem. Hrs. 
Summer Session Cr. 

Nursing I: Introduction to Health Care and Nursing 6 

The first course in the nursing major, Introduction to Health 
Care and Nursing, is offered in a six-week summer session on the 
Grounds of the University of Virginia. Students are required to 
complete all lower division work prerequisite to the nursing major 
before enrollment in Introduction to Health Care and Nursing. 



Sem. Hrs. 
Third Year Cr. 

Nursing 5 1 : Dynamics of Human Relations 2 

Nursing 53-55: Nursing Needs of Adults and Children 10 

Nursing 60: Interpersonal Relations in Nursing 3 

Nursing 62-64: Nursing Needs of Adults and Children 10 

Commerce 61: Principles of Organization and Management 3 

Electives (from areas other than Nursing) 3 



Fourth Year 

Nursing 81: Nursing Needs of Adults with Complex 

Medical-Surgical Problems 4 

Nursing 83: Nursing Needs of Patients with Emotional 

Illness 4 

Nursing 85: Nursing Needs of Child-bearing and Child- 
rearing Families with Complex Problems 4 

Nursing 89: Nursing Needs of the Community 4 

Nursing 91: Leadership in Nursing Practice 4 

Nursing 93: Independent Study 2 

Nursing 95: Nursing Elective 2 

Electives 6 

Total (Upper Division) 67 



92 

PROGRAM 
OF STUDIES 



After successful completion of the program, the student is 
eligible to write the examination for licensure as a registered 
professional nurse. 

Information concerning tuition, expenses, and terms of payment 
appears in the School of Nursing catalogue which can be obtained 
by writing the Director of Admissions, School of Nursing, Uni- 
versity of Virginia, McKim Hall, Charlottesville, Virginia 22903. 

Cooperative Program in Elementary Education — 
Adviser: Mrs. Catherine Hook 

Students who wish a more specialized preparation for teaching 
in the elementary grades than that offered at Mary Washington 
may enroll in a cooperative program for the preparation of 
elementary teachers leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science 
in Education at the University of Virginia. 

This program provides that the first two years of general 
academic work be taken at Mary Washington College and the third 
and fourth year, including both academic and professional work, 
be taken in the School of Education at the University of Vir- 
ginia, in Charlottesville. 

Students interested in the cooperative program sponsored by 
the University of Virginia and Mary Washington College should 
apply for admission to Mary Washington College stating their 
desire to take elementary education. Upon their enrollment, the 
School of Education at the University will be notified of the 
student's choice and the student's adviser at Mary Washington 
College, in cooperation with the Dean of that College and the 
Dean of the School of Education, will institute a program to help 
the student carry out the work successfully. 



Cooperative Program in Speech Pathology and 
Audio logy- Adviser: Mr. Albert G. Duke 

There is an increasing demand for teachers and clinical workers 
with special training in speech, including speech pathology and 
audiology. To supplement the major program in Dramatic Arts 
and Speech at Mary Washington College, a cooperative program 
has been established with the University of Virginia to provide 
a major program in speech pathology and audiology. 

This program provides that the first three years of work be 
taken at Mary Washington College and that the fourth year be 
spent in residence at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville. 
Students who transfer to Mary Washington College are required 
to spend two years in residence prior to their senior year at the 
University. Upon completion of the program at the University 
of Virginia the student receives a Bachelor of Arts degree from 
Mary Washington College, with a major in speech pathology and 
audiology. 

Students interested in the program should apply to the Director 
of Admissions, Mary Washington College. 

The Bachelor's degree does not signify that the recipient is 
fully prepared for clinical services to children and adults with 
language, speech, voice and hearing disorders, nor for professional 
certification from the American Speech and Hearing Association. 
The programs for the Master's degree in speech pathology and 
audiology are designed to satisfy academic requirements of the 
American Speech and Hearing Association for the Certificate of 
Clinical Competence in Speech Pathology and Audiology. 

A normal course of study for the cooperative program in 
speech pathology and audiology is as follows: 



93 

PROGRAM 
OF STUDIES 



Curriculum at Mary Washington College 

First Year Semester-hours 

English Composition and Literature Courses 6 

Foreign Language 6 

M athematics 6 

Natural Science 8 

Health Education 100, 101, Health 2 

Physical Education 2 

Total 30 



Second Year 

Semester-hours 

English: Sophomore Literature Courses 6 

Foreign Language* 6 

Speech 231-232, Oral Interpretation 6 

Psychology 201-202, General Psychology 6 

History 101-102, American History 6 

Physical Education 2 

Total 32 

*Students must complete six semester-hours of foreign language 
beyond the intermediate level. 
Third Year 

Fine Arts* 6 

Speech 421-422, Voice Science and Phonetics** 6 

Dramatic Arts and Speech 6 

Psychology 321, Child Psychology 3 

Elective (Psychology, Dramatic Arts or Speech) 3 

Psychology 311, Abnormal Psychology (Mental Hygiene) 3 
Social Science (History, Political Science, Economics, 

or Sociology) 6 

94 Total 33 

PROfR AM Curriculum at the University of Virginia 

TP>TF^ F ° Urtk YeaV Semester-hours 

Ur M UUlb>> Speech Education 108: Experimental Phonetics 3 

Speech Education 121: Rehabilitation Programs 

In Speech and Hearing 3 

Speech Education 131: Principles of Speech 

Correction 3 

Speech Education 132: Principles of Speech Pathology 3 

Speech Education 133: Diagnostic Techniques in 

Speech Pathology 3 

Speech Education 1 40: Articulation Disorders 3 

Speech Education 151: Introduction to Audiology 3 

Speech Education 153: Audiometry 3 

Speech Education 157: Aural Rehabilitation 3 

Electives 3 

Total 30 

Observation and Practice Facilities. As a part of the academic 
program in speech pathology and audiology, observation and 

*Dramatic Arts 211-212, World Drama, recommended. 

**Speech 421-422, Voice Science and Phonetics, is offered only 
in alternate years. If offered during a student's sophomore year, 
this course should be taken in place of Oral Interpretation, 
which should be deferred until the junior year. 




supervised practice are required. Opportunities for such are pro- 
vided by the Speech and Hearing Center and also through 
established working relationships with such facilities as the 
Charlottesville City and Albemarle County Public Schools, certain 
Departments of the University of Virginia Medical Center, the 
Children's Rehabilitation Center, the Virginia School for the Deaf 
and the Blind, the Woodrow Wilson Rehabilitation Center for 
adults, the Veterans Administration Hospital, and the Mobile 
Clinic of the Virginia Hearing and Speech Foundation, Inc. 



Internship Program for the Preparation of Teachers 

Through arrangements with the University of Virginia, a qualified 
Mary Washington College student may enter after graduation 
the Internship Program for the Preparation of Teachers. Students 
may prepare to teach in elementary schools, in special programs 
for exceptional children, or in any one of the following secondary 
school fields: 

Biology Latin 

Chemistry Mathematics 

English Music 

French Physics 

General Science Social Studies 

History Spanish 

At Mary Washington the student takes work to fulfill her 
major program and degree requirements. She completes all work 
in general and professional education that is required for Vir- 
ginia certification except Supervised Teaching. Immediately after 
graduation from Mary Washington the student enters the Summer 
Session of the School of Education at the University. She will take 
course work as further preparation for teaching her subject or 
grade level. In the fall she will be assigned to a cooperating school 
where she will have half of a teaching load, for which she will 
receive half salary. A cooperating teacher will be assigned by the 
school division to work with and help her. College supervisors 
will be in close communication with intern teachers, and seminars 



95 

PROGRAM 
OF STUDIES 



will be conducted periodically. During the intern year the student 
will be permitted to earn three graduate credits a semester, in 
addition to the six credits for the year she will earn for the intern 
teaching. After the year of intern teaching, the student may return 
to the University to complete the remaining work which leads to 
the award of a masters degree. 

Inquiries about the program should be directed to the Depart- 
ment of Education at Mary Washington College. Applications must 
be submitted to the Department of Education by May 15 of the 
student's junior year. Notification of acceptance will be made 
during the summer between the student's junior and senior year. 



96 

PROGRAM 

OF STUDIES 




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Nearly 500 courses in 23 disciplines are offered at Mary Washing- 
ton College each year. Included are course offerings in American 
Studies; Art/History of Art, Studio Art (Practice of Art); Asian 
Studies; Astronomy; Biology; Chemistry; Classics/ Greek, Latin, 
Classical Civilization; Dramatic Arts and Speech; Economics and 
Political Science; Education, and Recreation/ Health, Physical 
Education, Dance, Recreation; History; Home Economics; Liberal 
Arts Seminar; Mathematics; Modern Foreign Languages/ French, 
German, Italian, Portuguese, Russian, Spanish; Music; Philosophy; 
Physics; Psychology; Religion; and Sociology. 

Courses numbered from 100 to 199, inclusive, are usually 
regarded as first-year courses; 200 to 299, second-year courses; 
300-399, third-year courses; and 400-499, fourth-year courses. All 
course credits are expressed in semester hours. A course listed 
as "six credits" is a continuous course for the session of nine 
months and carries a credit of six semester hours. Courses listed 
as "three credits each semester" may be taken for a semester only 
if desired. 

Continuous courses, of which the student must complete both 
semesters to receive any credit, are indicated by hyphens between 
the numbers, such as Biology 121-122. 

Courses for which credit is given for either or both semesters 
are indicated by commas between the numbers, such as Art 
305, 306. 

Courses in which the first semester is not prerequisite for the 
second are indicated by a plus following the number, such as 
English 371, 372+ . 



99 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

American 
Studies 



AMERICAN STUDIES/ Associate Prof essor Glen R. Thomas, 
Adviser 

The following four seminars are designed specifically for Ameri- 
can Studies majors, and must be taken in their junior and senior 
years. These seminars will be open to students by permission of 
the instructor. 

American Studies Seminar 301- Regionalism. 

An inquiry into the cultural regions of the United States, covering such 
topics as the European heritage, ethnic and racial elements of the population, 
environmentalism, the growth of social institutions, the individual art forms, 
and the philosophy of regionalism. Three credits. 



American Studies Seminar 302— Darwin and Freud. 

A study of the impact of evolution and psychoanalytic theory upon Ameri- 
can thought, with special attention to literature, religion, sociology, and 
psychology. To be taken in the junior year. Three credits. 



American Studies Seminar 401 — The Impact of the American 

Experience on the Fine Arts in America. 

A Study of selected individuals and their work in the creative arts in the 
United States. The seminar will investigate whether or not there is a unique 
"American art" form. Three credits. 

American Studies Seminar 402— Mass Media and American Culture. 

A study of contemporary American culture through an analysis of mass 
media: television, popular music, popular theatre, best-sellers, movies, news- 
papers, advertising and sports. These popular expressions are to be examined 
as a means of illuminating American character, values, ideals and aspirations. 
Three credits. 

American Studies 490, 491 — Independent Study. 

Directed individual research on approved problems in American Studies. 
Three or six credits. 



100 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Art 



ART/ Professor Pauline G. King, Chairman; Professor Binford; 
Visiting Potter, Hara; Associate Professors Muick, Oliver; 
Assistant Professors Herban, Imai, Lamph; Instructors Celenko, 
Cohen. 

The Fine Arts requirement for the B. A. Degree may be 
satisfied, in this department, by taking Art History 111 plus one 
course elected from the sequence 213, 214, 215, and 216. Art 
111 and the 200 level course may not be taken concurrently. 

Two major programs are offered leading to the B.A. Degree: 
one in the History of Art, the other in Studio Art (Practice of 
Art). 

Courses in art history may be elected by non-majors, but in 
general they must have fulfilled the equivalent of the Fine Arts 
requirement for the B.A. degree. Those students entering from 
High School, Preparatory School, or transferring from another 
college, who feel they have had the equivalent of Art III, should 
consult the art history staff as to whether they may substitute 
another course. In exceptional cases, permission may be obtained 
from the Departmental Chairman and the Instructor of a given 
course, whenever the student has achieved sufficient competence 
to be able to deal with that course, although not necessarily 
with all advanced courses. In all cases, the completion of an 
advanced (300 or 400 level) art history course precludes receiving 
subsequent or concurrent credit for a lower (100 or 200) level 
course covering the same periods or subject matter areas. 

Courses in studio art may be elected by non-majors when they 
have completed the necessary prerequisites. Art 101-102, or its 
equivalent, is prerequisite for any 200 level course in studio art. 



Specific departmental prerequisites for each course must be adhered 
to. Advanced standing may be requested by entering majors or 
by non-major students who wish to elect studio art classes; 
decision will be made on the basis of previous courses taken, 
work submitted in portfolio, and conferences with the studio 
art staff. Photographs or slides of pottery and sculpture will be 
acceptable, if the student wishes to include work in these fields 
for consideration. 



History of Art Major: 

The student is required to take 30 credits beyond the Fine 
Arts requirement for the B.A. degree (Art 111 plus one course 
selected from the Sequence 213, 214, 215, and 216). However for 
art history majors these 200 level courses are prerequisite for 
advanced courses in corresponding periods or subject matter 
areas. In summary, 9 credits from the 200 level sequence are to be 
counted as part of the 30 credits in the major; 18 credits are to 
be selected from the art history courses on the 300 and 400 
level; and 3 credits must be taken in a research oriented course, 
one of the following: Art 485, Art 490, 491 , or Art 492. 

Students planning to do graduate work in art history are 
advised to take a second foreign language among their electives. 
A reading knowledge of both French and German is required 
for most graduate work in art history. 

In order to assure a well-rounded, liberal arts program, it is 
recommended that while the student is reviewing courses to fulfill 
the degree requirements for the remaining 34 hours of credit, 
in consultation with her adviser, she consider the following groups 
of suggestions: 

Foreign language (French or German) 

History courses (including History 111-112, if not already taken 
or unless the student has had World History in High School) 

Studio art courses 

Selections from the following, listed alphabetically: archaeology, 
Introduction to Anthropology, dramatic arts (211-212; 361-362), 
Liberal Arts Seminar, advanced courses in literature, music 
(history and literature), mythology, philosophy, and religion. 



101 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Art 



Studio Art Major: 

The student is required to take 24 credits in studio art more 
advanced than Art 100-102, and 12 credits in art history. Art 
101-102, or its equivalent is prerequisite for any 200 level course 
in studio art. Art History 111 plus one of the 200 level art 



history courses may be taken as part of the 12 credits required 
in the studio major; if so, the Fine Arts requirement for the 
B.A. degree may be satisfied by taking Music 111, 112, or 
Dramatic Arts 211-212. If a student has completed the college 
requirements for graduation and fulfilled the requirements for 
the major, she may elect additional studio art courses. 

A summary of the required sequence of courses is as follows: 
8-12 credits are to be selected from courses numbered on the 
200 level; at least 12 credits are to be selected from courses 
numbered on the 300-400 levels. 

Students expecting to teach art should see their adviser toward 
the end of the sophomore year, to be sure that state certification 
requirements may be met by scheduling the necessary departmental 
courses. In addition, Art Ed. 342 (listed under the Education 
Department), is required in the junior or senior year for the 
prospective art teacher; it must be taken before the student does 
student teaching. 

French, German, and Italian are the languages most useful 
for the studio art major, insofar as European travel or the 
ability to read the historical literature of the field are concerned. 



102 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Art 



Studio Art Courses 

Art 101— Two-dimensional Design. 

Experiments in the inventive use of materials, tools, and elements of 
design (e.g. line, shape, texture, value, color, etc.) as related to a two- 
dimensional surface. The use of figurative and non-figurative imagery in 
basic non-verbal communication. Given each semester. Two double periods 
per week. Two credits. 



Art 102— Three-deminsional Design. 

A development of three-dimensional structures, emphasizing the construction 
of visual order in space. Exercises and experiences will be provided showing 
the relationships between two-dimensional and three-dimensional design, 
through the use of such elements of design as texture, plane relationships, 
line and color, unity and variety of masses, etc. Both figurative and non- 
figurative subject-matter will be utilized. Two double periods per week. 
Two credits. 



Art 201 , 202+- Drawing. 

Prerequisite: Art 101-102 or its equivalent. Structural drawing of various 
forms with special emphasis on symmetrical and asymmetrical order, static 
and dynamic forces, space and time concept, harmonious and contrary unity. 
Three double periods per week. Two credits each semester. 



Art 211, 212+- Life Drawing. 

Prerequisite: Art 101-102 or its equivalent. A variety of approaches to the 
drawing of organic forms in figurative and non-figurative systems. Study of 
the human body from the live model in a progression from objective interpreta- 
tion to subjective expression. .Six hours per week. Two credits each semester. 

Art 231, 232+— Beginning Sculpture. 

Experience in principles of form and design. The study and construction 
of volume and mass through the use of plastic and carving media. Three 
double periods per week. Two credits each semester. 

Art 241, 242— Drawing and Composition. 

Prerequisite: Art 101-102, or its equivalent. Picture-making in various 
mediums; life drawing. Three double periods per week. Two credits each 
semester. 

Art 251, 252+- Pottery and Hand- Building. 

A concentrated study of the basic steps and forms of the pottery wheel; 
exploration of form and texture through various hand-building processes. 
Three double periods per week. Two credits each semester. 

Art 321- 322— Printmaking. 

Prerequisite: Art 101-102, and one year of drawing or its equivalent. An 
introduction to concepts, materials and methods used in printmaking: 
etching, engraving, aquatint and other intaglio techniques; collagraphy; 
lithography; relief processes; and serigraphy. Six hour per week. Two credits 
per semester. 

Art 341-342+— Intermediate Sculpture. 

Prerequisite: Art 231, 232, or its equivalent. Representational and non- 
representational projects. in a variety of media. Three double periods per 
week. Two credits each semester. 

Art 351- 352- Oil Painting. 

Prerequisite: Art 241, 242, or its equivalent. Still-life and figure painting 
in oils. Three double periods per week. Two credits each semester. 

Art 381- 382— Pottery and Hand-Building. 

Prerequisite: Art 251-252, or its equivalent. A more advanced study of 
wheel thrown forms; further exploration of hand-building processes; ceramic 
sculpture, and glaze experiments and firing. Three double periods per week. 
Two credits each semester. 



103 

COURSE 

OFFERINGS 

Art 



Art 401 , 402+— Figure Painting. 

Prerequisite: Art 351, 352, or its equivalent. Figure and portrait painting; 
landscape in the spring. Three double periods per week. Two credits each 
semester. 



Art 411, 412+— Advanced Sculpture. 

Prerequisite: Art 341, 342. The development of ideac and sketches to be 
executed in permanent materials. Three double periods per week. Two credits 
each semester. 

Art 475, 476, 477, 478+- Special Studies in Studio Art. 

A course designed to offer opportunity to the student who wishes to 
continue work, independently, in a field of her choice, but under the 
supervision of a member of the studio faculty. Three double periods per 
week. Two credits each semester. 

See also, Art Ed. 342 (listed under the Education Department). Seminar 
in Art Education. 

See also, Ed. 440— Supervised Teaching. 



104 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Art 



History of Art Courses 

Art 111— Introduction to the History of Art. 

Emphasis on certain monuments of Western art, concentrating on architec- 
ture, sculpture, and painting. Monuments to be considered in terms of the 
technical principles involved, their relationships to other works more freely 
selected by the instructor, and the probable aesthetic and cultural factors 
relevant to their creation. Three hours per week. Three credits. 

Art 213— Ancient Art. 

An introduction to the outstanding contributions made by the Near East, 
Greece and Rome to the formation of Western art. Three hours per week. 
Three credits. 

Art 214— Medieval Art. 

An assessment ofthe dominant contributions of Medieval Europe to Western 
art. Three hours per week. Three credits. 

Art 215— Renaissance and Baroque Art. 

An introduction to the art of the Renaissance and the Baroque with an 
emphasis on humanist trends. Three hours per week. Three credits. 

Art 216— Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Art. 

A study of the stylistic and technical developments necessary to an under- 
standing of modern art. Three hours per week. Three credits. 

Art 310— Art of the Near East. 

Egypt, the Near East, and the Aegean world with emphasis on cultural 
exchange during the Bronze Age. Three hours per week. Three credits. 



Art 31 1 - Classical A rt. 

The development of Hellenic art and subsequent developments through 
Etruscan and Roman art. Three hours per week. Three credits. 



Art 312- Early Medieval Art (circa 250-1050). 

Concentration on the study and development of early Christian, Byzantine, 
and Pre-Romanesque art. Introductory discussions on their emergence from 
the artx and civilization of late antiquity. Three periods per week. Three 
credits. 

Art 313- Later Medieval Art (circa 1050-1400). 

At the beginning, a survey of the arts of the late eleventh century; course 
concentration on the emergence and development of Romanesque and Gothic 
art, ending with the court styles of the fourteenth century and the transition 
to the renaissance. Three periods per week. Three credits. 

Art 315— Seventeenth Century Art. 

Emphasis on the Carracci and Caravaggio; Bernini and Borromini; Rubens, 
Rembrandt, and the Dutch landscapists; Poussin and Claude; palace and 
garden design; Velasquez; the Baroque ceiling. Concurrent emphasis on 
"the Baroque" as it evolves from "Mannerism," changes in subject matter 
and technique. Three hours per week. Three credits. 



Art 316— Eighteenth Century Art. 

Emphasis on French Rococo, its derivations and influences on Continental 
and British art; the evolution of its forms into the Neo-Classic; the tendencies 
leading toward romanticism and industrialization. Consideration of the decora- 
tive arts as evidence of stylistic change wherever relevant. Three periods per 
week. Three credits. 

Art 317— Northern Art. 

Painting and praphics of the Lowlands, France and Germany from the 
late medieval period through the early sixteenth century. Three periods 
per week. Three credits. 



105 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Art 



Art 318— Italian Renaissance Art. 

Art of the Italian Renaissance and its origins in the social and intellectual 
climate, with emphasis on painting. Three periods per week. Three credits. 

Art 31 9— Italian Renaissance Architecture and Sculpture. 

A treatment of the historic, aesthetic, and theoretical bases for these arts, 
in the 15th and 16th centuries. Landscape design and city planning as 
settings will be dealt with where relevant. Three periods per week. Three 
credits. 

Art 335— The Art of Primitive Peoples. 

An introduction to the arts of the three major art-producing areas of the 
primitive world: Negro Africa, Oceania, and North America, but with the 
emphasis upon Africa. While examples of architecture and painting are 
discussed, sculpture is stressed. Three periods per week. Three credits. 



Art 391— Georgian Art. 

A study of British art and aesthetics, largely of the eighteenth century, 



stressing not only portraiture and Palladianism, but the rise of exoticism 
and nostalgia which show Britain to be the cradle of Romanticism. Three 
periods per week. Three credits. 

Art 451 — Nineteenth Century Art. 

Emphasis on French painting and sculpture with some aspects of these 
arts in other European countries included. The course covers the movements 
of Classicism, Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism and Post-Impressionism. 
Three periods per week. Three credits. 

Art 452— Twentieth Century Art. 

A survey of the painting and sculpture of Europe and the United States. 
Three hours per week. Three credits. 

Art 453— Modern Architecture. 

A study of the outstanding changes in form, style, and technology, with 
reference to their historical sources and to the individuals who have made 
lasting contributions. Three credits. 

Art 481— American Art. 

A survey of American art from its beginnings to the present. Three credits. 



106 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Asian 
Studies 



Art 485— Research in the History of Art. 

Intensive reading, study and discussion emphasizing specific artists, move- 
ments or aspects of art. To be conducted as a seminar. Three periods 
per week. Three credits. Staff. Enrollment by permission of the instructors, 
but required of all art history majors. 

Art 490, 491— Independent Study. 

Individual study under the direction of a member of the art history 
staff. Three credits each semester. (By permission of the department, on the 
basis of a presentation by the student of her problem, and a description of 
her method of approach, accompanied by an indication of the part to be 
played by the art history staff member.) 



Art 492— Special Studies in Art History. 
Open to all art history majors and otherwise qualified students of junior 
and senior status who desire a special course in an area of art history 
previously selected by the department after consultation with the students. 
The emphasis will be on specific problems or limited periods in art history. 
Three hours per week. Three credits. 

ASIAN STUDIES/ Professor Kurt F. Leidecker, Adviser. 



The Asian Studies core course has four components of which the 
first one is prerequisite to the rest. Majors are required to take 
the full sequence; all other students may take as many as they 
wish. 



Asian Studies I— Languages and Modes of Thought in the Orient 
The major languages of the region are presented— wherever possible by 
specialists— with emphasis on their written, phonetic, linguistic and semantic 
features in order to obtain an insight into the thinking and behavioral 
patterns of the people speaking these languages. Three credits. 

Asian Studies II— The Religions of the Orient from Animism to 

Metalogical Systems. 

Man's quest in the Orient for support, comfort and meaning to his 
existence by searching for and evolving religious concepts is traced in the 
context of greatly diversified cultures and civilizations as well as natural 
environments. Three credits. 

Asian Studies HI— The Peoplehood of Orientals 

Various tribes, ethnic groups and nationalities in the region are studied as 
to their customary and ethical behavior, their awareness of individual and 
social values, their outlook on life and interpeople relations. Three credits. 

Asian Studies IV— Values and Ideologies in the Cultures of the Orient. 

A determination of the origin, growth, and realization of the ideals of 
Eastern peoples and their phenomenological expressions in literature as well 
as the static and performing arts. Three credits. 

The following courses offered by different Departments are within 
the scope of Asian Studies. 

History of Art 310— Near Eastern Art Through the Bronze Age. Three 
credits. 

Dramatic Arts 371 — Oriental Theatre. Three credits 

Political Science 354— Politics of South Asia. Three credits. 

Political Science 355— Politics of North Africa and the Middle East. 
Three credits. 

Geography 331 — Geography of Asia. Three credits. 

Geography 462— Political Geography (Geopolitics). Three credits. 

Dance 332— Ethnic Dance of Eastern Cultures. Two credits. 

History 371, 372— East Asian Civilization. Three credits each semester. 

History 375— History of Modern China and Japan. Three credits. 

History 361— Modern Southeast Asia. Three credits. 

Japanese 181-2— Beginning Japanese Six credits. 



107 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Asian 
Studies 



Japanese 183-4— Intermediate Japanese. Six credits. 
Philosophy 311— Philosophies of India. Three credits. 



Philosophy 312— Philosophies of China and Japan. Three cred 



its. 



Philosophy 313- The Philosophy of Buddhism. Three credits. 



108 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Astronomy 
Biology 



Philosophy 352-Ph ilosophy East and West. Three credits. 

ASTRONOMY /Instructor Druzbick 

Astronomy 361,362— Elementary Astronomy. 

An historical and descriptive survey of the physical universe. Three periods 
a week. Three credits each semester. Astronomy 361 is prerequisite to Astro- 
nomy 362. Mr. Druzbick. 

BIOLOGY/ Professor William C. Pinschmidt, Jr., Chairman; 
Professors Black , Hoye; Associate Prof essors R. M. Johnson , T. L. 
Johnson, Parrish; Assistant Professors Friedman, M. W. Pinsch- 
midt; Instructors Bass, Wilfong. 

Biology 121-122— Biological Concepts, is prerequisite to all advanced 
courses in biology except by special permission. Students who 
plan to major in Biology should complete Chemistry 111-112, 
General Chemistry, and Mathematics 1 1 1-1 12, Mathematical Analy- 
sis, by the end of the sophomore year. Physics 101-102, General 
Physics, is also recommended. The major program must include 
twenty-four hours or more of courses more advanced than 
Biology 121-122. The program should include courses from as 
many as possible of the following areas: Botany, Ecology or 
Marine Biology, Embryology, Genetics, Chordate Anatomy or 
Histology, Invertebrate Zoology or Parasitology, and Physiology 
or Biochemistry. At least one semester of Biology 450, Seminar, 
is required during the junior or senior year. A student who 
intends to major in biology should arrange a four-year program 
in consultation with a member of the biology faculty. 

Biology 121- 122- Biological Concepts. 

General biological principles as they apply to plants and animals. One 
three-hour and three single periods a week. Eight credits. 

Biology 211— plant Ecology. 

A study of basic ecological principles as applied to plants including major 
biomes, plant succession, competition and micro-macro-environments. Two 
single and two double periods a week for the first semester. Four credits. 

Biology 2\l-Plant Physiology. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 111-112, General Chemistry. Experimental and 
theoretical treatment of the functional aspects of plants. Two single and two 
double periods a week for the second semester. Four credits. 



Biology 221— Chordate Anatomy. 

A comparative study of the major systems of representative chordates. 
Two single and two double periods a week for the first semester. Four 
credits. 

Biology 231— Botany. 

A survey of the plant kingdom with emphasis on morphogenetic description, 
life histories and evolutionary relationships. Two single and two double 
periods a week for the first semester. Four credits. 

Biology 241— Invertebrate Zoology. 

A survey of the invertebrate phyla with emphasis on structural char- 
acteristics, life cycles, and evolutionary relationships. Two single and two 
double periods a week for the first semester. Four credits. 

Biology 322— Animal Ecology. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 111-112, General Chemistry. The relationships 
between animals and their environments. Field trips and laboratory studies 
include observations of marine, fresh-water, and terrestrial animals in their 
natural habitats. Two single periods and six hours of laboratory or field work 
a week for the second semester. Four credits. 



Biology 331— Vertebrate Histology. 

The preparation and study of animal tissues. Two single and two double 
periods a week for the first semester. Four credits. 

Biology 332— Chordate Embryology. 

The development of representative chordates. Two single and two double 
periods a week for the second semester. Four credits. 



109 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Biology 



Biology 337— Human Anatomy. 

Gross structure of the human body. Two single and two double periods 
a week for the first semester. Four credits. 

Biology 338— Human Physiology. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 111-112. General Chemistry. Functional aspects of 
the human organism. Two single and two double periods a week for the 
second semester. Four credits. 

Biology 341- Evolution and Genetics. 

A course designed for non-majors. History of evolutionary thought and 
genetic principles. Three single periods a week for the first semester. Three 
credits. 



Biology 360- Cellular Physiology. 

Prerequisite or corequisite: one advanced course in Chemistry. Principles 
of general and cellular physiology. Two single and two double periods a week 
for the second semester. Four credits. 




Biology 371- Microbiology. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 111-112, General Chemistry. A survey of micro- 
organisms with emphasis on the bacteria, designed to introduce the student 
to the morphology, physiology, and clinical aspects of the field. Two single 
and two double periods a week for either semester. Four credits. 

Biology 372— Parasitology. 

The structure, life cycles, and host relationships of invertebrate parasitic 
forms. Two single and two double periods a week for the second semester. 
Four credits. 



110 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Biology 



Biology 382— Human Anatomy and Physiology. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 111-112, General Chemistry. A course designed for 
students in the cooperative programs in nursing and medical technology. 
Structure and function of the human organism. Three single and two double 
periods a week for either semester. Five credits. 

Biology- Psychology 392— Behavior Genetics. 

Prerequisite: One year of biology and one year of psychology. The relation- 
ship between heredity and behavior of organisms including man; an examina- 
tion of the relations between mechanisms of genetic transmission and gene 
action, population structure and evolution, and individual behavior differences. 
Three single periods a week for the second semester. Three credits. 



Biology 441— Genetics. 

Mendelian inheritance and modern concepts of gene structure and function. 
Two single and two double periods a week for the second semester. Four 
credits. 

Biology 450— Seminar. 

Selected readings, reports, and group discussions on topics of historical 
and current biological interest. Open to majors each semester of the junior 
and senior years. At least one semester is required during the junior and/or 
senior year. One credit. 



Biology 475— Readings in the Biological Sciences. 

Independent readings in current or classical biological literature in a field 
selected by the student. The student is guided by and responsible to a member 



of the staff. Open, each semester, to junior and senior majors with permission 
of the staff. Two credits. 

Biology 476- Special Problems in Biology. 

Prerequisite: Biology 475. A program of independent laboratory or field 
investigation for which the student has reviewed the literature and organized 
her approach in the prerequisite course. The student is guided by and 
responsible to a member of the staff. Open, second semester, to junior and 
senior majors with permission of the staff. Three credits. 

Biology 490, 491— Research. 

Four credits each semester. (See statement on honors). 



Honors in Biology 

1. To be eligible, a student must have a 3.25 grade point average 
in biology and a 3.0 over-all average for five semesters. Such 
a qualified student, in order to become an applicant, must have 
the approval of the Department of Biology by the end of the 
first semester of her junior year. 

2. Biology 475, Readings in Biology, or its equivalent (taken 
in the second semester of the junior year) will be a prerequisite 
for Honors work. 

3. The approved student must register for Biology 490, 491, 
Research. A grade of C or less will be given in this course if the 
Honors Committee decides that the work is not worthy of honors. 

4. The chairman of the department will select an Honors Com- 
mittee composed of three staff members one of which will be the 
student's advisor for the honors project. The advisor will guide the 
student in her study and determine the most suitable combination 
of laboratory work and reading for optimum progress toward the 
student's goal. This advisor will also direct the writing of a thesis 
and supervise the oral examination. 

CHEMISTRY/ Professor Lawrence A. Wishner, Chairman; Pro- 
fessors Cover, Insley; Associate Professor Mahoney; Assistant 
Professors Crissman, George; Assistant Instructor Sotzing. 

A student who intends to major in chemistry should arrange 
a four-year program in consultation with a member of the chemis- 
try faculty. Chemistry 211, 212,393,394,451 and 452 are required 
for a major program in chemistry. Chemistry 1 1 1-1 12 is prerequisite 
to all other chemistry courses. Mathematics 1 1 1-1 12 is recommended 
for the freshman year. Mathematics 211-212 and Physics 151-152 
should be taken before the junior year. French, German, or Russian 
are recommended to fulfill the foreign language requirement. 



Ill 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Chemistry 



112 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Chemistry 



An honors program consisting of independent research leading 
to the preparation of a thesis is offered to qualified students 
for eight credits during the senior year. 

Chemistry 111-112— General Chemistry. 

A course designed to introduce the student to the fundamental principles 
of chemistry and the more important elements and their compounds. One 
three-hour and three single periods a week. Eight credits. 

Chemistry 211, 212- Organic Chemistry. 

A study of the chemistry of carbon compounds on the basis of structural 
theory. One three-hour and three single periods a week. Four credits each 
semester. 

Chemistry 251, 252- Analytical Chemistry. 

Prerequisite or corequisite: Mathematics 111-112. The first semester consists 
of an elaboration of the principles of chemistry with particular emphasis 
on chemical equilibrium. In the accompanying qualitative analysis laboratory, 
semi-micro techniques are employed. The second semester consists of the 
theory and techniques of volumetric, gravimetric, and introductory instru- 
mental analysis. Two single and two three-hour periods a week. Four credits 
each semester. 

Chemistry 317, 318— Biochemistry. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 212. The application of chemical principles to the 
study of living cells and organisms. The laboratory deals with selected research 

techniques. Three lectures and three laboratory hours a week. Four credits each 
semester. 

Chemistry 333— Advanced Analytical Chemistry I. 

Prerequisites: Chemistry 251, 252. A study of advanced volumetric and 
gravimetric analytical techniques with emphasis on electrochemical and optical 
methods of analysis. One single and two three-hour periods a week. First 
semester. Four credits. 

Chemistry 343, 344— Advanced Inorganic Chemistry. 

The study of modern theories of atomic structure and chemical bonding 
and their application to molecular structure, coordination chemistry, and 
metallic structure. Three single periods a week. Three credits each semester. 



Chemistry 393, 394— Physical Chemistry. 

Prerequisites: Mathematics 211-212, Physics 151-152, Chemistry 251-252. 
A study of the thermodynamic, kinetic statistical, and quantum mechanical 
properties of chemical systems. The laboratory portion of the course will deal 
with physiochemical determinations and the statistical treatment of experi- 
mental results. Three single and two three-hour periods a week. Five credits 
each semester. 



Chemistry 411— Advanced Organic Chemistry. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 212. The study of organic reaction mechanisms and 
the relation of molecular structure to physical and chemical properties. Three 
single periods a week. First semester. Three credits. 

Chemistry 414— Identification of Organic Compounds. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 212. A study of the use of chemical and spectro- 
scopic methods in the qualitative analysis of organic compunds. One single 
and two three-hour periods a week. Second semester. Three credits. 

Chemistry 434— Advanced Analytical Chemistry II. 

Prerequisite or corequisite: Chemistry 394. A study of the theory and ap- 
plication of modern analytical methods as applied to the solution of structural 
and mechanistic problems. Topics include spectrochemical and electrochemical 
analysis, mass spectrometry, chemical separations, and computer data pro- 
cessing. One four-hour and three single periods a week. Second semester. 
Four credits. 



Chemistry 451, 452+- Seminar. 

Student preparation of reports on selected topics in chemistry for oral 
presentation and discussion. One hour a week. Required of all chemistry 
majors in senior year. Others admitted by permission of the chemistry 
department. One credit each semester. 

Chemistry 455, 456— Special Problems in Chemistry. 

A program of independent investigation under the direction of a member 
of the staff. Open to qualified students with the permission of the depart- 
ment. From one to four credits per semester depending upon the quantity of 
work planned. 



113 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Classics 



Chemistry 493— Advanced Physical Chemistry. 

Prerequisite: Chemistry 394. An advanced treatment of selected topics in 
thermodynamics, kinetics, photochemistry, and quantum chemistry. Three 
single periods a week. First semester. Three credits. 



CLASSICS/ Professor Laura V. Sumner, Chariman; Assistant 
Professors Jones, Sherwood. 

The Department of Classics offers a major program in Latin. 
The interdepartmental major in Classical Civilization is also closely 
allied to the work in the department. 

Students who select a major program in Latin must take thirty- 
six credits in Latin and related subjects. All students are required 
to take Latin 351, Advanced Latin Grammar. A student who 
plans to attend graduate school is expected to take Greek and 
should plan for it early enough in her program to allow at least 
two years to be taken. The thirty-six hours are to be distributed 
in the following manner: 



For students who enter college with three or four units of high 
school Latin: 

1. Twenty-five credits in Latin selected from the 300 and 400 
levels, including Latin 351. 

2. In related fields, twelve credits to be selected in consulta- 
tion with her major adviser. 

For students who enter college with one or two units of high 
school Latin: 

1. Twenty-five credits in Latin, not including Latin 113-114, 
with at least eighteen credits selected from the 300 and 400 
levels, including Latin 351. 

2. In related fields, twelve credits to be selected in consultation 
with her major adviser. 

For students who start Latin in college: 

1. Twenty-five credits, not including Latin 111-112, with at 
least twelve credits in Latin selected from the 300 and 400 
level, including Latin 351. 

2. In related fields, twelve credits to be selected in consultation 
with her major adviser. 



114 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Classics 



Greek 
Greek 131-132- Elementary Greek. 

Grammar; composition; Nairn and Nairn Greek through Reading. Three 
periods a week. Six credits. 

Greek 133- 134- Intermediate Greek. 

Prerequisite: Greek 131-132 or two years of high school credit. Composition 
in North and Hillard Greek Prose Composition; reading of Thucydides, 
Athenian Disaster in Sicily; Plato, Apology, Homer, Odyssey Book 9. Three 
periods a week. Six credits. 



The following courses are offered whenever there is sufficient demand. 

Greek 231- 232- 

Prerequisite: Greek 133-134. Herodotus. Histories Book 6 (selections); 
Homer, Iliad Book 1; Thucydides, Book 2 (selections); composition. Three 
periods a week. Six credits. 

Greek 331-332- 

Prerequisite: Greek 231-232. Aeschylus, Agamemnon; Aristotle, Ethics 
(selections); Demosthenes, First Phillipic (selections). Three periods a week. 
Six credits. 



Greek 431-432- 

Prerequisite: Greek 231-232. Plato, Republic Books 1-2, 6-7. Three periods 
a week. Six credits. 



Latin 

Latin 111-112— Elementary Latin. 

For students who enter college with no training in Latin or with fewer 
than two units in high school Latin. The essentials of Latin grammar and 
composition; translations from Caesar and other writers. Three periods a week. 
Six credits. 

Latin 113-114— Intermediate Latin. 

Prerequisite: Latin 111-112 or two units of high school Latin. Readings 
from Cicero (orations, letters, essays), Pliny, and later writers; Virgil's 
Aeneid (Books I-VI); forms and syntax. Three periods a week. Six credits. 



Latin 211-212— Survey of Latin Literature. 

Prerequisite: Latin 113-114 or four units of high school Latin. Students 
who have three units of high school Latin should consult the chairman of 
the department before registering for any Latin course. A survey of the great 
periods of Latin literature with readings from the representative works in 
drama, poetry, history, and letters. Three periods a week. Three credits each 
semester. 

Latin 213, 214- Medieval Latin. 

Prerequisite: Latin 113-114 or comparable high school preparation. May 
be elected as 300 level course with approval of professor and chairman of 
department. Three periods a week. Three or six credits. (Not offered in 
1970-71). 

Latin 31 1 — Roman Drama. 

Prerequisite: Latin 211-212. Astudy of the Roman theatre, Plautus, Terence, 
and Seneca. Three periods a week. First semester. Three credits. (Not offered 
in 1970-71). 



115 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Classics 



Latin 312— Roman Satire. 

Prerequisite: Latin 211-212. The development of satire in Latin literature. 
Lucilius, Horace, Phaedrus, Seneca, Petronius, Persius, Martial, Juvenal. 
Three periods a week. Second semester. Three credits. 

Latin 315— Roman Historians. 

Prerequisite: Latin 211-212. Roman historical writing. Sallust, Caesar, 
Livy, Tacitus. Three periods a week. First semester. Three credits. 

Latin 316— Epic Poetry. 

Prerequisite: Latin 211-212. Three developments of the epic in Latin. 
Lucretius, Vergil, Lucan. Three periods a week. Second semester. Three 
credits. (Not offered in 1970-71). 



Latin 351, 352- 

Advanced Latin Grammar and Prose Composition. May be elected for 
one credit each semester. Recommended for all majors who plan to teach. 



Latin 41 1 — The Ciceronian Age. 

Prerequisite: Latin 211-212. Roman life and letters in the last years of the 
Roman Republic. Cicero, Caesar, Catullus, Lucretius, Livy. Three periods a 
week. First semester. Three credits. 

Latin 412— The Silver Age of Latin Literature. 

Prerequisite: Latin 211-212. A study of the writers of the first and second 
centuries A.D. Special attention is given to Pliny the Younger, Quintilian, 
Statius, and Apuleius. Three periods a week. Second Semester. Three credits. 
(Not offered in 1970-71). 



116 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Classics 



Latin 451, 452— Special studies in Latin Literature. 

This course will offer an opportunity for reading and study of an in- 
dependent nature. The subject matter will be worked out in advance by the 
faculty member in charge for a given semester in consultation with the stu- 
dents. Open only to junior and senior major students (or to other qualified 
advanced students) who have completed Latin 211-212 and at least one 
course at a 300 or 400 level. Three credits each semester. May be elected 
for as many as six succeeding semesters. 

Latin 491, 492— Independent Study. 

A junior or senior major, in consultation with and with permission of her 
adviser and the Chairman of the Department may elect up to six hours of 
Independent Study. 



Classical Civilization 



Classics 201 — Greek Literature in Translation. 

No prerequisite. Reading in English translation from the major Greek 
writers from Homer through the Greek writers of the Roman period. This 
course cannot be used to fulfill the language requirement. Three periods a 
week. Three credits. 






Classics 202— Latin Literature in Translation. 

No prerequisite. Readings in English translation from the major Latin 
writers. This course cannot be used to fulfill the language requirements. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. 

Classics 301 — Mythology. 

No prerequisite. A study of the principal myths in classical writers with 
emphasis on their influence on literature and art in contemporary and later 
periods. This course cannot be used to fulfill the language requirement. 
Three hours a week. Three credits. 



Classics 331— Greek Civilization. 

(May be elected as History 231.) See History Department listing. Thi 
periods a week. Three credits. 



Classics 332— Roman Civilization. 

(May be elected as History 232.) See History Department listing. Three 
periods a week. Three credits. 

Classics 385— Greek Art and Archaeology. 

No prerequisite. A survey of archaeology in Greece and a general study 
of archaeological methods. A study of Aegean and Greek sculpture, painting, 
architectural, and minor arts from the prehistoric periods through the 
Hellenistic age. Three periods a week. Three credits. 

Classics 386— Roman Art and Archaeology. 

No prerequisite. A survey of Roman archaeology and a general study of 
archaeological methods. A study of Italic, Etruscan, and Roman sculpture, 
painting, architecture, and minor arts from earliest times through the late 
Roman empire. Three periods a week. Three credits. 

Classics 401, 402— Special Studies in Classical Archaeology. 

Prerequisites: Classics (Art) 385 and 386; some knowledge of Latin and/or 
Greek. Work of the first semester will concentrate on modern archaeological 
techniques; preservation and restoration of finds; introduction to Greek 
and Roman epigraphy. Second semester work will concentrate on Greek 
and Roman numismatics; special studies in Greek and Roman pottery; the 
problems of artifacts and minor arts. Permission of the instructor required. 
Two periods a week. Two credits each semester. (Not offered in 1970-71). 



DRAMATIC ARTS AND SPEECH/ Professor Albert R. Klein, 
Chairman; Professor Duke; Assistant Professor Turgeon. In- 
structor Wright. 

The major program in dramatic arts and speech requires 
thirty-six credit hours selected from courses in this department, 
but as many as twelve hours may be selected in related fields. 
Related fields should be selected from the areas of language, 
literature, history, science, art, music, psychology, or philosophy in 
consultation with the student's adviser. 

A major program in speech pathology and audiology is offered 
in cooperation with the University of Virginia. (See page 93.) 



117 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Dramatic Arts 

and 

Speech 



Dramatic Arts 211, 212- World Drama. 

A study of selected plays and theatrical developments in ancient and modern 
civilizations. Theatre excursions may be arranged. Three periods a week. 
Three credits each semester. 

Dramatic Arts 311, 312- Stagecraft. 

Construction and design of play production, including theatre design, 
staging, lighting, and sound effects, with practical application in College 
Theatre. One single and two double periods a week. Three credits each semes- 
ter. 



Dramatic Arts 321, 322— Acting. 

General principles of acting; elementary work in voice and pantomine; 



118 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Dramatic Arts 

and 

Speech 



development and characterization; advanced problems in rehearsal and public 
performance. Two one-and-one half periods a week. Three credits each semes- 
ter. 

Dramatic Arts 331 , 332- Playwriting. 

The writing of long and short plays or television scripts. Consideration 
of character development, plot structure, dialogue, and critical analysis. 
Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. (Offered in alternate 
years; offered in 1970-71). 

Dramatic Arts 341— History of the Costume. 

History and design of stage costuming. Three periods a week for the 
first semester. Three credits. (Offered in alternate years; offered in 1970- 
71.) 

Dramatic Arts 361, 362-History of the Theatre. 

A study of theatre history from the classical Greek to the present, in- 
cluding the place of the theatre in the social, cultural, and philosophical 
framework of the period. Theatre design, conventions, the actor and audience 
related to the literature of the theatre. Three periods a week. Three credits 
each semester. 

Dramatic Arts 371- Oriental Theatre. 

A study of the dramatic literature, theatre and dance of the Orient. 
Analysis of the plays in the Classic Chinese, Indian, and Japanese theatres, 
within their artistic and historical settings. Analysis of the conventions and 
styles of the theatre and dance of the East. Three periods each week for the 
first semester. Three credits. (Offered in alternate years; not offered in 1970- 
71). 

Dramatic Arts 381- Art of Film. 

A survey of the major films from those of George Molies to the con- 
temporary cinema. Films are shown and discussed in class, readings in film 
theory and critical analysis are assigned. Three credits. 

Dramatic Arts 382— Film Production. 

The art of film is explored by active participation in it. Each student is 
expected to contribute to the creation of a film as a screenwriter, director, 
cinematographer, or editor. Three credits. 

Dramatic Arts 431, 432— Directing. 

History, technique, and practice of directing the long and short play. 
Problems of high school, college, and community theatre. Three periods a 
week. Three credits each semester. 

Dramatic Arts 441 — Dramatic Criticism. 

Analysis of dramatic criticism from Aristotle to the present. Application 
to representative plays. Three periods a week for the first semester. Three 
credits. (Offered in alternate years; not offered in 1970-71.) 

Dramatic Arts 443— Children's Theatre. 

Staging and production of plays for children. Dramatization of original 
and adapted literature. Creative dramatics. Three periods a week. Three 
credits. (Offered in alternate years; not offered in 1970-71.) 



Dramatic Arts 451, 452— Special Studies in Speech and Dramatic Arts. 

Open to all Dramatic Arts and Speech majors and otherwise qualified 
students of junior and senior status who desire special studies in the area of 
speech or dramatic arts. The emphasis will be upon either intensive reading 
in the field of speech or drama or creative application of advanced dramatic 
arts or speech theories. By permission of the department. 

Dramatic Arts 461 — Seminar in Dramatic Arts 

Selected readings, oral presentation, and discussion. Two one-and-one half 
periods a week. Three credits. 

Dramatic Arts 491, 492— Independent Study. 

Individual study under the direction of a member of the staff. Three to 
six credits. By permission of the Department. 



Speech 231, 232- Oral Interpretation. 

A study of the fundamentals of voice production and clarity of diction 
as an aid to effective communication. Interpretation of prose, poetry, and 
dramatic literature in terms of its intellectual, emotional, and aesthetic con- 
tent. Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. 

Speech 251, 252 +- Speech Fundamentals Laboratory. 

A functional course in reading and speaking, affording practice in basic 
speech skills. Emphasis is placed on individual speech problems and on the 
improvement of vocal delivery. Not credited toward a major in Dramatic 
Arts and Speech. No credit if Speech 231, 232 is taken for credit. One 
period a week. One credit each semester. 

Speech 301— Group Discussion. 

A study of the philosophy and practice of group discussion as a means of 
problem-solving and the exercise of group leadership. Three periods a week. 
Three credits each semester. (Offered in alternate years; not offered in 
1970-71.) 



119 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Dramatic Arts 

and 

Speech 



Speech 302— Public Speaking. 

A study of the art of public speaking, the organization and delivery of 
speeches of various types, and an examination of the history and theories 
of rhetoric. Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. (Offered in 
alternate years; not offered in 1970-71.) 

Speech 421— Voice Science. 

A study of the anatomical, physiological, and neurological functioning 
of the speech and hearing mechanisms and speech problems resulting from 
the impairment of these systems. Three periods a week. Three credits each 
semester. (Offered in alternate years; offered in 1970-71.) 



Speech 422— Phonetics. 

A study of American dialects and standards of speech employing the Inter- 
national Phonetic Alphabet. Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. 
(Offered in alternate years; offered in 1970-71.) 

See also Cooperative Program in Speech Pathology and Audiology, page 93. 



ECONOMICS AND POLITICAL SCIENCE/ Professor Lewis 
P. Fickett, Jr., Chairman; Professor Hewetson, R. E. Sumner; 
Associate Professor Miller; Assistant Professor Fingerhut, 
Instructors Albertine, Whisler; Visiting Lecturers Altensetter, 
Krickus, Williams. 

Economics 

A major program in Economics requires the completion of 
thirty-six credit hours. At least twenty-four of these hours must be 
in Economics courses other than Economics 201-202, Principles 
of Economics. (It will be noted that Economics 201-202 is a pre- 
requisite for most of the Economics courses.) Of the twenty-four 
hours, Economics 321, Money and Banking, Economics 371, 
Microeconomics, and either Economics 322, a continuation of 
Money and Banking, or Economics 372, Macroeconomics, are 
required. The remaining twelve hours may be selected from addi- 
tional courses in Economics or other social sciences as approved. 



120 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Economics 

and 
Political 
Science 



Economics 201, 202- Principles of Economics. 

A study of facts and fundamental principles relating to the production, 
exchange, distribution, and consumption of goods and services for the satis- 
faction of human wants, including some consideration of basic economic 
institutions and systems. Three periods a week. Six credits. 

Economics 211, 212— Industrial Organizations. 

The application of micro-economic analysis to the problems of business 
organizations. Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. 

Economics 221, 222— Introductory Accounting. 

A study of the fundamental accounting principles and practices involved 
in the recording and interpretation of accounting data. Three periods a week. 
Three credits each semester. 



Economics 321, 322— Money and Banking. 

Prerequisite: Economics 201-202. Theory of money and credit, banking 
organization and practices, foreign exchange, international movement of capi- 
tal, and the financial aspects of business cycles. Three periods a week. 
Three credits each semester. 



Economics 341, 342— Government Finance. 

Prerequisite: Economics 201-202. Expenditures and revenues of federal, 
state, and local governments, the problems of shifting and incidence of taxes; 
the public debt and fiscal administration. Three periods a week. Three 
credits each semester. 



Economics 351-352— Labor Economics. 

A study of manpower, the labor force, and the organized labor movement. 
Three credits each semester. 



Economics 361, 362— Quantitative Economics. 

An introduction to some of the mathematical and statistical concepts as 
are necessary in advanced economics and econometrics. Three credits each 
semester. 

Economics 371 — Microeconomics. 

Prerequisite: Economics 201-202. Analysis of the firm and the household 
and their interactions, involving cost, utility, price, wage, interest, rent, and 
profit theory. Three periods a week for first semester. Three credits. 

Economics 372— Macroeconomics. 

Prerequisite: Economics 201-202. National income accounts and aggregate 
economic analysis. Three periods a week for second semester. Three credits. 

Economics 391— Comparative Economic Systems. 

Prerequisite: Economics 201-202. The nature of capitalism, socialism, 
communism, and fascism and the state of economic society in the various 
areas of the world. Three periods a week for first semester. Three credits. 



Economics 392— Economic Development. 

Prerequisite: Economics 201-202. An examination of the problems of 
accelerating economic development in poor countries and maintaining develop- 
ment in rich countries. This study will progress from the viewpoints of theory, 
history and policy in attempting to explain the forces that give long period 
growing power to an economy. Three credits. 

Economics 401-402— International Economics. 

Prerequisite: Economics 201-202. World economic resources, international 
trade, and economic problems in international relationships. Three periods 
a week. Three credits each semester. 

Economics 441-442— History of Economic Thought. 

Prerequisite: Economics 201-202. Survey of ancient and medieval economic 
thought; the Physiocrats and the mercantilists; the classical and neo-classical 
economics; and trends in economic thought since the middle of the nineteenth 
century. Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. 

Economics 471-472— Seminar in Economics. 

Directed individual research on an approved problem in economics. Three 
credits. 



121 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Economics 

and 

Political 

Science 



Political Science 

For a major in Political Science the requirements are twenty- 
four credits in political science and twelve credits in related sub- 
jects, in addition to six hours in Political Science 201, 202. 
Themajor program must include Political Science 301, 302, 441, and 
442. The related subjects may be selected from additional courses 
in Political Science or other social sciences as approved. 



Political Science 201, 202— American Government. 

The principles of political science as applied to American national govern- 
ment, state governments, and local government. Six credits. 

Political Science 211— Congress and the Political Process. 

An analysis of the legislative process in the United States, focused on the 
contemporary role of Congress in its relation with the Presidency, the federal 
bureaucracy, and pressure groups. Three periods a week for the first semester. 
Three credits. 

Political Science 212- The American Presidency. 

An analysis of a fluid institution in a going political system. Stress will 
be placed on the evolution of the modern presidency and its relationship to 
democratic theory. Three periods a week for the second semester. Three 
credits. 

Political Science 301— Comparative Government I. 

A comparative analysis of the governments of the United Kingdom, France, 
and West Germany. First semester. Three credits. 



122 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Economics 

and 
Political 
Science 



Political Science 302- Comparative Government II. 

A comparative analysis of the governments of the Soviet Union and 
Eastern Europe. Second semester. Three credits. 

Political Science 304— Problems in Contemporary American Politics. 

An in-depth analysis of selected problems in contemporary American politics. 
The course will be conducted as a seminar with emphasis on independent 
student research. Permission of the instructor is required for admission. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. 

Political Science 311, 312- Public Administration. 

The administrative aspects of government, problems of organization, fiscal 
control, administrative control, and a study of employment relations with 
personnel administration. Three periods a week. Six credits. 



Political Science 321— Theory of International Politics. 
An analysis of contemporary theory in international politics, including an 
evaluation of the United Nations and other international organizations. First 
semester. Three credits. 

Political Science 322- Problems in International Politics. 

A continuation of 321, focusing on the major contemporary problems in 
international politics such as Vietnam, the Middle East, European integration, 
and the Cold War. Second semester. Three credits. 



Political Science 332— Metropolitan Problems. 

An analytical study of the problems of American cities and other local 
areas. Three credits. 



Political Science 334— Political Parties. 

The structure and functions of political parties; the conduct of elections; 
pressure groups. Three credits. 

Political Science 341, Ml— Government Finance. 

Same as Economics 341, 342— Government Finance. Expenditures and re- 
venues of federal, state, and local governments, the problems of taxes, the 
public debt and fiscal administration. Three periods a week. Six credits. 

Political Science 351, 352— Political Problems of Latin America. 

A comparative analysis of the problems of political development con- 
fronting the nations of Latin America. Appropriate consideration will be given 
to the closely related problems of general development. Three periods a week 
for both semesters. Three credits each semester. 



Political Science 353— Politics of Middle and Southern Africa. 

The development of nationalism, the drives for independence, and the 
problems and politics of nation-building of the newly-independent sub- 
Saharan states. The politics of the white-controlled areas of southern Africa. 
Regional groupings. Pan-Africanism and other international aspects of African 
politics. Three credits. 

Political Science 354— Politics of South and Southeast Asia. 
A study of the political development of India, Pakistan, Thailand, Laos, 
Cambodia and the Vietnams. Problems in the economic development of 
these nations will be analyzed as related. Three credits. 

Political Science 355— Politics of North Africa and the Middle East. 

A study of the political development of the nations of North Africa 
and the Middle East. Emphasis will be given to the development of new 
political institutions in these areas. Three credits. 

Political Science 356— American Foreign Policy. 

Problems facing the United States in its search for national security and 
international stability and progress; emphasis on our foreign policy since 
World War II. Three credits. 



123 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Economics 

and 

Political 

Science 



Political Science 361- Problems of Communism. 

A study of the origins, development and contemporary aspects of world 
Communism. The evolution of "communist" thought: Marx, Engels, Lenin, 
Stalin, Mao, and post-Stalin Communist writings. The history and develop- 
ment of Communism as a political movement. The Soviet and Chinese 
experiences. Communism in the non-Western world. The Sino-Soviet con- 
flict, Eastern Europe and other major features and issues of contemporary 
world communism. Three credits. 



Political Science 422— American Civil Liberties. 

An intensive analysis of civil liberties in the United States, based primarily 
upon decisions of the Supreme Court. Three credits. 



Political Science 441— History of Political Thought I 
An examination of the contributions to political thought of the great 
political theorists from Plato to Burke. Three credits. 

Political Science 442— History of Political Thought II 
A continuation of Political Science 441 dealing with Liberalism, Communism, 
Socialism, Fascism. Three credits. 

Political Science 443— Modern Political Analysis. 

A study of the theories and applications of modern political analysis. 
Emphasis will be placed upon the behavioral approach to politics. Three 
credits. 

Political Science 462— Geopolitics. 

An examination and evaluation of geographic factors affecting world 
power struggles and international relations. Three periods a week. Three 
credits. (Same as Geography 462.) 

Political Science 481— Independent Study in Political Science. 
Directed individual research on approved problems in political science. 
Three credits. 



124 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Economics 

and 
Political 
Science 



Political Science 491— Problems in Political Economy. 

Open to all political science majors and otherwise qualified students of 
junior and senior status who desire to become more familiar with the litera- 
ture of political science in a field selected by the instructor after consultation 
with the students. Approval of instructor is required. The emphasis is on 
intensive reading with group discussions of the selections read. Three periods 
a week. Three credits. 



Political Economy and Public Affairs 

A major program in Political Economy and Public Affairs re- 
quired the student to take Economics 201-202, Principles of 
Economics, and Political Science 201-202, American Government. 
In addition to the above courses, the student must take fifteen 
credit hours in Economics and fifteen credit hours in Political 
Science selected from courses offered by the Department. These 
courses are to be chosen so as to provide the student with a 
foundation in either domestic or international public affairs. 



Typewriting 

The courses do not carry college credit and are designed pri- 
marily to develop skill in typewriting for personal use. Proper 
techniques of typewriting and a mastery of the keyboard are 
developed. To facilitate registration, the following course numbers 
have been assigned: 



Typewriting 121-122— 

Three periods a week. No credit. 



EDUCATION/Associate Professor Paul Slayton, Chairman; 
Professor Alvey; Associate Professor Merchent; Assistant Pro- 
fessors Holmes, Hook, Shaughnessy. 

As a liberal arts institution, Mary Washington College is 
committed to the preparation of elementary and secondary teachers 
of the liberal disciplines. The courses necessary for obtaining 
certification as a teacher in either elementary or secondary schools 
are available as electives to students at Mary Washington College. 
These courses are designed primarily to meet certification require- 
ments for teaching in Virginia. 

To fulfill the graduation requirements of the college and the 
certification requirements for the state, the faculty adviser and the 
student should plan the four-year academic program with care. 
Where it is possible, college and certification requirements should 
be overlapped to avoid amassing a surplus of credit hours. 

Certification Requirements For Grades One Through Seven. 

To be certified the student must complete the degree require- 
ments and may select any major program offered by the college. 

To meet the minimum requirements to teach in the elementary 
schools, students must complete courses in two areas: general 
education, and professional education: 



125 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Education 



General Education 

A minimum of sixty semester hours of course work distributed 
so that the following specific requirements are met: 

1. Humanities Semester hours 
English (including courses in composition and 

children' s literature 18 

Foreign Language 6 

2. Social Science 

American History 3 

Economics 3 

Electives (from history, economics, general 
psychology, political science and sociology. 
Geography and world history are recommended) 12 

3. Natural Science 8 

4. Mathematics 6 

5. Art and Music 6 

6. Physical Education or its equivalent and Health 4 



126 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Education 



Professional Education 

1. Psychology 

Psy 331, Developmental Psychology: Child 

Development 3 

Psy 332, Developmental Psychology: Adolescent 
Development 3 

2. Education 312, Teaching in the Elementary School 

(to be taken during either semester of junior 

year 3 

3. Education 320, The Teaching of Reading 3 

4. Education 440, Student Teaching (See supervised 

Teaching, pp 131 6 

For students who prefer a more highly specialized preparation 
for elementary school teaching leading to the degree of Bachelor 
of Science in Education, a special program in cooperation with 
the School of Education at the University of Virginia is offered. 
(See Cooperative Program in Elementary Education, page 92.) 

Certification Requirements For Secondary School Subjects. 

To meet requirements to teach a subject in the secondary 
school, students must complete credits in general education, in 
professional education, and in the subject to be taught. Moreover, 
it is recommended that all students preparing to teach take a 
course in speech and basic economics to satisfy in part the general 
education requirements. 

General Education Semester hours 

1 . Humanities 12 

English Composition 3 

Electives (from foreign language, literature, 
speech, fine arts, music and philosophy) 9 

2 . Social Science 12 

American History 3 

Electives (from history, sociology, economics, 
political science, geography, and general 
psychology— recommended: general 

psychology) 9 

3. Laboratory Science and Mathematics 12 

(at least one course in each area) 

4. Health and Physical Education 4 



2. 



3. 



Professional Education 

1. Psychology (in addition to general psychology) 3 

Psy 332, Developmental Psychology: Adolescent 
Development is strongly recommended. 
300 level education course appropriate to subject area. 3 

(to be taken during either semester of junior year) 
Education 420, Foundations of Education (to be taken 
concurrently with Education 440, Student teaching. 3 

4. Education 440, Supervised Teaching 6 

(see Supervised Teaching, Page 131.) 
Areas of Specialization 

The minimum hours required in the subject taught on the 
secondary level are itemized below and may include any hours 
that have been included in the general education requirements. 
However, a student should major in the subject she wishes to 
teach so that an adequate depth and background are assured. 
Student teaching in the secondary school will be permitted only 
in the student's major subject. 



127 




COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Education 






128 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Education 



Art 30 

Distribution in art courses as follows: 

a. Design, drawing, painting, graphics 12 

b. Sculpture 6 

c. Ceramics and crafts 6 

d . History and Appreciation of Art 6 

English 30 

Shall include courses in English literature, American 
literature, language and composition. Should include also 
a course in advanced composition writing and a course in 
modern English Grammar. 
(NOTE: The English major may be certified to teach 
speech and/ or dramatics with six hours credit in either 
of those disciplines.) 

Semester hours 

Dramatics 12 

Speech 12 

Foreign Language 30 

Shall include thirty semester hours of language and litera- 
ture including the beginning, intermediate, and other 
courses which may have been taken prior to college study. 
(Note: For endorsement in a second foreign language the 
student must present twenty-four hours of credit in that 
language.) 

Latin 24 

(NOTE: For endorsement in Latin as a second language 
or in addition to English the applicant must present eight- 
teen semester hours of Latin language and literature, 
including the beginning, intermediate, and other courses 
which may have been taken prior to college study.) 
Mathematics 

a. All High School Mathematics 27 

(NOTE: Shall include a course in analytic geometry and 
calculus and should include courses in modern algebra, 
geometry, probability, and/or statistics.) 

b. Teachers of Mathematics (Pre- Algebra) 16 

(eighth and ninth grade arithmetic, consumer mathematics, 
basic mathematics, and business mathematics) 

Music 36 

a. Performance 18 

b. Basic Musical Knowledge 18 



History and the Social Sciences 42 

The credit shall be distributed as follows: 

a. History 18 

b. Government 12 

c. Economics 6 

d. Geography 6 

To teach a specific social science subject, the student must 
complete the following minimums: 

a. History (selected from not less than two of the 
following: American history, ancient history, and 
contemporary affairs) 24 

b. Economics 18 

c. Geography 18 

d . Political Science 18 

e. Sociology 18 

NOTE: An applicant for a separate endorsement in history, 
geography, government and sociology must complete a course in 
basic economics. 



Science 

a. Biology 24 

Shall include a laboratory course in introductory biology. 
In addition a year's course in organic chemistry, physics, 
and mathematics should be completed. 

b. Chemistry 24 

Shall include courses in general principles and organic, 
analytical, and physical chemistry. In addition a year's 
course in biology, physics and mathematics should be 
completed. 

c. Earth Science 24 

Shall include a year's course in general college geology 
and a semester's course in each of two of the following: 
astronomy, meteorology, oceanography and physical 
geography. 

d. General Science 24 

The student must present credit in at least three science 
fields: biology, chemistry, physics or earth science. 

e. Physics 20 

Physics, alternate endorsement 16 

(All persons with a college major in astronomy or with 
endorsement in biology, chemistry, or mathematics 
(all high school subjects) shall be endorsed in physics with 
sixteen semester hours in physics, eight semester hours 
of which must be in courses above the introductory 
level which use calculus.) 



129 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Education 



Qualified applicants may wish to enter the Internship Program 
for Prospective Teachers leading to the Master of Arts in Teaching 
degree offered by the University of Virginia. (See description of 
the program on page 95). 

Education 312- Teaching in the Elementary School. 

The purposes and organization of the elementary school and its cur- 
riculum; subject content and instructional methods related to child growth 
and development with emphasis on the teaching of subject disciplines, 
classroom management and evaluation of pupil progress. 

Education 320— Teaching Reading in the Elementary School. 

A specialized course in the principles and techniques for teaching reading. 
Major emphasis will be upon the patterns of language development, the 
structure of the language, the relationship of oral to written communication, 
and the tools available to the teacher in furthering the general language 
development of youth. 



130 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Education 



Education 332— The Teaching of Foreign Languages. 

The principles and techniques of teaching modern and classical languages 
in the secondary school. Some important areas developed are: selecting 
materials of instruction in foreign languages, planning and guiding learning 
experiences, and appraising the results of the teaching-learning process. 

Education 342— Seminar in Art Education. 

Designed for students who expect to teach art, but open to other art 
majors. Study of the scope and place of the visual arts in the world today; 
of adult and child attitudes and aptitudes; the development of a philosophy 
toward creative work, some practice in organizing a flexible and workable 
program for future teaching or study. 



Education 352— The Teaching of Mathematics. 

Consideration of principles and techniques of teaching and materials of 
instruction for teaching mathematics in the secondary school. Some important 
areas developed are: planning and guiding learning experience in mathematics 
and appraising the results of the teaching-learning process. 

Education 362— The Teaching of Music. 

(See Music 311-312 in the listing of courses of the Music Department.) 
Completion of this course suffices to fill the teaching of subject require- 
ment for certification purposes. 



Education 372— The Teaching of the Social Sciences. 

The purposes and organization of the secondary social science curriculum; 
subject matter content and instructional methods in the various social sciences. 
Some important areas developed are: planning and guiding learning ex- 
periences in social science and appraising the results of the teaching-learning 
process. 



Education 382- The Teaching of the Sciences. 

The purposes and organization of the secondary science curriculum; sub- 
ject matter content and instructional methods in the various sciences. Some 
important areas developed are: planning and guiding learning experiences 
in science and appraising the results of the teaching-learning process. 

Education 392— The Teaching of English, Speech & Dramatics. 

The purposes and organization of the secondary language arts curricula; 
subject matter content and instructional methods related to the development 
of language skills and tastes during the adolescent years. Consideration of 
principles, techniques, and materials of instruction for teaching English, 
Speech, and Dramatics in the secondary school. 

Education 420- Foundations of Education. 

(To be taken concurrently with Education 440.) An analysis of the role 
of education in the United States. Major emphasis in this course are the 
surveys of the contributions of the foundation disciplines to theory and 
practice in American schools: history of education, cultural anthropology, 
sociology, philosophy, psychology of learning, political science and economics. 



Education 440— Supervised Teaching. 

Prerequisite: appropriate three-hundred level course in education. Orienta- 
tion to teaching under direction of supervisors in public elementary and 
secondary schools in three different geographic localities: the Richmond 
area, the Fredericksburg area, and the Northern Virginia area. Includes 
practical experience in the classroom, laboratory, and field activities, as 
well as other aspects of the total school program. Other regulations governing 
acceptance into supervised teaching are found below. Offered each semester. 
Six credits. 



131 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Education 



Supervised Teaching 

Facilities for student teaching in both elementary and secondary 
schools are available in three localities: the Richmond area, the 
Fredericksburg area, and the Northern Virginia area. Under the 
cooperative arrangements in effect, students in their senior year 
are assigned to specific classes for observation, participation, and 
teaching responsibilities under the guidance and supervision of 
experienced teachers. Supervised teaching is available in the high 
school academic subjects and in the elementary grades, as well as 
in art and music. 

Students seeking certification should reserve one semester of 
the senior year primarily for student teaching. During that semester 
the student should enroll for Education 440, Student Teaching. 
A total of twelve hours will be considered a normal load of 
courses during the student teaching semester; therefore, only one 
other course may be taken during the period the student is 
enrolled in Education 440. (For student teachers choosing assign- 



ment in the Richmond and Northern Virginia areas, the Education 
420 course will be taught in those areas by members of the Mary 
Washington College Department of Education. Arrangements for 
the additional course may be made through colleges in those 
areas.) 

For assignment to supervised teaching, students must meet the 
eligibility requirements, which include (a) senior status; (b) an 
average of at least "C" in general and in the major field; and 
(c) aptitude for the profession. Secondary school teachers must 
major in the subject they plan to teach as well as meet the above 
requirements. Enrollment is by permission of the Department of 
Education and is contingent on the availability of space in the 
cooperating school divisions. Transportation to and from the 
cooperating school is the responsibility of the student. Students 
applying for positions in supervised teaching should submit the 
appropriate application forms to the Department of Education by 
May 1 of their junior year at Mary Washington College for 
assignments the following session. 



132 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

English 



ENGLISH/ Professor Sidney H. Mitchell, Chairman; Professors 
Croushore, B. W. Early, Griffith, W. B. Kelly, Simpson, 
Whidden,D. H. Woodward; Associate Professors Brown, Finne- 
gan, Fleming, Glover, N. H. Mitchell; Assistant Professors 
Dervin, Hanner, Singh; Instructors M. S. Early, Fellowes, 
Hansen*, Lutterbie, Rankin, Ross, Winston. 

English 1 1 1 is prerequisite to all other English courses. 

Students choosing to major in English must take at least twenty- 
four credits in English courses numbered 300 or higher and twelve 
credits in related fields, in addition to the twelve hours of English 
listed in the degree requirements. The twenty-four hours in ad- 
vanced English courses must include six hours in courses numbered 
300 to 326; six hours in courses numbered 335 to 376; six hours 
in 400 courses. 

In their senior year majors are required to pass a written 
examination in English and American literature in order to complete 
their major program. This comprehensive examination is designed 
to encourage majors to assimilate material from classes, independent 
study, and personal reading and to offer them an opportunity 
to display a comprehensive knowledge of literary trends and 
theories. A copy of sample questions is in the Reserve Room in 
the Library, and departmental advisers can provide additional 
information on request. 



*On leave 1969-70. 



A distinguished performance on the comprehensive examination, 
in addition to a high level of achievement in the major program, 
will entitle majors to be graduated with "Honors in English." 

It is recommended that English majors who plan to do graduate 
work take two foreign languages, preferably French and German. 

The twelve credits of related study are to be selected, with the 
approval of the student's adviser, from among the courses numbered 
200 or higher in the following departments; six credits must be 
offered from a single department; the remaining six must be 
offered from one or more other departments: 

Art (courses in Art History) 

Classics 

Dramatic Arts (courses in dramatic literature) 

History 

Languages 

Music (courses in the history and literature of music) 

Philosophy 

Religion (including Religion 101, 102) 



English 111— Composition and Reading. 

The mechanics of writing and an introduction to literature. To earn credit 
for the course, the student must have a passing average in her theme pro- 
gram. Three credits. 

English 205— Children's Literature. 

A study of the various sections of children's literature— fables; myths; 
folk and hero stories; poetry. Open to juniors and seniors only. For elective 
credit only. Three credits each semester. 



133 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

English 



English 231— Short Fiction. 
A study of selected short stories and short novels. Three credits. 

English 232- The Novel. 

A study of the form, content, and development of selected novels. Three 
credits. 

English 233— Poetry. 
A close analysis of poetic form and content. Three credits. 

English 234— Shakespeare. 

A study of Shakespeare's achievement in selected plays and poems. Three 
credits. (No additional credit will be allowed for English 425, 426.) 



English 235— Tragedy. 

Tragedy as form and idea reflected in selected literary and dramatic works 
of world literature. Three credits. 



English 236— Comedy. 

A study of comic conventions in selected works of world literature. Three 
credits. 



English 305— The English Language. 

Structural and transformational grammars and their application to the 
English language. Three credits for the first semester. 

English 308- Old and Middle English Literature in Translation. 

A study of some of the major works and genres of Anglo-Saxon and 
Middle English literature, including lyric, heroic and romance narratives 
and drama. Knowledge of the languages is not required. Three credits tor 
the second semester. 

English 315, 316 +- The English Renaissance. 

The non-dramatic poetry and prose of the Elizabethan, Jacobean, and 
Caroline periods. Three credits each semester. 



134 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

English 



English 325, 326+- Eighteenth Century Literature, 1660-1800. 
A study of the main types of literature in England from the Restoration 
through the eighteenth century, with particular attention to the development 
of neoclassical values and their decline and the rise of romanticism. Three 
credits each semester. 



English 335, 336+— Nineteenth Century English Literature. 
First semester, Romantic poetry and prose; second semester, Victorian 
poetry and prose. Three credits each semester. 



English 355, 356+— Nineteenth Century American Literature. 

First semester, literary romanticism in American prose and poetry; second 
semester, literary realism in American prose and poetry. Three credits each 
semester. 



English 365, 366+- Modern Literature. 

A comparative study of important European, British, and American authors 
from 1885 to the present. Three credits each semester. 

English 375, 376+- Special Studies. 

Studies in significant literary figures, movements, topics. 

1970-1971 (1st semester) Afro- American Literature. 

1970-1971 (2nd semester) Psychological Dimensions of Literature 

1971-1972 (1st semester) Afro-American Literature. 

1971-1972 (2nd semester) Psychological Dimensions of Literature. 

Three credits each semester. 



English 406— Workshop in Writing. 
Practice in creative expression. Admission 
Three credits for the first semester. 



by consent of the instructor. 




English 409— Literary Criticism. 

A study of literary criticism from Plato to the present with emphasis on 
forms other than drama. Readings and class discussions will focus on both 
historical developments in literary theory and examples of critical practice. 
Three credits for the first semester. 

English 415, 416+- The Novel. 

Development of the novel in England and America. Three credits 
each semester. 

English 417, 418 f— English Drama. 

The origin and development of drama from the Middle Ages. First 
semester, Middle Ages to the Restoration; second semester, the Restoration 
to the present. Three credits each semester. 



English 422— Chaucer. 
Chaucer's literary backgrounds and his major works. Three credits. 

English 425, 426+— Shakespeare. 

Shakespeare's development as a dramatist. Three credits each semester. 

English 436— Seventeenth Century Studies. 

Intensive study of significant figures, movements, or problems in the litera- 
ture of the seventeenth century. Three credits for the second semester. 



135 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

English 



English 445— Eighteenth Century Studies. 

Intensive study of significant figures, movements, or problems in the litera- 
ture of the eighteenth century. Three credits for the first semester. 

English 455— Nineteenth Century English Studies. 

Intensive study of significant figures, movements, or problems in nineteenth 
century English literature. Three credits for the first semester. 

English 466— Twentieth Century English Studies. 

An intensive study of a few modern writers. Three credits for the second 
semester. 



English 475— Nineteenth Century American Studies. 

Intensive investigation of significant literary figures, movements, or pro- 
blems in nineteenth century American literature. Three credits for the first 
semester. 



English 486— Twentieth Century American Studies. 
Intensive investigation of significant literary figures, movements, or problems 
in twentieth century American literature. Three credits for the second semeste.. 

English 490, 491, 492, 493- Independent Study. 

Individual study under the direction of a member of the staff. From three 
to twelve hours, not more than six to be taken in the junior year. Three to 
twelve credits. (By permission of the department.) 



136 
COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Geography 

and 

Geology 



GEOGRAPHY AND GEOLOGY/ Professor Samuel T. Emory, 
Chairman; Professor Bird; Associate Professor Bowen; Assistant 
Professor Gouge r. 

Geography 

A student wishing to major in geography and geology must 
take a total of thirty-six semester hours in addition to Geology 
121-122. Twenty-four hours of this are to be taken in geography 
and geology while the remaining twelve hours are to be taken in 
related fields approved by the department. The total program must 
form a coherent group of courses and must be planned in con- 
sultation with the department. 

Courses counted toward filling any of the basic or area re- 
quirements for a degree cannot be counted also a part of the 
major program requirements. 
Geography 212— World Geography. 

An introduction to cultural geography with an emphasis upon the develop- 
ment and spatial arrangement of the major societies of the modern world. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. 
Geography 275— Human Environment: Perception and Utilization. 
A study of human ecology stressing the quality of the environment. 
Emphasis on pollution, resource utilization and conservation, and Man's 
role in changing the face of the earth. Three credits. 

Geography 313— Weather and Climate. 

An analysis of weather processes, distribution of climatic regions, the rela- 
tionship between climate, vegetation, and soil regions, and the impact of 
climate upon man's activities. Three periods a week. Three credits. 

Geography320— Geography of Anglo- America. 

A survey of the United States and Canada by regions. (New England, 
the South, French Canada, etc.) including the culture, population, industry, 
trade, and natural foundation of each. Three periods a week. Three credits. 

Geography 325— Geography of Europe. 

A survey of the European continent including the climate, surface features, 
natural resources, population, agriculture, industry, and trade of each 
European nation and the nation's position in the world today. Three periods 
a week. Three credits. 



Geography 331 — Geography of Asia. 

A study of the landforms, climate, boundaries, trade, resources, people, 
and cultural groupings of the continent of Asia. Three periods a week. 
Three credits. 

Geography 333— Geography of Africa. 

A study of the landforms, climate, peoples, boundaries, trade, and cultural 
groupings of the African continent. Three periods a week. Three credits. 

Geography 334— Geography of South America. 

A survey of the population, natural resources, geographic regions, and 
potentialities of South America; the significance of this region in the economic 
and political affairs of the world. Three periods a week. Three credits. 

Geography 335 -Geography of Middle America and the Carribean. 

A survey of the population, natural resources, geographic regions, and 
potentialities of Middle America and the Carribean; and the significance 
of this region in the economic and political affairs of the world. Three 
periods a week. Three credits. 

Geography 340— Economic Geography. 

A comparative geographical survey of major economic activities such as 
agriculture, forestry, fishing, mining, manufacturing, and commerce. Emphasis 
upon study of the characteristics of distribution and the regional patterns of 
these activities. Three periods a week. Three credits. 

Geography 415- Cartography. 

Analysis of cartographic problems with exercises in techniques of presenta- 
tion; a survey of the history of cartography, map projections and symbols, 
and methods of graphic representation. Two single and two double periods a 

tweek. Four credits. 

Geography 422— Historical Geography of North America. 

A study of the geography of selected regions of North America during 
designated periods of history. Emphasis will be placed upon settlement 
geography, historical economic geography, and geographical change through 
time. Three periods a week. Three credits. 

Geography 461 — Geographical Influences on History. 
A study ol the influence of man's physical environment on history, with 
emphasis on American history. Three periods a week. Three credits. 

Geography 462- Political Geography. 

A study of geographic factors in world power and international affairs. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. 



137 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Geography 

and 

Geology 



Geography 480— History of Geographic Thought. 

A survey of the development of geographic knowledge and thought as 
illustrated by the writings of representative geographers and other scientists 
in related fields, both past and contemporary. Three periods a week. Three 
credits. 



Geography 490— Special Problems in Geography. 

An independent study of some geographic problem selected in consultation 
with the department. May be repeated for credit. Three credits. 



138 

COURSE 

OFFERINGS 

Health, 
P.E., and 
Recreation 



Geology 

Students emphasizing geology may elect to receive a B. S. 
degree by selecting the correct area requirements and related 
field in consultation with the department. 

Geology 121- 122— Introduction to Earth Science. 

The changing earth, the processes that produce change, the history of 
change and how earth history is read. Three single and one double period a 
week. Four credits each semester. 

Geology 312— Geomorphology. 

The origin and development of landforms and their relation to underlying 
structure. Three credits. 

Geology 331— Invertebrate Paleontology. 

Hard and soft part morphology and evolution of major invertebrate 
groups. Three single and one double period a week. Four credits. 

Geology 332— Mineralogy-Petrology . 

Basic concepts of the solid state of matter; crystal lattices and crystals, 
identification and classification of rocks and minerals; origin and evolution 
of igneous rocks; materials, structure and energy of earth's interior. Three 
single and one double period a week. Four credits. 

Geology 351 — Readings in Geology. 

Readings from texts, references, and journals in one of the following: 
Geochemistry; geophysics; sedimentation; vertebrate palentology; andpaleoco- 
logy. Three periods a week. Three credits. 

Geology 490— Independent Study in Geology. 

Prerequisite: four semesters of geology. Investigation of a geologic problem 
to be chosen in consultation with instructor. Three credits. 



HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, AND RECREATION/ 

Associate Professor Margery E. Arnold, Chairman; Professors 
Benton, Read; Associate Professors Droste, Greenberg, 
Woosley; Assistant Professors Clement, Darby; Instructors 
Dosch, Hyde, Dragomanovic, Gardner, Hollack, and Kir- 

SCHNER. 

A program leading to the B. A. degree with the major in dance is 
described on page 141. 



The following departmental requirements and information should 
be noted. 

1. Four credits in physical education are required for a degree. 
College credit in physical education is limited to four hours. (A 
student may take courses in dance in excess of the four credits 
allowed in physical education with the written approval of the 
departmental chairman or advisor in the student's major field.) 

2. Students are expected to complete the four credits during 
their first two college years. 

3. A student may elect two credits in Health Education. 

4. Each student is expected to participate in physical educa- 
tion activities. If a student's health restricts her participation, 
she is expected to take some modified activity. Such students shall 
arrange their physical education work in consultation with the 
chairman of the department. 

5. A student may take any course which the department offers 
on the level for which she is qualified. 

6. A student may not enroll in more than one course in 
physical education during a semester without the approval of the 
department chairman. 

7. Each student should have a pair of tennis shoes; dark, 
solid color, cotton Bermuda shorts; white tailored blouse; and 
leotards. She should also bring a tennis racket and golf clubs if 
she plans to participate in these activities. 

8. Satisfactory/ Unsatisfactory. Grades in the Physical Educa- 
tion Department (with the exception of the Dance Major courses) 
are S and U. "U" means that the requirement has not been 
met, and an additional course must be taken. Credits earned with 
an "S" count towards graduation but carry no quality points. 



139 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Health, 
P. E. , and 
Recreation 



Health Education 

Health Education 100— Contemporary Health Problems. 
Two periods a week for one semester. Two credits. 

Physical Education 

All classes meet three periods per week or the equivalent. 
All carry one credit. 

Physical Education 101, 102; 201, 202; 301, 302; 401, Ml* -Field. Hockey. 
Physical Education 103, 104; 203, 204; 303, 304; 403, 404- Basketball. 
*100 numbers indicate first level; 200 numbers indicate second level, etc. 



140 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Health, 
P.E., and 
Recreation 



Physical Education 105, 106; 205, 206; 305, 306; 405, 406- Volley ball. 

Physical Education 109, 110; 209, 210; 309, 310; 409, 410-Lacrosse. 

Physical Education 111, 112; 211, 212; 311, 312; 411, All- Gymnastics. 

Physical Education 113, 114; 213, 214; 313, 314; 413, 414- Individual. 
Exercise. 

Physical Education 115, 116; 215, 216; 315, 316; 415, 416— Swimming. 

Physical Education 117, 118; 217, 218; 317, 318; 417, 4lS-Correctives. 

Physical Education 119— Fundamentals of Movement. 

Physical Education 120— Introduction to Dance. 

Physical Education 121, 122; 221, 222; 321, 322; 421, Mi-Ballet . 

Physical Education 123, 124; 223, 224; 323, 324; 423, 414-Modern Dance. 

Physical Education 125, 126; 225, 226; 325, 326; 425, 416-Tap Dance. 

Physical Education 127, 128; 227, 228; 327, 328; 427, 41%-Folkand 
National Dance. 

Physical Education 129, 130; 229, 230; 329, 330; 429, 430- American 
Folk and Square Dance. 

Physical Education 131, 132— Officiating. 

Physical Education 133, 134; 233, 234; 333, 334; 433, 434- Tennis. 
Physical Education 135, 136; 235, 236; 335, 336; 435, 436- Golf. 
Physical Education 139, 140; 239, 240; 339, 340; 439, 440-Archery. 
Physical Education 141, 142; 241, 242; 341, 342; 441, 441-Fencing. 
Physical Education 145, 146; 245, 246; 345, 346; 445,446- Badminton. 
*Physical Education 147, 148; 247, 248; 347, 348; 447, 44S-Riding. 

*Written permission of parent or guardian must be presented 
before enrollment in this course may be completed. Each student 
will have an opportunity to ride in the annual Horse Show. 

Riding for recreation, without credit, two hours a week each 
semester. Fee, $90.00. 



Dance 

The major program in dance requires a minimum of twenty- 
four credits selected from courses in dance and twelve credits in 
the related fields of art, drama, and music. The student will 
select one of these areas to satisfy the fine arts requirement. 
A major student must acquire the ability to perform well in dance. 
The four-year program should be planned in consultation with the 
adviser. 
The twenty-four credits within the major are as follows: 

Studio Dance 6 

Dance 211-212 Analysis of Movement Theories 6 

Dance 232 Survey of Dance Styles 2 

Dance 35 1 , 352 History of Dance 6 

Dance 431-432 Problems in Choreography 4 

The twelve credits in related fields may be selected from the 
following: 

Art 6 

Any advanced course in Art History 

Dramatic Arts and Speech 6 

Dramatic Arts 321 , 322 Acting 
Dramatic Arts 361 , 362 History of Theatre 
Dramatic Arts 411 , 412 Stagecraft and Design 
Dramatic Arts 431 , 432 Directing 

Music 6 

Music 285, 286 Instrumental Sight 

Reading (no credit) 
Music 305, 306 History of Music 
Music 315 Twentieth Century Music 
The twenty-eight credits of electives should be selected in con- 
sultation with the adviser. Electives include additional dance courses 
and courses of the student's choice. 



141 
COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Health, 
P.E., and 
Recreation 



*Dance 121, 122; 221, 222; 321, 322; 421, 422- Ballet. 

The study of ballet as a discipline toward exactness and precision of line, 
as a creative means of expression, and from an historical reference. Three 
periods a week. One credit each semester. 



*Dance 123, 124; 223, 224; 323, 324; 423, 424- Modern Dance. 

The study of body movement, its relationship to space, time, and force 
through improvisation and exploration. Three periods a week. One credit 
each semester. 



Dance 211-212— Analysis of Movement Theories. 

The comparison of selected theories of movement, including Dalcroze 
(rhythm); Delsarte (gesture); Humphrey- Weidman (gravity); Laban (effort- 
shape); Metheny-Ellfeldt (kinesthesis); Wigman (space); and the contemporary 
concept of total body movement (applied anatomy). Three periods a week. 
Six credits. 

*Dance 231 — Studies in Compositional Forms. 

The study of forms in dance as the structure and organization of movement 
patterns and phrases. Experimental studies. Two double periods a week. 
One credit. 

Dance 232— Survey of Dance Styles. 

The study of dance style related to historical periods in art, drama, and 
music. Creative work in primitive, archaic, medieval, pre-classic, classic, 
and contemporary styles. Three double periods a week. Two credits. 

Dance 235- 236— Dance Movement for the Theatre. 

Prerequisite: two credits of modern dance or proficiency. A study of move- 
ment as an instrument of communication in dramatic production through 
creative projects in the theatre involving the interrelation of movement with 
mime, gesture, space, rhythm, and expression. Two double periods a week. 
Two credits. 



142 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Health, 
P.E., and 
Recreation 



Dance 310- Creative Dance for Children. 

Dramatic imagery, rhythmic improvisation, and the translation from ob- 
servation of movement through pantomine to dance. Two double periods a 
week. Two credits. 

*Dance 331-Ethnic Dance of Western Cultures. 

The study of the authentic and traditional dance forms and styles of the 
people of Western Cultures through knowledge and understanding of their 
history, culture and civilization. Performance of selected dances. Three 
periods a week. Two credits. 



Dance 332— Ethnic Dance of Eastern Cultures. 

The study of the dance forms and styles of the people of Eastern Cultures 
through knowledge and understanding of their history, culture and civilization. 
Three periods a week. Two credits. 

Dance 341/342— Labanotation. 

The study and practice of reading and writing a scientifically constructed 
method of recording movement by means of symbols, leading to certificate 
examination on the beginning and intermediate levels. Two double periods 
a week. Three credits each semester. 



'Studio Dance 



Dance 351, 352— History of Dance. 

The study of the evolution of dance from its beginnings to the present time, 
as it reflects the culture and history of the period. Three periods a week. 
Three credits each semester. 

Dance 431- 432- Problems in Choreography. 

Prerequisite: Dance 231, 232 or permission of the instructor. Opportunities 
for reading and research related to the portrayal of an idea, mood, char- 
acterization, or an emotion through dance in a theatrical setting as a non- 
verbal form of the communicative arts. Three double periods a week. Four 
credits. 

Dance 440— Independent Study. 

Prerequisite: permission of the instructor. Research, reading, writing, 
choreographing or composing an approved creative problem in dance. Develop- 
ment of a paper, project, performance or production. Three credits. 



*Studio Dance. 




143 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Health, 
P. E. , and 
Recreation 



144 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

History 



HISTORY/ Professor Joseph C. Vance, Chairman; Professor 
Lindsey; Associate Professors M. Houston, Zimdars; Assistant 
Professors Bourdon, Klenke, Ryang, Saunders, Sherwood, 
Tracy, Warner; Instructor Campbell. 

Students who choose a major in history must earn thirty credits 
in history in addition to the College degree requirement. Twenty- 
one credits must be devoted to courses above the 200 level, 
which must include at least one semester course on the 400 
level in addition to History 490, Independent Historical Research. 
A student's program must be planned in consultation with the 
departmental advisor and approved by him. 

Majors interested in Honors work should consult the current 
catalogue and the chairman of the department. 

The College degree requirement of six hours in history can be 
fulfilled by completing: 

History 201-202— American History 

History 211-212— History of Western Civilization or by completing 
six hours of any combination of two courses from those numbered 
221 through 224, or 231 through 236. 

Students who plan to teach in Virginia should note that a 
course in American history is required for certification. This can 
be satisfied together with the College degree requirement by 
taking courses from those numbered 201, 202 or 221 through 224. 



History 201, 202— American History. 

A survey of the history of the United States from the Colonial period to 
the present. Three credits each semester. 

History 211, 212— History of Western Civilization. 
An introductory survey of the origin and development of civilization- 
ancient, medieval, and modern. Three credits each semester. 

History 221 — Colonial America. 

The discovery, exploration, and settlement of North America and the 
development of the British Colonies to 1763. Three credits. 

History 222— The American Revolution and the Early National Period. 
Independence, the creation of the United States and its development 
through the Jackson period. Three credits. 



History 223— Civil War, Reconstruction, and The Gilded Age. 
The coming of the War, the War, restoration of the Union and the 
problems of reconstruction, the emergence of industrial America. Three credits. 



History 224— Twentieth Century America. 

Economic, social, and political development and the rise of the United States 
as a world power. Three credits. 

History 231 — Greek Civilization. 

A study of the geography, history and civilization of Greece from earliest 
times through the death of Alexander the Great. Three credits. 

History 232— Roman Civilization. 

A study of the geography, history and civilization of Italy and the Roman 
state from earliest times through the age of Justinian. Three credits. 

History 233— Medieval Europe. 

Europe from 325 to 1400. Emphasis on the decline of the Roman Empire, 
migrations, the church, feudal institutions, medieval thought and the origins 
of modern national institutions. Three credits. 

History 234— The Renaissance and Reformation. 

The period examined as one of transition, from the High Middle Ages to 
1618. Three credits. 



History 235- Early Modern Europe, 1618-1815. 

A study of Europe during the Age of Absolutism, the Enlightenment, 
the French Revolution and the Napoleonic Era. Three credits. 

History 236— Modern Europe, 1815 to the present. 

A survey of the period with emphasis on the Industrial Revolution, 
nationalism, democracy, imperialism, power politics and social reform. Three 
credits. 



145 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

History 



History 301, 303— Diplomatic History of the United States. 
A study of foreign relations from the Colonial period to the present. 
Three credits each semester. 

History 303, 304-The Old and New South. 

First semester, an examination of the social, political, and economic 
development of the South before the Civil War. Second semester, Recon- 
struction, race relations, the "solid South" in politics, and the rise of 
Southern industry. Three credits each semester. 

History 305— The Frontier in American History. 

The westward movement and the significance of the Frontier, emphasizing 
the Turnerian thesis. Three credits. 



History 306— The Negro in American History. 

A history of the Negro since the early 1600's with emphasis on his role 
during the Ante-Bellum period, Emancipation and Reconstruction, the 
nadir of the Negro in America (1878-1900), the Negro in the twentieth 
century with stress on the period since 1928. Three credits. 



History 307, 30$-<Social and Intellectual History of the United States. 

The main traditions of thought and belief through the writings of significant 
figures in relation to the social environment and the major historical events 
and cultural changes. Three credits each semester. 

History 321, 322— Latin American History. 

Colonial institutions, the independence movement, development of the 
modern states, Organization of American States, and other international 
problems. Three credits each semester. 

History 323, 324— Social and Intellectual History of Latin America. 
An intensive study of institutions and though from preconquest Indian 
cultures to the present. Three credits each semester. 

History 341, 342— East Asian Civilization. 

A survey of the development of culture and civilizations in China and 
Japan. Three credits each semester. 

History 343— Modern China and Japan. 

A history of modern China and Japan with a special emphasis on their 
rise to positions of world power. Three credits. 



146 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

History 



History 344— Modern Southeast Asia. 
A history of modern Southeast Asia. Three credits. 

History 351 ,352- History of England. 

A general survey of English history from earliest records to the present. 
Emphasis upon the economic and constitutional phases and growth of the 
British Empire. Three credits each semester. 



History 353, 354— History of France. 

From the earliest time to the present, tracing the growth of the French 
nation state and the dominant role played by France in the intellectual 
and cultural life of Europe. Special attention is given to the French Revolu- 
tion and Napoleon, and the course of French history through the nineteenth 
century to the present. Three credits each semester. 

History 355, 356— History of Germany. 

From the first appearance of the Germanic peoples in the Roman Empire 
through the Medieval German Empire, its dissolution and the subsequent 
fragmentation of the German nation. The Renaissance and humanism; 
Luther and the Reformation. Particular emphasis on the Romantic movements 
in philosophy, literature and music. German Nationalism, Bismark's Empire, 
Hitler and the Third Reich. Three credits each semester. 



History 357, 358— History of Russia. 

Major social, political, economic and cultural developments from the 
foundation of the Kievan state to the present. First semester, medieval 
and eighteenth century Russia. Second semester, the revolutionary movement, 
the fall of the Old Regime, and the Soviet Era. Three credits each semester. 



History 359, 360- History of Spain. 

From the Moorish invasions to the present with particular emphasis upon 
the reconquest, the social and economic development in the sixteenth and 
seventeenth centuries, the demography of a pre-industrial society, the eighteenth 
century revolutions and the modern age. Three credits each semester. 

History 361, 362- European Social and Intellectual History. 

Selected studies of representative thinkers from St. Augustine to the present, 
emphasizing their place in the development of Western thought. Three 
credits each semester. 

History 370— Historiography. 

Designed to acquaint the student with the major historians, historical 
writings and trends in the discipline of history and some of the general 
philosophical theories of history. Three credits. 



The special Studies in History are devoted to special historical periods or 
topics. Their purpose is to acquaint the student with historical issues and 
literature by involving her in research and discussion. The focus, form, ahd 
content of each Special Studies course witl be determined by the instructor. 
Topics will be announced in the spring for the following academic year 
after consideration of student interest and staff availability. Prerequisite to 
all Special Studies courses: an appropriate 200 or 300 level course or per- 
mission of the instructor. 

History 490— Independent Historical Research. 

An introduction to the methods and tools of historical research with 
emphasis upon a formal paper, the subject to be chosen by the student. 
Required of history majors. Offered each semester. Three credits. 



147 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Home 
Economics 



History 491, 492— Special Studies in American History. 
Three credits each semester. 

History 493, 494— Special Studies in European History. 
Three credits each semester. 

History 495, 496— Special Studies in Latin American History. 
Three credits each semester. 

History 497, 498— Special Studies in Far Eastern History. 
Three credits each semester. 



HOME ECONOMICS/ Professor Guenndolyn A. Beeler, Chair- 
man; Assistant Professors R. Harris, Jamison. 



The Department of Home Economics offers as electives all 
courses for students in any curriculum. Credit may not be included 



in the total hours required for graduation if the student is ful- 
filling certification requirements, since a total of only twelve (12) 
credit hours is allowed in both home economics and education. 
The Home Economics Department is concerned with implementing 
the liberal arts program through courses which help prepare stu- 
dents to meet basic and human needs for effective living and for 
responsible participation in the community and the world. 

Home Economics 104- International Foods. 

A study of food patterns of various cultural groups and the way they meet 
the dietary needs of the people. Emphasis on the interrelationships of the 
contributions of Asian, European, African, Central and Latin American 
civilizations. Demonstrations of the preparation of typical meals of different 
cultures. Two single periods a week. Two credits. (Not offered in 1970-71.) 

Home Economics 112— Art of Costume. 

Consideration given to the theories of dress and adornment with implica- 
tions for individual application. Two credits. Two lectures. Either semester. 



148 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Home 
Economics 



Home Economics 211 — Contemporary Costume. 

Consideration given to Twentieth Century clothing in relation to factors 
influencing the production and consumption of wearing apparel for the satis- 
faction of human wants. A basic course for the beginning student in clothing 
construction. Three credits. Five lecture and laboratory hours. Either semester. 

Home Economics 212— Contemporary Costume. 

A study of the factors influencing apparel design and the various methods 
used in custom dressmaking and tailoring. A course designed for the student 
who has a background in clothing construction. Three credits. Five lecture 
and laboratory hours. Second semester. 



Home Economics 214— Costume Design. 

A creative approach to the study of dress and adornment. Original designs 
developed and creativity expressed through the medias of pattern-making 
and draping. Three credits. Five lecture and laboratory hours. Second 
semester. 

Home Economics 221, 222 + — Foods. 

Basic principles and fundamental processes involved in the selection and 
preparation of foods; emphasis on the aesthetic and sociological aspects of 
menu planning. Two double periods a week. Three credits each semester. 



Home Economics 231 — Nutrition. 

Principles of human nutrition and how such knowledge may be utilized 
to prevent ill health and promote a high level of physical fitness. Two single 
and one double periods a week. Three credits each semester. 



LIBERAL ARTS SEMINAR 

The Liberal Arts Seminars offer an opportunity for participa- 
tion in a planned program of reading, discussion, and assigned 
papers. Each seminar is directed by two members of the faculty, 
who share the responsibility for planning, conducting and evaluating 
the work done. A student who withdraws from the seminar at 
the end of the first semester may, upon the recommendation of 
the directors, receive credit for three semester hours. Enrollment 
is by permission of the instructors and is limited to eighteen 
students in each seminar. 

Liberal Arts Seminar I- II (For freshmen). 
Two one and one-half periods a week. Six credits. 

Liberal Art Seminar HI- IV (For sophomores, juniors and seniors). 
Two one and one-half periods a week. Six credits. 



MATHEMATICS/ Professor Hobart C. Carter, Chairman; Pro- 
fessor Sriaw; Associate Professor A. M. Harris; Assistant Pro- 
fessors Gardner, Jones, Pierce, Sarchet, Turner, Tyree, 
Zeleznock, Instructor Kemmler. 

Students who undertake a major program in mathematics are 
required to earn thirty-six credits in mathematics and related sub- 
jects. 

Twenty-four must be selected from courses in mathematics more 
advanced than Mathematics 1 11-112, Mathematical Analysis, and at 
least twelve must be earned in the following fields: 

Mathematics— Any 300 or 400 course undertaken in addition to 
the twenty-four credit requirement. 

Physics— Any course in physics. 

Astronomy— Any course in astronomy. 

Philosophy-Philosophy 221 , 344, 406 

Chemistry-Chemistry 393, 394. 

Economics— Economics 372. 

Freshmen who enter with four or more units of mathematics 
should consult the chairman of the department for placement. 



149 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Liberal A rts 

Seminar 
Mathematics 



Mathematics 111- 112— Mathematical Analysis. 

This course includes topics from set theory, logic, mathematical founda- 
tions, college algebra, trigonometry, analytic geometry, and an introduction to 
calculus. Three periods a week. Six credits. 

Mathematics 211-212- Calculus. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 111-112. Differential and integral calculus. Three 
periods a week. Six credits. 

Mathematics 301, 302-Higher Algebra. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 211-212. Number theory, groups, fields, matrices, 
rings, ideals. Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. 

Mathematics 312— Differential Equations. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 211-212. Ordinary differential equations with ap- 
plications and an introduction to partial differential equations. Three periods 
a week. Three credits. 



Mathematics 341, 342— Advanced Calculus. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 211-212. Three periods a week. Three credits 
each semester. 



150 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Mathematics 



Mathematics 411- Vectors and Matrices. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 341. The algebra and calculus of vectors and 
an introduction to the theory of matrices. Three periods a week. Three 
credits. 

Mathematics 412— Complex Variables. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 342 or consent of instructor. Analytic functions, 
Cauchy-Riemann conditions, integration, power series, calculus of residues, 
conformal mappings, and applications. Three periods a week. Three credits. 



Mathematics 431, 432— Higher Geometry. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 211-212. Basic ideas and methods of higher 
geometry; the geometries associated with the projective group of transforma- 
tion; applications to affine and metric geometries. Three periods a week. 
Three credits each semester. 



Mathematics 435, 436— Selected Topics in Mathematics. 

A program of independent study under the direction of a member of the 
staff. Open to senior majors with the permission of the department. Three 
credits each semester. 



Mathematics 441 — General Topology. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 301. Point-set theory; simplexes and complexes; 
topological invariance; introduction to homology and homotopy theory. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. 



Mathematics 446— Probability 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 211-212. Definitions of probability, combinatorial 
analysis, combination of events, conditional probability, common distributions, 
random variables, and recurrent events. Three periods a week. Three credits. 

Mathematics 451, 452— Numerical and Graphical Analysis. 

Prerequisite: Mathematics 211-212. Numerical and graphical methods applied 
to the following: solution of equations; interpolation; differentiation; integra- 
tion; and solution of differential equations. Three periods a week. Three 
credits each semester. 



MODERN FOREIGN LANGUAGES/ Professor Mary Ellen 
Stephenson, Chairman; Professors Bolling, Greene, Hoge, E. 
Jones, McIntosh, Rivera; Associate Prof essors Antony, Blessing , 
Bozicevic, Herman, Hofmann, Perez; Assistant Professors 
Manolis, Nakoi; Instructors Capelle, Dagnino, deFlorio, 
Looney, McLees, Ohtani, Schneller, Sendra; Assistant In- 
structors L. Mann, Robbins. 



Major programs are offered in French, German, and Spanish. 

Course sequences in Italian and Russian are also available. 
Two years of Portuguese are offered for related studies if there is 
sufficient demand. 

Students applying for admission to the College must take a 
College Board Achievement Test in a foreign language. If this 
test is taken in a modern foreign language, students planning to 
continue in that language will be advised of the level of the course 
in which they should enroll. 

A student who has high school credit for two or three units in 
a foreign language will not receive credit for a beginning course 
in that language. 

A student who has high school credit for four years in a foreign 
language will not receive credit for an intermediate course in that 
language. 

Students who read, write, and speak a language other than 
English may receive credit only for advanced courses in that 
language. 

The foreign language is the language of the classroom for all 
courses numbered 200 and above. Other levels will use the foreign 
language as much as student preparation and progress allow. 

To insure majors an acquaintance with all acknowledged master- 
pieces of the literature, the department offers a guided reading 
program. 



151 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Modem Foreign 
Languages 



Each student in elementary and intermediate classes in Modern 
Foreign Languages will spend a minimum of one and one half 
hours a week in the Language Laboratory as a part of her pre- 
paration beyond and above scheduled class sessions. 



152 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Modern Foreign 
Languages 



French 

Students who undertake a major program in French must take 
thirty-six credits in French and related subjects. These credits 
are to be distributed in the following manner: 

1. Twenty-four credits in French, chosen from courses numbered 
300 or higher and including French 305-306 and French 407-408. 

2. In related fields, twelve credits selected from the following: 
Two courses in the 100 group from another foreign lan- 
guage 12 credits 

A course in the 200 group from another foreign 

language 6 credits 

A course in the 300 or the 400 group from another 

foreign language 6 credits 

A course in the 300 group of English literature ... 6 credits 
Art 312, 313, Medieval Art; Art 315, 316, Seventeenth and 
Eighteenth Century Art; or Art 451, 452, Nineteenth and 

Twentieth Century Art 6 credits 

History 235, Early Modern Europe; History 236, 
Modern Europe; and History 353, 354, History 

of France 6 credits 

Philosophy 322, Medieval Philosophy, and Philosophy 
401, Philosophy Since the Renaissance 6 credits 



French majors in the junior and senior year are required to 
read and to report in the language of their major on books in 
the literary periods not covered by classes they have taken. 

Each French major should reside for one session in the French 
House. 

French 101-102— Begin n ing French. 

For students who enter college with fewer than two units in high school 
French. Five periods a week, two of which will be laboratory periods. Six 
credits. 



French 103- 104— Intermediate French. 

Prerequisite: French 101-102 or two to three units in high school French. 
Grammar review; varied reading; oral work with emphasis on the language 
laboratory. Three periods a week. Six credits. 



French 107-108— Fundamentals of French Pronunciation and 

Conversation. 

Prerequisite: French 101-102 or two units of high school French. A basic 
or remedial course for serious students who lack the proficiency in French 
which would make them eligible for French 203-204. Does not provide credit 
toward the major in French or the language requirements. Two periods a 
week. One credit each semester. 

French 201-202— Introduction to French Literature. 

Prerequisite: French 103-104 or four units of high school French. Selected 
readings from all periods of French literature. Three periods a week. Six 
credits. 

French 203- 204— French Conversation. 

Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or proof of proficiency at this level. 
A course offered especially for majors or those planning to live in the French 
House, but open to others with permission of the instructor. Two periods 
a week. Two credits. 



French 205- 206— Survey of French Literature. 

Open only to French majors and to certain other students who have 
demonstrated unusual ability in the language. Prerequisite: French 103-104 
or four units of high school French. Lectures, reports, and selections from 
representative writers. Three periods a week. Six credits. 

French 212— Studies in Language I. 

Grammar and composition. Recommended for majors. Open to students 
who have completed 4 years of high school French or French 103-104. 
Three periods a week. One semester. Three credits. THIS COURSE MAY 
NOT BE SELECTED TO SATISFY THE LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT. 
(Offered each spring semester.) 

THE PREREQUISITE FOR 300 AND 400 LEVEL COURSES IS SATIS- 
FACTORY COMPLETION OF FRENCH 205-206, OR PERMISSION OF 
THE INSTRUCTOR. 



153 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Modern Foreign 
Languages 



French 301 — Literature of the Middle Ages. 
Three hours a week. Three credits. 

French 302— Literature of the Sixteenth Century. 
Three hours a week. Three credits. 

French 303— Drama of the Seventeenth Century. 
Three hours a week. Three credits. 



French 304— Non-dramatic Literature of the Seventeenth Century. 
Three hours a week. Three credits. 



French 305- 306— Studies in Language II. 

Advanced grammar and composition. Translation. Required of majors. 



154 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Modern Foreign 
Languages 



Others by permission of the instructor. Three periods. Six credits. 

French 307— The Novel of the Nineteenth Century. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. 

French 308- The Novel of the Twentieth Century. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. 

French 309, 310- French Civilization. 

Prerequisite: French 103-104 or four units of high school French. Geo- 
graphy, history, and the political and cultural background of France and the 
French people. THIS COURSE MAY NOT BE SELECTED TO SATISFY 
THE LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT. Three periods a week. Three credits 
each semester. 

French 401— Twentieth Century Theatre. 
Three hours a week. Three credits. 

French 402— Twentieth Century Poetry. 
Three hours a week. Three credits. 

French 403— The Literature of Eighteenth Century Philosophers. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. 

French 404— The Theatre and the Novel of the Eighteenth Century. 
Three hours a week. Three credits. 

French 407-408— French Conversation. 

Required of majors unless excused after examination by the department. 
Two periods a week. Two credits. 

French 409— Nineteenth Century Romanticism in the Theatre and in 
Poetry. 
Three hours a week. Three credits. 

French 410— Nineteenth Century Post-Romantic Theatre and Poetry 
(The Parnasse and Symbolism). 
Three hours a week. Three credits. 

French 411, 412+— Senior Seminar in French. 

Open to seniors with permission of department. Three hours a week. 
Three credits each semester. 



French 491 — Independent Study. 

Individual study under the direction of a member of the staff. Three 
credits a semester for not more than two semesters. (By permission of the 
department.) 



French for Graduate Reading Examinations 

An intensive non-credit course in reading French offered to individuals 
working on graduate degrees. It is designed to prepare the individual for 
foreign language examinations given to fulfill requirements toward a Masters 
or Ph.D. degree. 



German 

Students who choose a major program in German must take 
thirty-six credits in German and related subjects. These credits 
are to be distributed in the following manner: 

1 . Twenty-four credits in German chosen from courses numbered 
300 or higher, including German 357-358. 

2. In related fields, twelve credits selected from the following: 
Two courses in the 100 group from another foreign lan- 
guage 12 credits 

A course in the 200 group from another 

foreign language 6 credits 

A course in the 300 or 400 group from another 

foreign language 6 credits 

English 425, 426, Shakespeare 6 credits 

History 355, 356, History of Germany 6 credits 

History 361 , 362, European Social and 

Intellectual History 6 credits 

German majors must complete during their junior and senior 
years readings outlined by their advisers to cover periods of litera- 
ture never covered in class. 



755 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Modern Foreign 
Languages 



German 151-152— Beginning German. 

For students offering fewer than two units in high school German. Funda- 
mentals of grammar, composition, conversation, and reading. Five periods a 
week, two of which are laboratory periods. Six credits. 

German 153-154— Intermediate German. 

Prerequisite: German 151-152 or two to three units of high school Ger- 
man. Grammar review and conversation; reading of modern German texts. 
Three periods a week. Six credits. 

German 155-156— German Conversation. 

Prerequisite: sophomore standing or proof of proficiency at this level. Two 
periods a week. Two credits. 



German 251-252— Introduction to German Literature and Civilization. 

Prerequisite: German 153-154 or four units of high school German. A 
study through selected texts of the literary and cultural background of the 
German people. Three periods a week. Six credits. 



THE PREREQUISITE FOR 300 AND 400 LEVEL COURSES IS SATIS- 
FACTORY COMPLETION OF GERMAN 251-252, OR PERMISSION 
OF THE INSTRUCTOR. 

German 351-352— Advanced Grammar and Composition. 
Required of majors. Three periods a week. Six credits. 



from 



the Earliest Times 



German 355, 356+- German Literature 
Through the Eighteenth Century. 

Emphasis on the epic of the Middle Ages, the literature of the Baroque 
Period and the Age of Enlightenment. Three periods a week. Three credits 
each semester. 



German 357, 358+— German Classicism and Romanticism. 
Fall semester: literature of the classic movement; spring semester: literature 
of the romantic schools. Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. 

German 451, 452— Nineteenth Century Literature. 
Lectures, readings, and reports. Three periods a week. Three credits each 
semester. 



156 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Modem Foreign 
Languages 



German 453- 454— Advanced German Conversation. 
Required of majors unless excused after examination by the department, 
periods a week. Two credits. 



Two 



German 455, 456+— Modern German Literature. 

A study of representative works from 1890 to the present. Three periods 
a week. Three credits each semester. 

German 457, 458- Goethe's "Faust." 

A thorough study and interpretation of this great masterpiece and its 
background. Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. 



German 459, 460+- Readings in German. 

Open to seniors by permission of the department. One period a week. One 
credit each semester. 

German 461, 462+- Goethe's Faust in Translation. 
Taught in English. Not accepted as Foreign Language requirement toward 
degree. Two hours a week. Two credits each semester. 



German 491 — Independent Study. 

Individual study under the direction of a member of the staff. Three 
credits a semester for not more than two semesters. (By permission of the 
department.) 




German for Graduate Reading Examinations. 

An intensive non-credit course in reading German offered to individuals 
working on graduate degrees. It is designed to prepare the individual for 
foreign language examinations given to fulfill requirements toward a Masters 
or Ph.D. degree. 

Italian 

Italian 161-162— Beginning Italian. 

For students who enter college with fewer than two units of high school 
Italian. Fundamentals of grammar and pronunciation; reading and conversa- 
tion. Five periods a week, two in the laboratory. Six credits. 



Italian 163- 164-Intermediate Italian. 

Prerequisite: Italian 161-162 or two units of high school Italian. A review 
of grammatical principles; readings of selected texts, collateral reading. Three 
periods a week. Six credits. 

Italian 165- 166— Italian Conversation. 

Prerequisite: Italian 161-162 or two years of high school Italian. Two 
periods a week. Two credits. 

Italian 261- 262— Introduction to Italian Literature and Civilization. 

Prerequisite: Italian 163-164 or four units of high school Italian. A study 
based on Italian texts of the literary and cultural history of Italian people. 
Three periods a week. Six credits. 



157 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Modem Foreign 
Languages 



Italian 263, 264+- Dante in Translation. 

A study of Dante's Divine Comedy together with background material 
both literary and historical of the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries. This 
course will be given in English. Not accepted as part of the foreign language 
requirement for a degree. Two periods a week. Two credits each semester. 

Italian 361, 362 + — Nineteenth Century Literature. 

Readings from Italian literature with emphasis on the novel and drama 
of the nineteenth century. Three periods a week. Two credits each semester. 



Italian 461, 462 +- Dante. 

A study of Dante's Divine Comedy and the early Italian poets. Three 
periods a week. Three credits each semester. 



Italian 491— Independent Study. 

Individual study under the direction of a member of the staff. Three credits 
a semester for not more than two semesters. (By permission of the depart- 
ment.) 

Japanese 

Japanese 181- 182— Beginning Japanese. 

For students beginning the study of Japanese. Five periods a week, one 
of which is scheduled to the laboratory. Six credits. 

Japanese 183- 184— Intermediate Japanese. 

Prerequisite: Japanese 181-182. Four periods a week. Six credits. 

Portuguese 



158 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Modern Foreign 
Languages 



Portuguese 141- 142— Beginning Portuguese. 

For students who enter college with fewer than two units in high school 
Portuguese. Grammar and readings; conversation based on the Brazilian 
pronunciation. Five periods a week, two in the laboratory. Six credits. 

Portuguese 143- 144— Intermediate Portuguese. 

Prerequisite: Portuguese 141-142 or two to three units in high school 
Portuguese. A brief review of grammar; reading and discussion of modern 
Brazilian literature, conversation. Three periods a week. Six credits. 

Portuguese 491— Independent Study. 

Individual study under the direction of a member of the staff. Three 
credits a semester for not more than two semesters. (By permission of the 
department.) 



Russian 

Russian 171- 172— Beginning Russian. 

For students who enter college with fewer than two units in Russian. 
The basic vocabulary and fundamental grammatical structure of the language; 
practice in conversation and reading of easy Russian texts. Five periods a 
week, two of them in the laboratory. Six credits. 

Russian 173- 174— Intermediate Russian. 

Prerequisite: Russian 171-172 or equivalent. Thorough review of grammar; 
reading of selected texts from modern prose writers; conversation on topics 
of current interest. Three periods a week. Six credits. 



Russian 271-272— Introduction to Russian Literature and Civilization. 

Prerequisite: Russian 173-174 or equivalent. Readings and discussion of 
excerpts and short works with emphasis on nineteenth century literary masters 
and their times. Three periods a week. Six credits. 



Russian 273-274— Russian Conversation. 

Prerequisite: Russian 171-172 or equivalent. Two periods a week. Two 
credits. (On sufficient demand only) 

Russian 371-372— So viet Russian Literature. 

Prerequisite: Russian 173-174 or equivalent. Reading and analysis of repre- 
sentative works by Soviet Russian writers such as Gor'kii, Sholokhov, 
Maiakosvkii, Leonov, Fadeev, Pasternak, and others. Three periods a week. 
Six credits. 

Russian 311— Russian Literature in English Translation— XIX Century 
No knowledge of Russian required. Will not fulfill the language requirement. 
Core course for Russian Studies major. Readings, discussions, and lectures 
with emphasis on nineteenth century writers— Pushkin, Lermontov, Gogol', 
Turgenev, Dostoevskii, Tolstoi, and others. Three periods a week. Three 
credits. 



Russian 378— Russian Literature in English Translation— XX Century 
No knowledge of Russian required. Will not fulfill the language requirement. 
Core course for Russian Studies major. Readings, discussions, and lectures 
with emphasis on twentieth century writers— Gor'kii, Blok, Bulgakov, Zamiatin, 
Sholokhov, Leonov, Fadeev, Pasternak, Evtushenko, Solzhenitsyn, and others. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. 

Russian 491 — Independent Study. 

Individual study under the direction of a member of the staff. Three 
credits a semester for not more than two semesters. (By permission of the 
department.) 

Spanish 

Students who choose a major program in Spanish must take 
thirty-six credits in Spanish and related subjects. These credits are 
to be distributed in the following manner. 

1. Twenty-four credits in Spanish, chosen from courses num- 
bered 300 or higher and including a six-hour course in 
Spanish-American Literature. Spanish 327-328 and Spanish 
433-434 are also required unless the student is excused after 
an examination by the department. 

2. In related fields, twelve credits selected from the following: 
Two courses in the 100 group from another 

foreign language 12 credits 

A course in the 200 group from another foreign 

language 6 credits 

A course in the 300 or 400 group from another 

foreign language 6 credits 

History 359, 360, History of Spain, 

History 357, 358, Latin American History and 



159 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Modern Foreign 
Languages 



History 451-452, Social and Intellectual History of 

Latin America 12 credits 

English 335, 336, Nineteenth Century English or 

English 365, 366, Modern English Literature 6 credits 

Philosophy 322, Medieval Philosophy, and Philosophy 

401, Philosophy Since the Renaissance 6 credits 

Courses in Geography or Political Science 

of Latin American content 6 or 

more credits 

Spanish majors must complete during their junior and senior 
years readings outlined by their advisers to cover periods of litera- 
ture never studied in class. Each Spanish major should live in the 
Spanish House during at least one year of her college course. 



160 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Modem Foreign 
Languages 



Spanish 121- 122— Beginning Spanish. 

For students who enter College with fewer than two units of High School 
Spanish. Five hours a week, two of them in the laboratory. Six credits. 

Spanish 123- 124— Intermediate Spanish. 

Prerequisite: Spanish 121-122 or two or three units of high school Spanish. 
Conversation and composition; varied readings; review of grammatical 
principles; practice in the language laboratory. Three periods a week. Six 
credits. 

Spanish 214— Studies in Language I. 

Grammar and composition. Recommended for majors. Open to students 
who have completed four years of high school Spanish or Spanish 123-124. 
Three periods a week. One semester. Three credits. THIS COURSE MAY 
NOT BE SELECTED TO SATISFY THE LANGUAGE REQUIREMENT. 



Prerequisites for 200-level courses are satisfactory completion of Spanish 
123-124 and/or proof of proficiency at this level. 

Spanish 219-220— Introduction to Spanish- American Literature. 
Selected readings from the works of great writers of various periods. 
Three periods a week. Six credits. 

Spanish 221-222— Introduction to Spanish Literature. 

Prerequisite: Spanish 123-124 or four units of high school Spanish. Readings 
from the works of the great writers of various periods. Three periods a week. 
Six credits. 



Spanish 225-226— Spanish Conversation. 

A course offered especially for majors or those living in the Spanish 
House, but open to others with the permission of the instructor. Two 
periods a week. Two credits. 



Spanish 227, 228 + — Spanish and Spanish American Civilization. 

A survey of Spanish and Spanish American History and institutions, with 
attention devoted to their ethnic, political, and artistic aspects. THIS COURSE 
MAY NOT BE SELECTED TO SATISFY THE LANGUAGE REQUIRE- 
MENT. Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. 

Spanish 231— The Novelas Ejemplares and Entremeses of Cervantes. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. 

Spanish 232— The Drama of the Golden Age. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. 

Spanish 233— Drama of Spain after 1850. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. 

Spanish 234— Spanish Fiction of the Nineteenth Century. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. 

Spanish 235— Poetry of Spain. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. 



Spanish 236— The Generation of 1898 in Spain. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. 

Spanish 237— The Poetry of Spanish America. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. 

Spanish 238— The Literature of Mexico and Central America. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. 



161 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Modern Foreign 
Languages 



Spanish 239- The Fiction of Spanish America. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. 

Spanish 240— The Essay of Spanish America. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. 

THE PREREQUISITE FOR 300 AND 400 LEVEL COURSES IS THE 
SATISFACTORY COMPLETION OF SIX HOURS OF 200 LEVEL LITERA- 
TURE CLASSES AND/OR PERMISSION OF THE INSTRUCTOR. 

Spanish 321, 322+— Literature of the Middle Ages, Renaissance, 

and Eighteenth Century. 
Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. 

Spanish 325— Nineteenth Century Romanticism. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. 



Spanish 326— Post- Roman tic Drama and Poetry 
Three periods a week. Three credits. 



Spanish 327-328— Studies in Language II. 

Advanced composition and grammar. Required of majors. Three periods 
a week. Six credits. 

Spanish 329— Spanish American Literature of the Period of the 
Conquest. 

Three periods a week. Three credits. 

Spanish 330— Spanish American Literature of the XVII and XVIII 

Centuries. 

Three periods a week. Three credits. 

Spanish 331, 332- The Novel of the XIX Century. 
Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. 

Spanish 42\-The Drama of the XX Century. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. 

Spanish 422— Poetry of the XX Century. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. 



162 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Modern Foreign 
Languages 



Spanish 423, 424+- Twentieth Century Prose. 
Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. 

Spanish 425, 426 + - Drama and Poetry of the Golden Age in Spain. 
Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. 

Spanish 427, 42H+-The Novel of the Golden Age in Spain. 
Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. 



Spanish 429, 430+— Nineteenth Century Literature in Spanish America. 
Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. 

Spanish 431, 432+— Twentieth Century Literature of Spanish America. 
Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. 

Spanish 433, 434— Advanced Conversation. 

Required of majors unless excused after examination by the department. 
Two periods a week. Two credits. 

Spanish 435, 436 -Readings in Spanish. 

Open to seniors with permission of the department. Three periods a week, 
three credits each semester. 



Spanish 491- Independent Study. 

Individual study under the direction of a member of the staff. Three 
credits each semester for not more than two semesters. (By permission of the 
department.) 



MUSIC/ Professor George E. Luntz, Chairman; Professor Bulley; 
Associate Professors Chauncey, Edson, Hamer, L. Houston, 
Lemoine; Assistant Professor Baker; Instructors Chalifoux, 
Fickett, Sabine. 

The Department of Music offers a major program in music as 
well as courses that can be chosen as electives by students whose 
primary interests are in other fields. 

The Department of Music is an Institutional Member of the 
National Association of Schools of Music, and its courses are 
fully accredited by that organization. 

A major program requires that a student pass a preliminary 
audition and basic test, earn a minimum of thirty-six credits 
in music, demonstrate functional proficiency in piano, and acquire 
the ability to perform well in some area of applied music.** 
Twenty-four credits must be taken in the following courses: 

Music 181-182, Harmony and Ear Training 6 credits 

Music 281-282, Advanced Harmony and Ear 
Training 6 credits 

Music 305, 306, History of Music 4 credits 

Music 391-392, Counterpoint 4 credits 

Music 491-492, Form and Analysis 4 credits 

Students majoring in music should take Music 181-182 in the 
freshman year. 

Twelve additional credits are to be taken in courses selected 
from the following: 

Music 291 , History of Musical Instruments 

Music 315, Twentieth Century Music 

Music 321-322, Conducting 

Music 395, 396, Orchestration 

Music 175, 176, 275, 276, Band and Orchestra Instruments 

Music 405, 406, Choral Music 

Music 407, 408, Music and English Literature 

Music 415, 416, Opera 

Music 421 , 422, Studies in Musical Style 

Music 493-494, Independent Study 

Music 495, 496, Composition 

Applied Music 

It is also possible for students to take courses in music in 
addition to those required by the major program. These courses 
may be considered as electives in fulfilling degree requirements. 
However, each student majoring in music should plan her work 
in consultation with the chairman of the department. 

*On leave 1969-70. 

**No Fees For Applied Music. 



163 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Music 



The following courses are suggested as valuable electives for the 
student majoring in music: 

Art 111 and 112, Art History 

Dramatic Arts 211, Survey of World Theatre 

Philosophy 212, Aesthetics 

In order to qualify for a Virginia teaching certificate in music, 
students should also take the necessary courses in psychology, 
including three semester hours in Child Psychology or Adolescent 
Psychology; six semester hours in School Music; and six semester 
hours in Supervised Teaching in Music. 

Six semester hours of social science in addition to History of 
the United States and six semester hours of mathematics are 
required for Virginia teacher certification. 

Teacher certification in Virginia also requires eighteen semester 
hours in performance instruction. This includes courses in con- 
ducting, instrumental classes, participation in chorus, band, or 
other regular ensemble groups, and individual instruction in 
applied music. 



164 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Music 



Theory of Music 



Music 181- 182— Harmony and Ear Training. 

Fundamentals of music chord-structure and progressions. Figured bass and 
given melodies, dominant sevenths. Original work. Melodic, rhythmic, and 
harmonic dictation, sight-singing and keyboard harmony. Five periods a week. 
Six credits. 



Music 281- 282- Advanced Harmony and Ear Training. 

Prerequisite: Music 181-182. Advanced harmony and its use in traditional 
musical styles. Modulation, complete dominant harmony, altered chords, 
and enharmonic relationships. Harmonic analysis. Keyboard and ear training 
skills. Five periods a week. Six credits. 

Music 285, 286 + - Instrumental Sight Reading. 

(Enrollment by permission of instructor.) Class designed to increase sight- 
reading ability by means of both playing and following the printed score. 
Also a retainer course for those who wish to keep up their instrumental 
technique, whether they are currently studying or not. Two periods a week. 
No credit. 



Music 301 , 302; 311, 312+ -School Music. 

Essentials of school music materials and procedures involved in teaching 
songs, rhythmic and instrumental work, and listening. Coordination with 
other subjects. Course 301-302 (Two hours a week. One credit each semester.) 
is for non-music majors expecting to teach in the elementary grades. Course 



311, 312 (Three hours a week. Three credits each semester.) is for music 
majors who expect to teach music in elementary or secondary schools. 

Music 321 , 322 +— Conducting. 

Principles and techniques of conducting, including the study of materials, 
arranging, and program planning. First semester, choral conducting; second 
semester, instrumental conducting. Two periods a week. Two credits each 
semester. 

Music 391- 392- Counterpoint. 

Prerequisite or co-requisite: Music 281-282. Elementary contrapuntal techni- 
ques, including double counterpoint at the octave. Two periods a week. 
Four credits. 

Music 395, 396— Orchestration. 

Techniques of instrumental scoring considered historically and creatively. 
Two periods a week. Four credits. 

Music 491 , 492— Form and Analysis. 

Prerequisite: Music 281-282. Structural and harmonic analysis of both large 
and small forms of composition. Two periods a week. Four credits. 



Music 495, 496— Composition. 

Prerequisite: Music 281-282. Creative work in smaller forms. Correlative 
study of traditional and contemporary compositional practices. Two periods 
a week. Four credits. 

History and Literature of Music. 

Music 111 , 112+— Survey of Music. 

General survey of music and its relationship to general culture and history. 
Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. 



165 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Music 



Music 291 — The History of Musical Instruments. 

A study of the evolution of musical instruments in western culture from 
antiquity through the present day with emphasis on performance practices 
of the times and their relationships to the symphony orchestra. Two periods 
per week. Two credits. 

Music 305, 306 + - History of Music. 

Study of the development of music from ancient to modern times with 
special correlation of historical and cultural trends. Two periods a week. 
Two credits each semester. 



Music 315— Twentieth Century Music. 

Prerequisite: Music 111-112 or Music 305, 306 or special permission of 
the instructor. The study of twentieth century practices in musical composi- 
tion and their relationships to the historical developments in music. Two 
periods a week. Two credits. Offered each semester. 



166 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Music 



Music 405, 406 + - Choral Music. 

Study of sacred and secular choral literature, including both the vocal 
and interpretative aspects. Consideration of textual as well as musical content. 
Two periods a week. Two credits each semester. (Offered in alternate years 
Not offered in 1969-70.) 

Music 407, 408+- Music and English Literature. 

A study of musical compositions inspired by English literature from Chaucer 
to the present day. (A theoretical and practical background of music is not 
essential for this course) Two periods a week. Two credits each semester. 
(Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 1969-70.) 

Music 415, 416 + — Opera. 

Literary and musical development of the opera; staging and scenic devices. 
Comparison of operatic styles through study and listening. Two periods a 
week. Two credits each semester. (Offered in alternate years. Offered in 
1969-70.) 

Music 421- 422 + - Studies in Musical Style. 

A study of style related to period, nationality, and individual composers. 
Two periods a week. Four credits. (Offered in alternate years. Offered in 
1969-70.) 

Music 493, 494+— Independent Study. 

Individual study under the direction of a member of the music department 
faculty. From two to six credits. (By permission of the department.) 

Band and Orchestra Instruments 

Music 175, 116— Beginning String Instruments. 

Class study of playing techniques on string instruments, including reference 
to their historical development and literature. Two periods a week. Two 
credits for the session. (Not offered in 1969-70.) 

Music 275— Beginning Woodwind and Percussion Instruments. 
Class study of playing techniques on woodwind instruments and on snare 
drum, including reference to their historical development and literature. 
Two periods a week, first semester. One credit. (Offered in 1969-70.) 

Music 216— Beginning Brass and Percussion Instruments. 

Class study of playing techniques on brass instruments and on percussion 
instruments, including reference to their historical development and literature. 
Two periods a week, second semester. One credit. (Offered in 1969-70.) 



Band, Chorus, And String Ensemble 

The College maintains a concert band, chorus, and string 
ensemble. Any student may, with the permission of the conductor, 
participate in the band, chorus, or string ensemble, but will be 



allowed a combined maximum of six credits in ensemble participa- 
tion. However, band, chorus, or string ensemble may be taken 
without credit. Each organization has two rehearsals a week and 
gives one credit each semester. 

Individual Instruction in Music 

Individual lessons in voice, piano, organ, violoncello, harp, 
and woodwinds are offered by the department. 

Credit is allowed for a maximum of twelve semester hours in 
individual instruction. 

For study of above named subjects one credit is allowed for 
one half-hour lesson a week plus one hour of practice daily; two 
credits are allowed for one one-hour lesson or two half-hour 
lessons a week plus two hours of practice daily. 

Instructors in individual lessons are: Mrs. Anne Hamer, 
violoncello and piano; Mrs. Yvonne Sabine, voice; Mrs. Jean 
Edson, organ; Mr. Levin Houston, piano; Mr. Bernard Lemoine,* 
piano; Mrs. Martha Fickett, piano; Mr. George Luntz, voice; 
Mr. James Baker, woodwinds; Miss Jeanne Chalifoux, harp. 



167 



"On leave 1969-70. 




COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Music 



PHILOSOPHY /Professor George M. Van Sant, Chairman; 
Professor Leidecker; Assistant Professors Bonyhard, Snyder. 



168 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Philosophy 



Students who choose a major program in philosophy complete 
at least twenty-four credits in philosophy in addition to the 
philosophy 101, 102 course required of all students for the 
Bachelor of Arts degree. Students also complete twelve credtis 
in related subjects. These subjects are to be selected in consultation 
with the student's adviser. Any 300 or 400 course in appropriate 
departments is acceptable (exceptions are Classics and Religion 
department courses numbered 201 and 202). A list of courses 
recommended as related fields is available from the department. 

Majors in philosophy are expected to include at least four of 
the five following courses comprising the history of philosophy: 
Philosophy 321, 322, 371, 372, 373. Majors are required to do 
some reading that is pertinent to those philosophy courses in 
which they do not enroll. This complementary reading may be 
done at any time during the student's junior or senior years. 
The list of readings is available from the department. 

A program of Independent Study (tutorial) is offered to highly 
qualified students upon approval by the department. This may 
apply to Philosophy 102 or to specialization in the work of a single 
philosopher or philosophical problem. 



Philosophy 101, 102— Problems in Philosophy. 

Open to freshmen and sophomores only. An introduction to philosophical 
methods and concepts. Three periods a week. Six credits. 

Philosophy 101, 102 meets the basic degree requirement (alternate with 
mathematics) for the Bachelor of Arts degree and must be taken in the 
freshman or sophomore year. In exceptional cases, such as transfer students 
admitted at the beginning of their junior year, the basic requirement may 
be met by earning six credits in the following courses: 

Philosophy 221, Introductory Logic; 406, Advanced Logic; 

Philosophy 321, Greek Philosophy; 

Philosophy 322, Medieval Philosophy; 

Philosophy 371, 17th and 18th Century Philosophy; 

Philosophy 372, Kant; 

Philosophy 373, 19th and 20th Century Philosophy. 



Philosophy 103-Independent Study. 

The content of Philosophy 102 when done as a tutorial by highly qualified 
students under the direction of a member of the staff. Three credits. 



Philosophy 211- Ethics. 

An introductory study of a variety of moral theories and an examination 
of terms used in moral assessment, with particular reference to such problems 
as the status and justification of moral judgments, and the nature of dis- 
agreement in moral issues. Three periods a week. Second semester. Three 
credits. 

Philosophy 212— Aesthetics. 

An examination of a variety of attempts to validate norms of taste and of 
criticism. Attention is given to problems specific to particular art forms as 
well as to the more general theories about the nature of art, and of responses 
to it. Three periods a week. First semester. Three credits. 

Philosophy 221— Introductory Logic. 

The elementary principles of valid reasoning to introduce the arts and 
sciences student to logic and language, elementary symbolic logic and simple 
deductive systems. Three periods a week. First semester. Three credits. 

Philosophy 304— American Philosophy . 

A study of philosophical ideas in America from colonial times to their 
reorientation between World Wars I and II. Special emphasis is given to 
pragmatism. Three periods a week. Three credits. 

Philosophy 311— Philosophies of India. 

An approach to the germinal philosophic thoughts of the Vedas, Upanishads, 
and Bhagavad Gita, leading up the the classical philosophic systems of 
Sankhya, Yoga and Vedanta, with a tangential treatment of Jainism, Tantra 
and Kashmir Shaivism. Three periods a week. First semester. Three credits. 

Philosophy 312— Philosophies of China and Japan. 

A study principally of Taoism and Confucianism and of schools based 
on or in opposition to these, with emphasis on the idiosyncratic contributions 
of the Chinese language to thought, the impact of Buddhism, and the 
further development of concepts and systems in Japan. Three periods a week. 
Second semester. Three credits. 

Philosophy 313— The Philosophy of Buddhism. 

A survey of the ethics of the Buddha, the Abhidhamma portion of the 
buddhist canon, the main schools of the Theravada and Hahayana traditions 
with their principal exponents, and the origin and meaning of Zen. Three 
periods a week. Second semester. Three credits. (Offered in alternate years, 
not offered in 1970-71.) 



169 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Philosophy 



Philosophy 321— Greek Philosophy. 

A study primarily of selected works of Plato and Aristotle with special 
attention given to the origin and development of epistemological and meta- 
physical problems. Three periods a week. First semester. Three credits. 



Philosophy 322— Medieval Philosophy. 

A survey of scholastic philosophy. Special consideration is given to the 
works of Augustine, Thomas Aquinas and William of Ockham. Three 
periods a week. Second semester. Three credits. 

Philosophy 331— Philosophies of History. 

A survey of philosophical attempts to construct theories concerning the 
patterns of history. Two periods a week. Two credits. 

Philosophy 343— Existentialism and Phenomenology. 

A study of recent philosophical developments in the continental European 
tradition. Includes such writers as Kierkegaard, Nietzsche, Husserl, Heidegger, 
Marcel, Merleau-Ponty, Jaspers, and Sartre. Three periods a week. Three 
credits. 

Philosophy 344— History of Scientific Thought. 

A study of the classics in the development of scientific thinking. Special 
attention is given to the significant discoveries, the methods and the pre- 
suppositions which have characterized the different phases of the develop- 
ment of science. Prerequisite: Eight semester hours of laboratory science. 
Three periods a week. Second semester. Three credits. (Offered in alternate 
years, offered in 1970-71.) 



170 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Philosophy 



Philosophy 352— Philosophy East and West. 

A study of basic concepts in ethics, aesthetics, logic and metaphysics 
embodied in the philosophical, religious and literary patterns of various 
Oriental cultures and a comparison of them with similar patterns in Western 
civilization with the objective of tracing parallels and influences and bringing 
to light differences as well as identities with implications for developing 
contemporary and global perspectives. Three periods a week. First semester. 
Three credits (Offered in alternate years, not offered in 1970-71.) 



Philosophy 361 — Metaphysics. 

A study of problems such as being, reality, space, time, causality, chance, 
freedom, and identity that are basic to an intellectual comprehension of the 
universe and the processes of mind and nature. Three periods a week. Three 
credits. (Offered in alternate years, offered in 1970-71.) 

Philosophy 371— 17th and 18th Century Philosophy. 

A survey of major thinkers from Descartes to Hume, with particular em- 
phasis on the relation and contributions of these thinkers to contemporary 
thought. Three periods a week. Three credits. 



Philosophy 372- Kant. 

A systematic study of selected major works of Immanuel Kant. The im- 
pact of Kant's thought on subsequent philosophical views is emphasized. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. 



Philosophy 373— 19th and 20th Century Philosophy. 
A critical consideration of major thinkers and movements from Hegel to 
the present. Three periods a week. Three credits. 

Philosophy 406-Advanced Logic. 

Theory of formal systems; applied criteria of consistency, completeness, 
and decisional procedures. The development of quantification theory. Godel's 
proof, "approaches to the justification of logic, and other advanced topics. 
Prerequisite: Philosophy 221 or completion of six hours in mathematics. 
Three periods a week. Second semester. Three credits. 

Philosophy 40S—Meta-ethics. 

A systematic and critical consideration of major ethical theories of the 
twentieth century. Readings include Moore, Ross, Stevenson, Ayer, Hare, 
Strawson, Nowell-Smith, and Sartre. Prerequisite: Philosophy 101, 102 or 
Philosophy 211. Three periods a week. Three credits. 

Philosophy 420— Contemporary Epistemology. 

An examination of contemporary approaches to and problems about the 
nature of knowlege. Topics will include perception, meaning, the analytic- 
synthetic distinction, ontological commitment, etc. Three periods a week. 
Three credits. 



Philosophy 421— Symbolism. 

A course dealing with the philosophic basis of symbol formation as a 
universal category. Origin, function and value of symbol and metaphor are 
traced in diverse cultures, from primitive to Oriental and Western, and as 
many fields as possible from meta-psychology, religious iconography, myth 
construction and art to the humanistic disciplines, literature and system 
building in metaphysics. Three periods a week. First semester. Three credits. 
(Offered in alternate years, offered 1970-71.) 



171 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Physics 



Philosophy 490— Readings in Philosophy. 

Open to all philosophy majors and otherwise qualified students of junior 
and senior status who desire to become more familiar with the philosophical 
literature in a field previously selected by the philosophy department after 
consultation with the students. The emphasis is upon intensive reading, with 
group discussion of the selections read. Three periods a week. Three credits. 

Philosophy 491, 492-Independent Study. 

Tutorial under the direction of a member of the staff. Three to six credits 
(by permission of the department). 

PHYSICS/ Assistant Professor Bulent I. Atalay, Chairman; 
Associate Professors Edson, Nikolic; Instructors Druzbick, Pitts. 



A major program in physics requires thirty-six semester hours of 
credit, of which thirty must be in physics, including Physics 
251-252, 391-392, and six must be in Mathematics 211-212. 



Physics 101- 102— General Physics (Non-Calculus) 

An introductory course in general physics stressing conceptual rather than 
mathematical aspects. Three single and one double period a week. Four 
credits each semester. 

Physics 151- 152— General Physics (Calculus). 

Corequisite: Math 211-212 or equivalent Three periods and one double 
period a week. Four credits each semester. 

Physics 153- 154— Physics Problems. 

Recitation section for 151-152. Oneperiod a week. One credit each semester. 

Physics 21 \-Modern Physics I: Atomic Physics. 

Foundations of quantum mechanics, atoms with one electron, multi- 
electron atoms, molecules, solids. First semester. Four credits. 

Physics 21 2— Modern Physics II: Nuclear Physics. 

Nuclear structure, static and dynamic properties; fundamental particles. 
Second semester. Four credits. 



172 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Physics 



Physics 251-Classical Mechanics I. 

Prerequisite: Physics 102 or 152 or equivalent; Math 212. Kinematics 
and dynamics of a mass particle, conservation laws, central forces, generalized 
coordinates, Lagrange and Hamiltonian methods, First semester. Three credits. 

Physics 252— Classical Mechanics II. 

Prerequisite: Physics 251 or equivalent. Kinematics and dynamics of a rigid 
body, Hamilton's equations of motion, small oscillations, special theory of 
relativity. Three periods a week. Second semester. 



Physics 391, 392— Electricity and Magnetism. 

Prerequisite: Math 212, Physics 152 or 252. A survey of the foundations 
of electromagnetic theory; including electrostatics, electromagnetic properties 
of matter, electric current analysis, electromagnetic induction, Maxwell's 
equations, special theory of relativity and elementary circuit theory (AC and 
DC). Emphasis will be on lectures and limited laboratory demonstrations. 
Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. 

Physics 393— Optics. 

Prerequisite: Math 212. An introduction to the theory of physical optics 
(Huygen's wave model of light) as applied to interference, diffraction, polariza- 
tion, phase and group velocity of light. Course includes both lectures and a 
laboratory based on the observation and interpretation of basic optical effects. 
Three periods and one lab per week. First semester. Three credits. 



Physics 394— Electronics. 

Prerequisite: Physics 391. An introduction to the theory and operation of 
electronic instruments and basic curcuits. The course will include a discussion 



of electrical measurements and measuring instruments, and basic circuit 
analysis (power supplies, amplifiers, oscillators, switching and timing circuits) 
using both vacuum tubes and transistors. Limited lectures with emphasis on 
laboratory work. Second semester. Three credits. 

Physics 401, 402— Methods of Theorectical Physics. 

Prerequisites: Math 212. Vectors and matrices, coordinates, functions of 
a complex variable, differential equations and application, Fourier and Laplace 
transformations, special functions in physics, finite and infinite dimensional 
vector spaces, variational methods, tensors, group theory. Three periods each 
week. Three credits each semester. 

Physics 451— Thermal Physics I: Thermodynamics. 

Prerequisite: Math 212. Temperature, thermodynamic states and variables, 
the laws of thermodynamics, entropy, thermodynamic potentials, change of 
phase. Three periods a week. Three credits. Mr. nikolic. 

Physics 452— Thermal Physics II: Statistical Mechanics. 

Prerequisites: Same prerequisites as Physics 451, and Physics 201. Ensembles, 
microcanonical, canonical, and grang'caononical distributions, Maxwell-Boltz- 
man, Bose-Einstein, and Fermi-Dirac distributions. Three periods a week. 
Three credits. 

Physics 471- 472— Quantum Mechanics. 

Prerequisites: Physics 252. The concepts and formulation of quantum 
physics. Quantum mechanics, the Hamiltonian operator, and Schrodinger's 
equation, the harmonic oscillator, matrix formulation of quantum mechanics, 
angular momentum, scattering theory, perterbation theory, multi-particle 
systems. Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. 

Physics 473— Solid State Physics. 

Crystal structure, diffraction, reciprocal lattice, elastic constants and elastic 
waves, phonons, thermal properties, Fermi gas model, energy bands, semi- 
conductor crystals, superconductivity. Three periods a week. First semester. 
Three credits. 

Physics 476— Nuclear Physics. 

Prerequisites: Physics 202. Corequisite: Physics 471-472. Mass, size, and 
constitution of nuclei, nuclear models, two-body forces, scattering reactions, 
introduction to elementary particles. Three periods each week. Second 
semester. Three credits. 

Physics 481, 482— Physics Seminar. 

Open to third and fourth year Physics students only. One period per week. 



173 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Physics 



Physics 491- 492- Independent Study. 
Open to Senior Physics Majors only. Three credits. 



174 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Psychology 



Physics 493- 494— Honors in Physics. 

Open to Senior Physics Majors, who have satisfied the required grade- 
point average. Four credits. 

PSYCHOLOGY/ Assistant Professor Roy B. Weinstock, Acting 
Chairman; Professor Dodd; Associate Professor M. A. Kelly; 
Assistant Professors Phifer, Chipman, Rabson,Garskof,Dobson, 
MacEwen. 

A major program in psychology requires thirty-six credits in 
psychology and related fields of study, and the taking of a com- 
prehensive examination in psychology in the student's senior year. 

Of the thirty-six required credits, twenty- four must be earned 
in courses in psychology other than Psychology 201-202. Statistics, 
History of Psychology, and one semester of Experimental Psy- 
chology are required courses for all major students who wish 
to receive a Bachelor of Arts degree. Those students electing a 
Bachelor of Science degree must meet the general requirements 
as stated on page 74: In addition, these students must take one 
year of Experimental Psychology and take their related fields in 
the natural sciences. Twelve hours from specific related fields of 
study or in advanced courses in psychology should be selected 
by the student in consultation with her departmental adviser. 

Psychology 201-202, General Psychology, is a prerequisite for 
all 300 level and 400 level courses. 

Psychology 201- 202— General Psychology. 

Fundamental principles of human behavior; biological antecedents; motiva- 
tion; perception; learning; individual differences; intelligence; and personality. 
Three periods a week. Six credits. Not open to freshmen. 

Psychology 261— Elementary Statistics. 

A consideration of basic statistical concepts such as central tendency, 
variability, and probability; a study of inferential techniques including cor- 
relation, regression, t-tests, analysis of variance, and chi-squ are. Three periods 
a week. Three credits. 

Psychology 301 — Social Psychology. 

The interrelationships between the individual and his social environment. 
Social influences upon motivation, perception, and behavior. The develop- 
ment of change of attitudes and opinions. Psychological analysis of small 
groups, social stratification, and mass phenomena. Three periods a week. 
Three credits. 



Psychology 311 — Abnormal Psychology. 

Abnormalities of sensation, perception, memory, thinking, emotion, in- 
telligence, motor activity, and personality; study of neurotic and psychotic 
syndromes. Three periods a week. Three credits each semester. 



Psychology 331— Developmental Psychology: The Infant and Child. 

The study of human development from conception through childhood. 
Emotional, intellectual, social, and physical growth will be examined. Special 
attention will be focused on current research and theories. Three periods 
a week. Three credits. 

Psychology 332- Developmental Psychology: The Adolescent and Adult. 

The study of human development from adolescence through old age. There 
will be special emphasis on adolescent changes in personality, intellectual 
capacities, physical characteristics, and life goals. Current research and theories 
on adolescence, adult behavior, and aging will be considered. Three periods 
a week. Three credits. 

Psychology 342— Psychology of Personality. 

A study of personality structure, dynamics, development, and methods 
of research. Three periods a week. Three credits. 

Psychology 345— Psychology of Learning. 

An analysis of the theoretical issues and/ or experimental bases of learning. 
Both human and infrahuman research will be considered. Three periods a 
week. Three credits. 



Psychology 362- Psychology of Exceptional Children. 

A study of exceptional children— the physically handicapped; the mentally 
retarded; the mentally gifted; and the emotional deviate. A survey of current 
attempts to provide programs to meet the specialized needs of such children. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. 

Psychology 371— Experimental Psychology: Operant Conditioning. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 261. An analysis of behavior utilizing the principles 
and procedures of operant conditioning. Laboratory work concentrated on the 
rat. Two lectures and one four-hour laboratory period a week. Four credits. 



775 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Psychology 



Psychology 372— Experimental Psychology: Sensation and Perception. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 261. Visual and auditory sensation will be examined 
using basic psychophysical methods. Fundamental perceptual phenomena will 
be analyzed. Scaling techniques will be presented. Three lectures and one 
two-hour laboratory period a week. Four credits. 

Psychology 373— Experimental Psychology: Human Learning. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 261. An examination of method, data, and theory 
in human learning and memory research. Three lectures and one two-hour 
laboratory period a week. Four credits. 



Psychology 401— Psychological Tests and Measurements. 

Prerequisite: Psychology 261. Theory of test construction; development, 
interpretation, and uses of tests of general and special abilities. Laboratory 
work illustrates the problems associated with testing and techniques of handling 
data. Three lectures and one two-hour laboratory period a week. Four credits. 



Psychology 421— History of Psychology. 
A survey of the historical antecedents of modern psychology, 
a week. Three credits. 



Three periods 



Psychology 432— Comparative Psychology. 

The study of the behavior of infrahuman organisms. Selected topics from 
both comparative psychology and ethology include tropisms, interactions of 
innate factors and learning, sensory capacities, and behavior morphology. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. 

Psychology 441, 442— Individual Research. 

The problems studied will be determined by individual interests. Each 
student will be responsible for library investigation and/or research. By 
permission of the instructor. Hours to be arranged. Three credits. 

Psychology 446— Physiological Psychology. 

A critical survey of the physiological correlates of behavior with special 
emphasis on neurophysiological mechanisms, psychopharmacology, neuroendo- 
crine functions, motivations, learning, and conditioning. Laboratory work 
stresses the methods of physiological investigation. Three lectures and one 
two-hour laboratory period a week. Four credits. 



176 

COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Psychology 



Psychology 451— Psychology of Motivation. 

The study of the origins and development of motivating forces and their 
effects on behavior. Theory and/or experimental data will be considered. 
Three periods a week. Three credits. 

Psychology 470, 471, 472, 473— Selected Topics in Psychology. 
A study of enduring and/or contemporary issues in psychology. Three 
periods a week. Three credits each semester. 



The Honors Program in Psychology 



A student may graduate with Honors in Psychology by meeting 
the following criteria: 

1. An overall gradepoint average of 3.0 and a gradepoint 
average of 3.3 in psychology must be attained at the end of seven 
semesters' work. 

2. The student must complete, with a minimum grade of B, 
Psychology 441 or 442 (Individual Research). This may be taken 
in the student's junior year if the instructor feels that the student 
is sufficiently prepared to execute adequately a research project. 

3. The student must be at or above the 90th percentile on the 
Department's comprehensive examination. 




RELIGION/ Associate Professor Elizabeth A. Clark, Chairman; 
Assistant Professor Cooper. 

A student majoring in religion must take at least 24 credits in 
religion courses (12 of which must be numbered 300 or higher) 
and 12 credits in related fields (all of which must be worked out 
in consultation with her adviser). A six credit seminar consisting 
of a year's work of readings and discussion culminating in the 
completion of a senior paper is required of all majors. 

At the beginning of the second semester of her senior year, 
a major is required to pass a written examination in the field of 
religion which she has prepared for through introductory course 
work and private study. A make-up examination is offered when 
necessary. 

A distinguished performance on the written examination and 
senior paper, in addition to a high grade average in religion 
course work, entitles a major to be graduated with Honors in 
Religion. 



177 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Religion 



Religion 101— Biblical Literature: The Hebrew Bible. 
A study of the history, literature and religion of ancient Israel. First 
semester. Three credits. 



Religion 102— Biblical Literature: The New Testament. 
A critical study of the origins and theological motifs of New Testament 
literature. Second semester. Three credits. 



Religion 201, 202 + - The Western Religious Heritage. 

An examination of the historical and theological development of Judaism 
and of Christianity (primitive, Roman Catholic and Protestant). Three periods 1 
a week. Three credits each semester. 

Religion 213, 214 + — Modern Religious Thinking. 

A study of the problems that modernity poses for religious thought and 
faith. The first semester deals with the question and meaning of God, and the 
interpretation of man. The second semester deals with the problem of historical 
relativity, the meaning of a christology, and the character of a Christian 
ethic. The accent throughout is on contemporaneity. Three credits each 
semester. 

Religion 239— Social Change and the Religious Perspective. 

A study of some of the major social problems that confront contemporary 
American life as seen from the perspective of a modern Christian faith. 
Readings in literature from the social sciences and theology. Three credits. 

Religion 301— Readings in Hellenistic Religions. 

A study of the types of religious belief, including primitive Christianity, 
which emerge in the Hellenistic era. The accent throughout is on con- 
temporary parallels. First semester. Three credits. 



178 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Religion 



Religion 306- Early Christian Thought. 

Studies of the theology of the early church with special attention given 
to the development of Trinitarian and Christological thought. Second 
semester. Three credits. 

Religion 311-Concepts of God. 

A critical analysis of traditional and contemporary conceptions of deity 
and an exploration of the meaning of God in relation to man's understand- 
ing of himself and his culture. Three credits. 



Religion 331— Studies in Historical Theology. 

The intensive study of a particular problem, theologian, or historical 
era. 1969-70: Nineteenth Century Studies. Three credits. 

Religion 333- The Shorter Writings of Whitehead. 

Readings and discussions of such works as Science and the Modern World, 
Religion in the Making, Adventures of Ideas. Emphasis will be placed on 
Whitehead's epistemological and religious ideas. Limited to students who have 
achieved some facility with religious or philosophical concepts. Three credits. 



Religion 366— Theological Ethics. 

An attempt to discover the aspects that constitute moral selfhood. Readings 
in such thinkers as Royce, Buber, Niebuhr, Williams, Tillich and others. 
Three credits. 



Religion 401- 402— Senior Seminar. 

The first semester's study involves all senior majors and staff in readings 
and discussion. The second semester of the seminar will be devoted to the 
preparation of a senior paper under the guidance of a department member. 
Students other than senior majors who have sufficient course work in Religion 
may register with permission of the department. Six credits for the year. 

Religion 491, 492, 493, 494- Independent Study. 

Individual work under the guidance of a member of the department. 
Three credits a semester. By permission of the department. 



SOCIOLOGY / Pro] "essor Philip J. Allen, Chairman; Professors 
L. C. Carter, Sletten; Assistant Professor Jessen; Instructor 
Jones. 

The major program in sociology requires thirty-six credits 
in sociology and related social sciences. Twenty-four of these 
required credits must be earned in sociology courses other than 
Sociology 201-202. The twelve additional credit hours in related 
fields may be selected from other social sciences in consultation 
with the departmental adviser. 

Sociology 201- Principles of Sociology. 

A study of the basic characteristics of group life; status, role, society, 
and culture; interaction between persons and groups. Three periods a week 
for the first semester. Three credits. 

Sociology 202— Social Problems. 

Social change; deviance; social and personal disorganization; mobility; 
delinquency, crime; political, industrial and other group conflicts. Three 
periods a week for the second semester. Three credits. 

Sociology 301- 302— Introduction to Anthropology. 

First semester foci: history of anthropology, physical anthropology, and 
archaeology. Second semester foci: ethnology, ethnography, linguistics, and 
primitive art. Three periods a week. Six credits. 

Sociology 303- Culture and Personality. 

Prerequisite: six hours of sociology. Impact of culture and social structure 
upon the individual, and particularly of sociocultural norms and values 
upon personal attitudes and behavior, with some focus upon behavior dis- 
orders. Three periods a week for the first semester. Three credits. 



179 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Sociology 



Sociology 311— Population. 

Prerequisite: six hours of sociology. Analysis of historical and contemporary 
population composition and change, and how demographic structure is related 



to economic, political, religious and kinship structures. Three periods a week 
for first semester. Three credits. 

Sociology 312- Migration. 

Prerequisite: six hours of sociology. Analysis of population movements, 
their causes, and effects. Foci: 19th and 20th century migrations and how 
these are related to contemporary economic and industrial development. 
Three periods a week for the second semester. Three credits. 

Sociology 313— Urban Society. 

Origin, character and significance of urban and metropolitan communities. 
Common problems of city living; ecological factors in growth of cities and 
their influence upon social behavior. Three periods a week for the second 
semester. Three credits. 

Sociology 314— Population Trends. 
World population trends, with special emphasis upon developing nations. 
Areas for intensive treatment: the "population explosion," its causes and 
consequences. Impact of population changes on world events. Three periods 
a week for the first semester. Three credits. 



180 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Sociology 



Sociology 331— The Family. 

Prerequisite: six hours of sociology or psychology. A historical, social- 
psychological and cultural study of sex behavior, mate selection, courtship, 
marriage and family relations. Three periods a week for the first semester. 
Three credits. 

Sociology 332- 333— Social Welfare Work. 

First semester foci: historical backgrounds, philosophies, values, goals, and 
issues of human welfare concerns; social welfare as a social institution. 
Second semester foci: social work as a profession; fields, methods, policies, 
and consequences of social action or inaction. Three periods a week. Three 
credits per semester. 



Sociology 341 — American Society. 

Analysis of major value patterns and institutions of American society and 
their interrelations, as well as of kinship, occupation, and authority systems. 
Three periods a week for the second semester. Three credits. (Offered in 
alternate years, offered in 1970-71.) 

Sociology Ml— Occupations and Social Structure. 

Analysis of major occupational roles; of relationships between occupation 
and kinship organization, as well as of social stratification, social philosophies, 
and political action. Three periods a week for the second semester. Three 
credits. (Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 1970-71.) 



Sociology 351— Juvenile Delinquency. 

Prerequisite: six hours of sociology or psychology. A sociological analysis 
of the natifre, extent, causes, impact and treatment of juvenile delinquency. 
Three periods a week for the first semester. Three credits. (Offered in alternate 
years. Offered in 1970-71.) 



Sociology 352— Criminology. 

Prerequisite: six hours of sociology or psychology. Delinquency and crime; 
nature and extent; causal theories; impact; present trends and programs of 
treatment. Three periods a week for the second semester. Three credits. 

Sociology 353— Social Control. 

Prerequisite: six hours of sociology or psychology. An analysis of social 
institutional norms; how they regulate and control individual behavior, in- 
ducing compliance with authority. Three periods a week for the first semester. 
Three credits. (Offered in alternate years. Not offered in 1970-71.) 

Sociology 362— Methods of Social Research. 

Prerequisite: six hours of sociology. Methods of investigating selected prob- 
lems of current importance with emphasis upon individual work. Three 
periods a week for the first semester. Three credits. 

Sociology 402— Sociology of Child Development. 

Prerequisite: six hours of sociology or psychology. The emergence of 
personality with the child's socially defined roles in primary groups; social 
formation of attitudes through interaction with siblings, parents and peers. 
Three periods a week for the second semester. Three credits. 



Sociology 421- Human Relations. 

Racial and ethnic groups in America; minority-group consciousness; marginal 
persons and groups; inter-group tension, conflict, accommodation and co- 
operation. Three periods a week for the second semester. Three credits. 

Sociology 422— Sociology of Religion. 

Prerequisite: Sociology 201. A study of social factors in the origin, develop- 
ment and function of religious institutions, with emphasis upon the basic 
principles of Judeo-Christian tradition. Three periods a week for the first 
semester. Three credits. 



181 



COURSE 
OFFERINGS 

Sociology 



Sociology 432— Sociology of Leadership. 

Prerequisite: six hours of sociology or psychology. Causes and consequences 
of social stratification and social mobility; impact of culture, social structure 
and social interaction upon occupational achievement, personal creativity, 
inventiveness and leadership. Three periods a week for the second semester. 
Three credits. (Offered in alternate years. Offered in 1970-71.) 

Sociology 481— History of Social Theory. 

Prerequisite: six hours of sociology. A study of theories in the historical 
development of sociology. Three periods a week for the first semester. Three 
credits. 



Sociology 482- Contemporary Sociological Theory. 
Prerequisite: six hours of sociology. An analysis of current sociological 
theory. Three periods a week for the second semester. Three credits. 



Sociology 489, 490— Individual Study and Research. 

Not a regularly given course, but available to qualified students with the 
agreement of members of the department. Reading and research with a pro- 
ject or paper, under the guidance of a member of the department. Offered 
as required either semester. Three credits. 

Sociology 491— General Readings. 

Prerequisite: six hours of sociology. Selected works ranging over the 
"sociological classics." Three credits. 

Sociology 492— Special Readings. 

Prerequisite: six hours of sociology plus Sociology 491. Selected readings 
from various specialized areas: cultural anthropology, marriage and the family, 
social welfare, delinquency and crime, population, minority groups, social 
organization, social theory, and the sociology of religion. Three credits. 



Concentration in Social Welfare for Sociology Majors: 



182 

COURSE 

OFFERINGS 

Sociology 



Students electing a concentration in social welfare within their 
sociology major are provided supervised field placement in a social 
welfare agency, during one of the regular semesters, or during the 
summer. This may be concurrent with enrollment in Sociology 
332-333 (Social Welfare Work), or as part of required work in 
Sociology 489, 490 (Independent Study). 

Concentration in social welfare includes: (1) all the above- 
indicated requirements for sociology majors; (2) Sociology 332-333; 
(3) at least three courses selected from Sociology 3 1 1 , 313, 331, 
342, 352, 402, and 421; and (4) at least 120 hours of field ex- 
perience. This program meets the requirements of the Council 
on Social Work Education of which the Sociology Department has 
been a constituent member since the 1950' s. 




The Corporation of the University 

Legal Title 

"The Rector and Visitors of the University of Virginia" 
The Rector of the University 

Joseph H. McConnell 
The Visitors of the University 



184 



DIRECTORY 



C. Waller Barrett Charlottesville 

Emma Ziegler Brown Richmond 

Richard S. Cross Lafayette Hill, Pennsylvania 

J. Hartwell Harrison Boston 

W. Wright Harrison Virginia Beach 

Edwin L. Kendig, Jr Richmond 

J. Sloan Kuykendall Winchester 

Lawrence Lewis, Jr Richmond 

Joseph H. McConnell Richmond 

Edwin K. Mattern Roanoke 

Molly Vaughan Parrish Newport News 

Brownie E. Polly, Jr Big Stone Gap 

William S. Potter Wilmington, Delaware 

Donald E. Santarelli Alexandria 

C Stuart Wheatley, Jr Danville 

J. Harvie Wilkinson, III Richmond 

Raymond C. Bice The Secretary of the Visitors 





DIRECTORY 



Administration 

Edgar Finley Shannon, Jr., A.B., A.M., D.Phil. (Oxon), 
Litt.D., LL.D., D.Hum President of the University 

Office of the Chancellor 

Grellet Collins Simpson, B.A., M.A. Ph.D., LL.D 

Chancellor of Mary Washington College 

Michael Houston, B.A., M.A Assistant to the Chancellor 

Mervin A. Frantz, B. S Director of Personnel 

Thomas P. Mann, B.A Director of Information Services 

J.M. H. Willis,Jr.,B.A.,LL.B Legal 

Adviser of the College 

Anne A. Moyse Secretary to the Chancellor 

Lucretia Oesterheld Secretary to the 185 

Assistant to the Chancellor 

Sybil A. McCrory Secretary to the Director of 

Information Services 

Mary D. Shover Secretary to the Director 

of Personnel 
Office of the Dean 

Reginald W. Whidden, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. Dean of the College 

James H. Croushore, A.B., A.M., Ph.D Associate Dean 

of the College 
Jane N. Saladin, B.M.E. , M.M Registrar and 

Director of Financial Aid 
Helen H. Thomas Administrative Assistant to the 

Director of Financial Aid 

Laura Voelkel Sumner, A.B., M.A., Ph.D Director of 

the Summer Session 

Eloise Johnson Browning Secretary to the Dean 

Martha Lukes Harding Secretary to the Associate Dean 

Bonnie Clore Secretary, Office of the Dean 

Audrey Smith Hurlock Recorder, Secretary to the Registrar 

Jane Hubler Marra, B.S Secretary, Office of the Registrar 

Nancy Carter Clerk, Office of the Registrar 



Office of the Dean of Students 

Mildred A. Droste, B.S., M.Ed Dean of Students 

Claire Talley Booker Secretary to the Dean of Students 

Mildred C. Gilman Secretary 

Office of the Comptroller 

Edgar E. Woodward, B.S Comptroller 

Edward V. Allison, Jr., B.S Business Manager 

Claude T. Parcell, Jr., B.S Administrative Assistant for 

Fiscal and Maintenance Planning 

Gloria S. Day Secretary to the Comptroller 

Kay B. Brown Secretary to the Business Manager 

Office of the Director of Student Affairs 

Emily A. Holloway, B.S. Director of Student Affairs 

Franklin Hagy Executive Housekeeper 

Ruth C. Willetts Secretary to the Director of 

j^ Student Affairs 
Sandra T. Elkins Secretary 



DIRECTORY Phyllis G. Lipman Housekeeping Supervisor, Residence Halls 

Office of the Director of Admissions 

Albert Ray Merchent, B.A., M.Ed., D.Ed Director of 

Admissions 

Joanne C. Close, B.A Admissions Counselor 

Hilda R. Sagun Secretary to the Director of Admissions 

Katherine L. Blake Records Clerk 

Betty Luttrell Secretary 

Dorothy Roberson Clerk 

Counseling Center 

Mary A. K. Kelly B.A., M.A Director 

Sharon W. Lancaster Administrative Assistant 



187 



Library 

Daniel Holt Woodward, B.A., M.A. Ph.D., M.S. in L.S. 

Librarian 

B.A., M.A., University of Coloradio; Ph.D., Yale University; M.S. in 

L.S., Catholic University of America. 

Barbara Alden, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. Archivist 

B.A., M.A., Wellesley College; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Marian Reed Watts, A.B., B.S. in L.S Head Cataloguer 

A.B., Goucher College; B.S. in L.S., Drexel Institute of Technology. 

Charles David Balthis, B.A., MS. in L.S Assistant 

Cataloguer 
B.A., Randolph-Macon College; M.S. in L. S., Catholic University 
of America. 

Renna Hardy Cosner, A.B., A.M. in L.S. .Circulation Librarian 
A.B., Randolph-Macon Woman's College; A.M. in L.S., University of 
Michigan. 

Diane D. Fishman, B.A., M.S. in L.S Acquisitions Librarian 

B.A., Cornell University; M.S. in L.S., University of Illinois. 

Janie Morgan Kash, B.A Library Assistant-Serials 

B.A., Randolph-Macon Woman's College DIRECTORY 

Taketo Ohtani, A. A., B.A., M.A Library Assistant 

A. A., Hiwassee College; B.A., M.A., Scarritt College. 

Reed Kilduff Simmons, B.A Library Assistant-Circulation 

B.A., Mary Washington College. 

Dorothy A. D. Barrett Catalogue Clerk 

Marian Stevens Holt Administrative Aide 

Mildred Brooks Ray Catalogue Typist 

Margaret Jones Smith Circulation Clerk 

Alumnae Association 

Ann Louise Perinchief, B.A Director of Alumnae Affairs 

Joy S. Toombs Secretary 

Carolyn M. Whitaker Clerk 

Health Services 

Clement Jay Robbins, III, B.S., M.D College Physician 

B.S., Hampden-Sydney College; M.D., Medical College of Virginia. 

Louis B. Massad, B.S., M.D Associate Physician 

B.S., Virginia Military Institute; M.D., Medical College of Virginia. 



188 



DIRECTORY 



HI- - --- +wm 



Lawrence Moter , M.D Associate Physician 

M.D., Medical College of Virginia. 

David B. Rice, B.A., M.D Associate Physician 

B.A., M.D., University of Virginia. 

Inez Frye Watson, R.N Head Nurse 

R.N., Broadlawns Hospitals, Des Moines, Iowa. 

Virginia H. Cullen, R.N Nurse 

R.N., Syracuse Memorial School of Nursing. 

Bessie Thomas Olive, R.N Nurse 

R. N., Mary Washington Hospital Training School. 

Dorothy T. Shannon, R.N Nurse 

R.N., Sarah Leigh Hospital, Norfolk. 

Charlotte Harris White, R.N Nurse 

R.N., Johnston- Willis Hospital, Richmond. 

Pearline Soltes, R.N Relief Nurse 

R.N., Mary Washington Hospital Training School. 

Merton Nugent , R.N Relief Nurse 

R.N., Petersburg Hospital School of Nursing. 

Eleanor M. Pettit , R.N. Relief Nurse 

R.N., Lankaneau Hospital School of Nursing, Philadelphia. 



Administrative and Personnel Services 

Doris V. Bourne Chief Operator, Switchboard 

Bobby W. Carter Supervisor, Tabulating Office 

Jessie F. Colvin Operator, Switchboard 

Janet J. DeShazo Payroll Supervisor 

June M. Ellis Night Operator, Switchboard 

Lois Jacobs Embrey Bookkeeper 

Barbara Y. Ferrara Disbursing Clerk 

Josephine S. Henshaw Payroll Clerk 

Rosser C. Howard Duplicating Services Supervisor 

Fern Jones Operator, Switchboard 



Linda M. Martin Mail Services Supervisor 

Frances S. Melle Cashier 

Jane R. Shelton Disbursing Clerk 

Carolyn Thomas Tabulating Clerk 

Bookstore 

Charles L. Read Manager 

Judith Tollett Secretary 

Lucille H. Dent Clerk 

Eve lyn Holm e s Clerk 

Velma Meads Clerk 

Luci lle O' Bi er . . , Clerk 

Buildings and Grounds 

Vincent H. Willetts Superintendent 

Robert E. Revell Supervisor 

Juanita S. Newton Secretary to the Superintendent 

Food Services 

Pal Robison Food Service Director 

Whiting B. Lee Assistant to the Director 

Mildred J. McGinniss Assistant to the Director 

David H. Stack Assistant to the Director 

Cecelia Emma Baker Secretary to the Director 

Nunra Ferrara Dietary Unit Supervisor 

Selma Shelton Manager, College Shop 

Maud H. Conway Hostess, Dining Hall 

Annie S. Gallant Hostess, Dining Hall 

Mary W. Jones Hostess, Dining Hall 

Ina Pitts Hostess, Dining Hall 

Joy G. Rankins Hostess, Dining Hall 




189 



DIRECTORY 




190 



DIRECTORY 



Placement Bureau 

A. Isabel Gordon Director of the Placement Bureau 

Mary D. Ross Secretary 

Donna M. Davis Clerk 

Security 

Medford D. Haynes Chief, Campus Police 

Charles W. Jones Deputy Chief, Campus Police 

Daniel W. Bishop Campus Policeman 

William A. Chewning Campus Policeman 

Harold B. English Campus Policeman 

James E. Patton Campus Policeman 

Edward G. Ramsey Campus Policeman 

Howard R. Rose Campus Policeman 

William R. Viar Campus Policeman 

Residence Halls 

Nancy G. Buchanan Senior Assistant, Bushnell Hall 

Margaret G. Chase Complex Director, Tri- Unit- 
Westmoreland Hall 

Edith C. Clark Administrative Aide, Marye Hall 

Virginia E. Conklin Complex Director, Randolph Hall- 
Mason Hall 

Susie G. Embrey Complex Director; Betty Lewis Hall, 

Brent Hall, Framar, Marye Hall, 
Trench Hill 

Virginia Gallamore Residence Director, Willard Hall 

Marion E. George Residence Director, Virginia Hall 

Nellie F. Henry Complex Director, Jefferson 

Hall-Bushnell Hall 

Brenda C. Jennings Senior Assistant, Westmoreland Hall 

Lucy Mancuso Senior Assistant, Randolph Hall 

Barbara Ann Mingee Administrative Aide, Framar 

Helen H. Prasse Complex Director, Marshall 

Hall-Russell Hall 

Aileen M. Reynolds Administrative Aide, Trench Hill 

Dianne Taylor Senior Assistant, Russell Hall 

Virginia G. Wood Administrative Aide, Brent Hall 



Faculty 

Vladimir V. Brenner 

Professor Emeritus of Modern Foreign Languages 

State Gymnasium of Moscow; Officer of Academic Degree, Military 
Academy, Tver, Russia. 

Louis J. Cabrera, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor Emeritus of Modern Foreign Languages 
A.B., University of Dubuque; M. A., University of Maine; Doctor of Letters 
and Philosophy, University of Madrid. 

William A. Castle, B.S., Ph.D. 
Professor Emeritus of Biology 

B.S., Denison University; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Oscar Haddon Darter, A.B., A.M., Ed.D. 

Professor Emeritus of History 
A.B., State Teachers College, Ada, Oklahoma; A.M., Columbia Uni- 
versity; Ed.D., George Washington University. 

E. Boyd Graves, A.B., A.M., Ed.D. 

Professor Emeritus of Philosophy 

A.B., A.M., College of William and Mary; Ed.D., George Washington 

University. 191 



Milton H. Stansbury, A.B., Ph.D. DIRECTORY 

Professor Emeritus of Modern Foreign Languages 

A.B., Brown University; Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania. 
Dorothy Duggan Van Winckel, B.S., M.A. 
Professor Emeritus of Art 

B.S., University of Tennessee; M.A. in Fine Arts, Peabody College; 

Student, Art Students' League, New York City, and Pennsylvania Academy 

of Fine Arts. 

********** 

Professors 

Philip James Allen, A.B., M.A., B.D., Ph.D. 
Professor of Sociology 

A.B., Ohio Northern University; M.A., Northwestern University; B.D., 

Garret Theological Seminary; Ph.D., American University. 

Edward Alvey, Jr., B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of Education 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia. 
Guenndolyn A. Beeler, A. A., B.S., M.A. 
Professor of Home Economics 

A. A., Kansas City Junior College; B.S., Kansas State College; M.A., 

Columbia University. 

Rachel Jane Benton, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 
B.A., De Pauw University; M.A., Ph.D., State University of Iowa. 




JULIEN BlNFORD 

Professor of Art 

Graduate, Art Institute of Chicago., Ryerson Fellowship for study in 
France, Virginia Museum Senior Fellowship, Rosenwald Fellowship. Repre- 
sented in permanent collections of Boston Museum of Fine Arts, Uni- 
versity of Georgia, University of Nebraska, Art Institute of Chicago, 
Museum of the State of Washington, Virginia Museum of Fine Arts, 
Springfield Museum, New Britain Museum, Oberlin College, and others. 

Samuel O. Bird, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 

Professor of Geology 
B.S., Marshall College; M.S., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., University 
of North Carolina. 

Zoe Wells Carroll Black, B.A., A.M., Ph.D. 

Professor of Biology 
B.A., University of Tennessee; A.M., Ph.D., Duke University. 

Mildred McMurtry Bolling, A.B., A.M. 
Professor of Modern Foreign Languages 

A.B., Colorado College; A.M., University of Missouri; diploma, Institut 

de Phonetique, University of Paris. 

Stanley F. Bulley, Mus. Bac, Mus. Doc. 
Professor of Music 
L.R.A.M., Royal Academy of Music, London; A.R.C.O., Royal College 

1*2 of Music, London; Royal School of Church Music, London; Mus. Bac, 

Mus. Doc, University of Toronto. 

Hobart C. Carter, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Central Missouri State College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Missouri. 

Luther Clyde Carter, Jr., B.A., B.D., Ph.D. 
Professor of Sociology 

B.A., Carson-Newman College; B.D., Union Theological Seminary; Ph.D. 

Yale University. 

Herbert Lee Cover, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 

Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D., University of Virginia. 
James Henry Croushore, A.B., A.M., Ph.D. 
Professor of English 

A.B., A.M., Lehigh University; Ph.D., Yale University. 

Eileen Kramer Dodd, Ph.B., M. A., Ph.D. 
Professor of Psychology 

Ph.B., Muhlenberg College; M.A., Ph.D., New York University. 

Benjamin W. Early, B.A., M. A., Ph.D. 

Professor of English 

B.A., M.A., University of Virginia; Ph.D., Duke University. 



DIRECTORY 



Samuel Thomas Emory, Jr., A.B., M. A., Ph.D. 
Professor of Geography 

A.B., M.A., University of North Carolina; Ph.D., University of Maryland. 
LewisPerley Fickett, Jr., A.B., L.L.B., M.P.A.,Ph.D. 
Professor of Political Science 

A.B., Bowdoin College; L.L.B., M.P.A., Ph.D., Harvard University 

Marion A. Greene, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of Modern Foreign Languages 

A.B., Tufts College; M.A., Radcliffe College; Ph.D., University of North 

Carolina. 

William Wayne Griffith, A.B., M.A., B.S. in L.S., Ph.D. 
Professor of English 

A.B., University of Pennsylvania; M.A., Harvard University; B.S. in L.S., 

Drexel Institute; Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh. 

Henry Weldon Hewetson, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of Economics 

B.A., University of Toronto; M.A., University of British Columbia; 

Ph.D., University of Chicago. 
Miriam Bowes Hoge, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of Modern Foreign Languages 

A.B., Randolph-Macon Woman's College; M.A., Ph.D., University of 

Pennsylvania. 193 



Anna Scott Hoye, A.B., M.S., Ph.D. DTRFPTOR V 

Professor of Biology 

A. B., Lynchburg College; M.S., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

Earl G. Insley, B.S., Ph.D. 
Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. 

Edwin Harvie Jones, B.A. , M.A. , Ph.D. 

Professor of Modern Foreign Languages 

B.A., Hampden-Sydney College; Diplome Superieur d' Etudes Francaises, 
University of Nancy, France; M.A., Duke University; Ph.D., University 
of Virginia. 

Walter Butler Kelly, B.S., M. A., Ph.D. 

Professor of English 

B.S., Ursinus College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 
Pauline Grace King, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of Art 

B.S., Mary Washington College; Art Institute of Chicago; M.A. , George 

Peabody College; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

Albert R. Klein, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of Dramatic Arts and Speech 

B.A., State University of Iowa; M.A., University of North Carolina; 

Ph.D., University of Denver. 




194 



DIRECTORY 



Kurt F. Leidecker, B.A., A.M., Ph.D. 
Professor of Philosophy 

B.A., A.M.; Oberlin College; Ph.D., University of Chicago. 
Almont Lindsey, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of History 

B.S., Knox College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
George E. Luntz, B.M., M.M., Ph.D. 
Professor of Music 

B.M., M.M., Dana School of Music; Graduate, Master Class, Vienna 

Conservatory; Ph.D., State University of Iowa. 

Clifton B. McIntosh, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of Modern Foreign Languages 
A.B., Duke University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

Sidney H. Mitchell, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of English 

A.B., Swarthmore College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

William C. Pinschmidt, Jr. , B.S. , M.S. , Ph.D. 
Professor of Biology 

B.S., Mount Union College; M.S., Ohio State University; Ph.D., Duke 

University. 

Claudia Moore Read, B.S., M.A. 

Professor of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 

B.S., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina; M.A., 
New York University. Special Study, Wigman School, Berlin, Germany, 
Humphrey-Weidman Studio, and Bennington School of Dance. 

Carmen Lucila Rivera, B.A. , M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of Modern Foreign Languages 

B.A., University of Puerto Rico; M.A. , Florida State College for Women; 

Ph.D., University of Salamanca. 

Robert Harrison Shaw, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Carroll College; M.A., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D. George 

Washington University. 

Grellet Collins Simpson, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., LL.D. 
Professor of English 

B.A., Randolph-Macon College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia; 

LL.D., Randolph-Macon College. 
Charles Alfred Sletten, B.A., A.M., Ph.D. 
Professor of Sociology 

B.A., University of Virginia; A.M., Ph.D., Harvard University. 
Mary Ellen Stephenson, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of Modern Foreign Languages 

B.A., Westhampton College; M.A., Middlebury College; Ph.D., University 

of Chicago. 



Laura Voelkel Sumner, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of Classics 

A.B., Vassar College; M.A., Ph.D., Johns Hopkins University. 

Raiford E. Sumner, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Professor of Political Science 

B.A., University of Tennessee; M.A., University of Mississippi; Ph.D., 
Louisiana State University. 

Joseph Carroll Vance, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of History 

B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia. 
George M. Van Sant, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of Philosophy 

A.B., St. John's College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

Reginald Wilbur Whidden, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
Professor of English 

B.A., M.A., McMaster University; Ph.D., Yale University. 

Lawrence Arndt Wishner, B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 
Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., M.S., Ph.D. University of Maryland. 

Daniel Holt Woodward, B.A., M.A., Ph.D., M.S. in L.S. 
Professor of English 

B.A., M.A., University of Colorado; Ph.D., Yale University; M.S. in L.S., 

Catholic University of America. 



195 



DIRECTORY 



Associate Professors 

Zoltan A. Antony, Th.D. 

Associate Professor of Modern Foreign Languages 

University of Bratislava, University of Leipzig; Th.D., University of 

Erlangen. 

Margery E. Arnold, B.S., M.A. 

Associate Professor of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 
B.S., Russell Sage College; M.A., Columbia University. 

Juliette Breffort Blessing 

Associate Professor of Modern Foreign Languages 

Licence-es-Lettres, University of Lille; Diplome d'Ecole des Sciences 
Politiques, University of Paris; Diplome d'Etudes Superieures, University 
of Paris. 

Marshall E. Bowen, B.Ed., M.A. , Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Geography 

B.Ed., Plymouth Teachers College; M.A., Kent State University; Ph.D., 
Boston University. 

Joseph Bozicevic, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Modern Foreign Languages 

B.S., Juniata College; M.A., Middlebury College; Ph.D., Georgetown 

University. 




Nathaniel Hapgood Brown, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of English 

A.B., Princeton University; M.A., Syracuse University; Ph.D., Columbia 

University. 

Marion K. Chauncey, B.M., M.A. 

Associate Prof essor of Music 

Graduate, Georgia State Woman's College; B.M. and Violin Diploma, 
Ithaca Conservatory of Music; Student of Cesar Thompson— Belgian 
virtuoso, W. Grant Egbert, and Jean Pulikowski of the Cincinnati Con- 
servatory; M.A., Columbia University. 

Elizabeth A. Clark, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Religion 

A.B., Vassar College; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University. 

Mildred Anne Droste, B.S., M.Ed. 

Associate Professor of Health, Physical Education and Recreation 
B.S., Longwood College; M.Ed., Woman's College of the University of 
North Carolina. 

Albert G. Duke, A.B., M.A. 

Associate Professor of Dramatic Arts and Speech 
A.B., M.A., Syracuse University. 

Jean Slater Edson, A.B., M.A. 
196 Associate Professor of Music and Physics 

A.B., Vassar College; M.A., Columbia University. Study under Karl 

DIRECTORY Walter, Vienna; Werner Dommes, Munich; Jean Langlais, Paris; A. A.G.O.- 

CH.M., American Guild of Organists. 

Dana G. Finnegan, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of English 

B.S., Columbia University; M.A., Stanford University; Ph.D., University of 

Missouri. 

Delmont F. Fleming, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of English 

B.A., Eastern Baptist College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

Donald Ellsworth Glover, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of English 

B.A., College of William and Mary; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia. 
Miriam Jean Greenberg, B.S., M.Ed. 
Associate Professor of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 

B.S., M.Ed., University of Maryland. 

Anne F. Hamer, B.Mus., M.Mus. 

Associate Professor of Music 

B.Mus. University of Michigan; M.Mus., Catholic University, Piano 
study under McClanahan, New York City, and Joseph Brinkman, Ann 
Arbor, Michigan. Cello study with Hans Pick, Ann Arbor, Howard 
Mitchell, Washington, D.C., and Joseph Schuster, New York City. 



Anna Mae Harris, B.A., M.A. 
Associate Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., Mary Washington College; M.A., University of Virginia. 
Rosemary H. Herman, A.B., M.A. 

Associate Professor of Modern Foreign Languages 

A.B., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina; M.A., 
University of North Carolina. 

Margaret Meader Hofmann, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of Modern Foreign Languages 

A.B., Wellesley College; M.A., University of New Hampshire; Ph.D. 

University of Kansas. 

Levin Houston, III, B.A. 
Associate Professor of Music 

B.A., Virginia Military Institute; Pupil of Ray Lev, Thorvald Otterstrom, 

Hans Barth, Guy Maier, Quincy Cole, and Harold Genther; Composition 

at the Music Institute under Roger Sessions and Ernest Krenek. 

Michael Houston, B.A., M.A. 
Associate Professor of History 

B.A., Randolph-Macon College; M.A., American University. 
Rose Mary Johnson, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of Biology 

A.B., Hood College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia. JQJ 

Thomas Lee Johnson, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Biology Dl KUC 1 U K Y 

B.A., Lynchburg College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

Mary Annette Klinesmith Kelly, B.A., M.A. 
Associate Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Mary Washington College; M.A., Ohio State University; Fulbright 

Scholar, University of London Institute of Psychiatry. 

♦Bernard C. Lemoine, B.M., M.M. 
Associate Professor of Music 

B.M., Oberlin Conservatory of Music; M.M., University of Illinois School 

of Music. 
Bernard L. Mahoney, Jr., B.S., M.S., Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of Chemistry 

B.S., M.S., Boston College; Ph.D., University of New Hampshire. 

Albert Ray Merchent, B.A., M.Ed., D.Ed. 
Associate Professor of Education 

B.A., Emory and Henry College; M.Ed., D.Ed., University of Virginia. 

Fred Earle Miller, A.B., M.A. 
Associate Professor of Economics 

A.B., M.A., Colorado State College of Education. 

Nancy Heyroth Mitchell, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of English 

A.B., Swarthmore College; M.A., Yale University; Ph.D., Catholic Uni- 
versity of America. 

*On leave 1969-70 




198 



DIRECTORY 



Paul C. Muick, B.F.A., A.M., Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of Art 

B.F.A., Ohio State University; A.M., University of Chicago; Ph.D., 

Ohio State University. 

Nikola Milana Nikolic, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of Physics 

B.S., Belgrade University; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University. 
Cornelia Davidson Oliver, B. A. , A.M. 
Associate Professor of Art 

B.A., Smith College; A.M., Duke University. 

Mary Jo Parrish, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of Biology 

B.A., M.A., University of North Carolina; Ph.D., University of Virginia. 
Galo Rene Perez, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of Modern Foreign Languages 

B.A., Mejia National College; M.A., Ph.D., Central University of Ecuador. 

Paul C. Slayton, Jr., B.S., M.Ed., D.Ed. 

Associate Professor of Education 

B.S., M.Ed., D.Ed., University of Virginia. 
Glen Ray Thomas, B.A. , M.A. , Ph.D. 

Associate Professor of Psychology 

B.A., Stanford University; M.A., American University; Ph.D., Emory 
University. 

Rebecca T. Woosley, A.B., B.S., M.S. 

Associate Professor of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 
A.B., Woman's College of the University of North Carolina; B.S., Mary 
Washington College; M.S., Louisiana State University. 

Benjamin F. Zimdars, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
Associate Professor of History 

B.A., North Central College; M.A., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., 

University of Texas. 



********** 



Assistant Professors 

Bulent I. Atalay, B.S., M.S. 
Assistant Professor of Physics 

B.S.,M.S., Georgetown University. 
James E. Baker, B.S., M.Ed. 
Assistant Professor of Music 

B.S., M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University. 

Janet F. Bonyhard, B.A., M.A. 
Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

B. A., Leeds University; M.A., Bedford College, University of London. 



Roger J. Bourdon, B.S., M.A., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of History 

B.S., Loyola University, M.A.; University of California at Los Angeles; 
Ph.D., University of Los Angeles. 

Harry L. Chipman, Jr., B.S., M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 
B.S., M.S., Purdue University. 

Juanita H. Clement, B.S., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 
B.S., Radford College; M.A., George Peabody College 

Burton Cooper, B.A., Th.D. 
Assistant Professor of Religion 

B.A., Columbia College; Th.D., Union Theological Seminary. 

Judith A. Crissman, B.A., Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

B.A., Thiel College; Ph.D., University of North Carolina. 
Martha Gene Darby, B.A. , M.A. 
Assistant Professor of Health, Physical Education and Recreation 

B.A., Butler University; M.A., New York University. 

Daniel A. Dervin, B.S., M. A., Ph.D. 

A s sis tan t Professor of English j gy 

B.S.,Creighton University; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University. 



Ricardo Dobson, A.B., M. A., Ph.D. DIRECTORY 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 

A.B., New York University; M.A., Ph.D., Arizona State 
University. 

Victor A. Fingerhut, B.A. , M.A. 
Assistant Professor of Economics and Political Science 
B.A., M.A., Yale University. 

Ruth T. Friedman, B.S., Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of Biology 

B.S., Ph.D., Medical College of Virginia. 

Janet M. Gardner, B.S., M.A. 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., St. Francis College; M.A., Duquesne University. 

John Kirk George, A.B., M.S. 
Assistant Professor of Chemistry 

A.B., Columbia College; M.S., University of Connecticut. 




200 



James B. Gouger, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of Geography and Geology 

B.A., Montclair State College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Florida. 

Susan J. Hanna,B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., Ohio State University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Michigan. 
Ruby C. Harris, B.S., M.Ed. 
Assistant Professor of Home Economics 

B.S., Mary Washington College; M.Ed., University of Virginia. 
Mathew Herban, III, B.A., A.M. 
Assistant Professor of Art 

B.A., American University; A.M., Boston University. 

Joseph E. Holmes, B.S., M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Education 

B.S., M.S., State University of New York at New Paltz. 

Catherine Howell Hook, B.S., M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Education 

B.S., Madison College; M.S., University of Virginia. 

Ayako Imai, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Art 
B.A., Tsuda Women's College; M.A., Ph.D., Columbia University. 

DIRECTORY Mildred Cates Jamison, B.S., M.S. 

Assistant Professor of Home Economics 

B.S., East Tennessee State College; M.S., University of Tennessee. 
Robert B. Jessen, A.B. 
Assistant Professor of Sociology 

A.B., Union College. 

Lafayette Jackson Jones, B.S., M.A.T. 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., United States Naval Academy; M.A.T., Duke University. 

Lucile Cox Jones, A.B., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Classics 

A.B., Sweet Briar College; M.A., University of Virginia; Roman Civiliza- 
tion Certificate, American Academy in Rome, Italy; Greek Civilization. 
Certificate, American School of Classical Studies, Athens. 

Bernard N. Klenke, B.S. 

Assistant Professor of History 

B.S., Georgetown University; Adenauer Fellowship, Federal Republic of 
Western Germany. 

John L. Lamph, A. A., B.A., M.F.A. 

Assistant Professor of Art 

A. A., Fullerton Junior College; B.A., California State College at Fullerton; 
M.F.A. , Claremont Graduate School, Claremont. 



Bruce David MacEwen, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.A., LaVerne College; M.A., University of California at Los Angeles; 

Ph.D., Arizona State University. 

John C. Manolis, B.A., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of Modern Foreign Languages 

B.A., Assumption University; M.A., Florida State University. 

Alexander Nakoi, B.A. (Religion), B. A. (German), M.A. , Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of Modern Foreign Languages 

B.A. (Religion), University of Munich; B.A. (German), University of 

Vienna; M.A. , Ph.D., University of Vienna. 

Mary Kaye Phifer, B.S., M.A. 
Assistant Professor of Psychology 

B.S., Belmont College; M.A., George Peabody College for Teachers. 

Patricia J. Pierce, B.A., M.S. 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.A., University of Colorado; M.S., Oregon State University. 

Mary Warren Pinschmidt, A.B., A.M. 

Assistant Professor of Biology 

A.B., Western Maryland College; A.M., Duke University. 

Alice Brand Rabson, A.B., M.S., Ph.D. 



A ssistan t Professor of Psychology DI RECTO R Y 

A.B., Cornell University; M.S., Ph.D., Purdue University. 
Key Sun Ryang, B.A. , M.A., 

Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., Trinity University; M.A., Columbia University. 

Richard L. Sarchet, B.S., M.S. 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., Southwestern State College, Oklahoma; M.S., Oklahoma State 

University. 

Robert Miller Saunders, B.A. , M.A. , Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., M.A., University of Richmond; Ph.D., University of Virginia. 
Edward F. Shaughnessy, Jr., B.S., Ed.M., M.A. 
Assistant Professor of Education 

B.S., Boston College; Ed.M., Boston State College; M.A., Northeastern 

University. 

Dudley A. Sherwood, B.S., B.A., M.A. 
Assistant Professor of Classics 

B.S., Purdue University; B.A., M.A., University of Toronto. 

Raman K. Singh, B.A., M.A. 
Assistant Professor of English 

B.A., St. Stephen's College; M.A., Western Michigan University. 



Peter V. Snyder, B.A., M.A., M.A., Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of Philosophy 

B.A., M.A., Bowling Green University; M. A., University of Massachusetts; 
Ph.D., (four college consortium)— Amherst, Mt. Holyoke, Smith, and the 
University of Massachusetts. 

Arthur L. Tracy, B.A., M.A. 

Assistant Professor of History 

B.A., Barrington College, M.A., The American University. 

Thomas S. Turgeon, B.A., D.F.A. 
Assistant Professor of Dramatic Arts and Speech 
B.A., Amherst College; D.F.A. , Yale University. 

Richard Crist Turner, Jr., S.B., S.M. 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

S.B., S.M., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
Alexander Kelly Tyree, B.S., M.A.T. 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., U.S. Naval Academy; M.A.T. , Duke University. 

Richard Hyde Warner, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 
Assistant Professor of History 

A. B., Dartmouth College; M.A., Ph.D., New York University. 
Roy B. Weinstock, B.A., M. A., Ph.D. 

Assistant Professor of Psychology 

r)TT? ECTOR Y B.A., Brooklyn College; M.A., Hollins College; Ph.D., Syracuse Uni- 

versity. 

Richard M. Zeleznock, B.S., M.A. 
Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

B.S., California State College; M.A., Rutgers University. 



202 



****** 





Instructors 

John M. Albertine, A.B., Ph.D. 
Instructor in Economics and Political Science 
A.B., King's College; Ph.D., University of Virginia. 

Michael L. Bass, A. A., B.S., M.S. 
Instructor in Biology 

A. A., Clinch Valley College; B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute; M.S., 

Medical College of Virginia. 

Otho C. Campbell, B.A., M.A. 
Instructor in History 

B.A., Richmond College; M.A., The American University. 
Anne B. Capelle 
Instructor in Modern Foreign Languages 

Licence d' Anglais, University of Caen. 

Theodore Celenko Jr., B. A., M.A. 
Instructor in Art 

B.A., Rutgers University; M.A., Florida State University 

Jeanne DeLay Chalifoux 
Instructor in Music 

Graduate, Curtis Institute of Music. ^n? 

Madeline Cohen, B. A., M.A. 

Instructor in Art DIRECTORY 

B.A., Brooklyn College; M.A., University of Pennsylvania. 
Clotilde Dagnino, B.A., M.A., 
Instructor in Modern Foreign Languages 

B.A., Ancelle College, Palermo; M.A., University of Palermo. 
FrancesLinda deFlorio, B.A., M.A. 
Instructor in Modern Foreign Languages 

B.A., Smith College; M.A., Mount Holyoke College. 
Sonja Dragomanovic 
Instructor in Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 

Professional Dance Certificate, Zagreb State Opera Ballet School, Yogosla- 

via; diploma (dance and choreography), Meister Staten Fur Tranz, Berlin, 

Germany; study at Mozarteum Conservatory of Music, Salzburg, Austria. 

John Druzbick, B.S. 
Instructor in Physics 

B.S., Roanoke College. 
Margaret Sue Early, B.A., M.A. 
Instructor in English 

B.A., Vanderbilt University; M.A., Duke University. 
Peter A. Fellowes, B.A., M.A. 
Instructor in English 

B. A., Colgate University; M.A., Johns Hopkins University. 



Martha E. Fickett, B.A., M.M. 
Instructor in Music 

B.A., Mary Washington College; M.M., University of Michigan. 

Joyce Wheeler Gardner, B.S. 

Instructor in Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 

B.S., Juilliard School of Music; student: Jacob's Pillow University of the 
Dance, Columbia University; Advanced study: University of Wisconsin, 
University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. 

♦Richard E. Hansen, B.A., A.M. 
Instructor in English 

B.A., A.M., Duke University. 
Janet M. Hollack, B.S., M.S. 
Instructor in Health, Physical Education and Recreation 

B.S., Slippery Rock State College; M.S., Michigan State University. 

Mary Jane Hyde, A. A., B.A., M.A. 

Instructor in Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 
A. A., Christian College; B.A., M.A., University of Kentucky. 

Constance Anne Jones, B.A., M.A.T. 
Instructor in Sociology 
j~j B.A., M.A.T., Vanderbilt University. 

Carol Ann Kemmler, B.S., M.S. 

DIRECTORY Instructor in Mathematics 

B.S., M.S., University of Rhode Island. 
Harold Anton Michael Kirschner 
Instructor in Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 

Graduate of Officers' Training School, Copenhagen, Denmark. 
Joanna M. Looney, A.B., M.A. 
Instructor in Modern Foreign Languages 

A.B., Wesleyan College; M.A., Duke University. 

Carlton R. Lutterbie, Jr., B.S., M.A. 
Instructor in English 

B.S., Northwestern University; M.A., University of Chicago. 
Ainslie Armstrong McLees, B.A. M.A. 
Instructor in Modern Foreign Languages 

B.A., Ursinus College; M.A., Bryn Mawr Graduate School 

Taketo Ohtani, A. A., B.A., M.A. 

Instructor in Modern Foreign Languages 

A. A., Hiwassee College; B.A., Scarritt College; M.A., Scarritt College. 

Leslie Edwin Pitts, B.A. 
Instructor in Physics 

B.A., Kalamazoo College 

*On leave 1969-70. 



Roberta A. Rankin, B.A., M.A. 
Instructor in English 

B.A., M.A., University of Florida. 

William T. Ross, B.A., M.A. 

Instructor in English 

B.A., Memphis State University; M.A., University of Virginia 

Yvonne M. Sabine, B.A. 
Instructor in Music 

B.A., American University. 

ASTRID SCHNELLER, B.A., M.A. 

Instructor in Modern Foreign Languages 

B.A., Temple University; M.A., University of North Carolina. 
Jaime Sendra, B.S., M.A. 
Instructor in Modern Foreign Languages 

B.S., University of Richmond; M.A., Middlebury College. 

Janet M. Whisler, B.A. , M.A. 
Instructor in Economics 

B.A., M.A., University of Iowa. 

Richard T. Wilfong, B.S., M.S. 
Instructor in Biology 

B.S., College of William and Mary; M.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute. y^ 

Elizabeth Winston, B.A., M.A. 

Instructor in English DIRECTORY 

B.A., Vanderbilt University; M.A., University of Wisconsin. 
Mary Elizabeth Wright, B.A., M.A. 
Instructor in Dramatic Arts and Speech 

B.A., Mary Washington College; M.A., Northwestern University. 



Assistant Instructors 

Nancy Cole Dosch, B.S. 

Assistant Instructor in Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 

B.S., University of Maryland. 
Lydie S. Mann 
Assistant Instructor in Modern Foreign Languages 

Baccalaureat, Lycee Georgesville, Paris; diploma, Institut de Phonetique, 

University of Paris. 

Joan Rivera Robbins, B.S. 
Assistant Instructor in Modern Foreign Languages 
B.S., Radford College. 

Mary Jane Sotzing, A. A., B.A. 
Assistant Instructor in Chemistry 

A. A., Warren Wilson College; B.A., Berea College. 



Visiting Lecturers 

Christa Altenstetter, A.B., M.A., Ph.D. 

Visiting Lecturer in Economics and Political Science 

A.B., University of Heidelberg; M.A., Duke University; Ph.D., University 
of Heidelberg. 

TeruoHara, B.A., M.A. 
Visiting Artist 

B.A., M.A., Tokyo Kyoiko University, Japan. 
Richard J. Krickus, B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 

Visiting Lecturer in Economics and Political Science 
B.A., College of William and Mary; M.A., University of Massachusetts; 
Ph.D., Georgetown University. 

Murat Willis Williams, B.A., B.A. (Oxon.) , M.A. (Oxon.) 
Visiting Lecturer in Political Economy 

B.A., University of Virginia; B.A., M.A., Oxford University. 



206 



DIRECTORY 




Alumnae Association 

Mary Washington College has a large and active Alumnae 
Association with members living in all parts of the United States 
and in foreign countries. Any graduate of the College or any 
student who has been regularly registered at the College for a 
minimum of two semesters is a member of the Association. 
Many of the alumnae have achieved distinction in the fields 
of art, music, literature, business, social work, education, and 
politics. 

The primary goal of the Association is to assist the College 
in the development and expansion of its institutional program and 
facilities, and to promote the educational philosophy of the 
College. The Association aims also to develop and strengthen the 
bonds of interest existing between the College and its alumnae 
and among the alumnae themselves. 

The Alumnae House, "Spotswood," is across College Avenue 
from the western gates to the campus. 

Officers 

Kathy Friedman Levinson '63 Chairman of the Board 

(Mrs. Stuart A.) 

803 Hepler Road, Richmond, Virginia 23229 DIRECTORY 

Ruby York Weinbrecht '48 First Vice Chairman 

(Mrs. Standau E.) 

8107 Touchstone Terrace, McLean, Virginia 22101 

Judith Townsend Gatlin '58 Second Vice Chairman 

(Mrs. H. Leon, III) 

743 Harwyn Drive, Charlotte, North Carolina (28205) 

Olivia Wheeler McCallum '36 Third Vice Chairman 

(Mrs. Charles F.) 

9917 River Road, Newport News, Virginia 23601 

Mary Ellen Stephenson Faculty Representative 

Professor of Modern Foreign Languages 
Box 1238, College Station, Fredericksburg, Virginia 22401 

Anne L. Perinchief '67 Director of Alumnae Affairs 

Box 1315, College Station, Fredericksburg, Virginia 22401 

Mr. Michael Houston Liaison for Alumnae Affairs 

Assistant to the Chancellor 
Box 3575, College Station, Fredericksburg, Virginia 22401 



207 



DEGREES CONFERRED 

June, 1969 

Bachelor of Arts 

With Honors in Classics 
Helen Maria Caldwell Glen Head, L. I., N. Y, 

With Honors in English 
Alice Berry Clagett Upper Marlboro, Md. 

Karen Lee Kilgore Annandale, Va. 

Janet Carol Kling Dunellen, N. J. 

Linda Susanne Mills Aberdeen, Md. 

Melinda Helen Wilson Vienna, Va. 

With Honors in French 
Evelyn FitzSimons Rowe Richmond, Va. 

Toni Sue Turner Poquoson, Va. 

With Honors in German 

Su^n Carol Honegger Charlotte, N. C. 

With Honors in Music 
Julia Ann Griffin Alexandria, Va. 

Jo Ann Haden Charlottesville, Va. 

DIRECTORY Sylvia Lee Martin Bassett, Va. 

With Honors in Political Science 
Clare Ann Burke Wilmington, Del. 

With Honors in Psychology 

Dancy Dudley Cowan Linden, Va. 

With Honors in Spanish 
Mary Elizabeth Kidd Arlington, Va. 

Bachelor of Arts 



208 



Carol Margaret Abell 


Falls Church, Va. 


Patricia Ann Adair 


Springfield, Va. 


Betty Jean Albright 


Danville, Va. 


Catherine Stone Allen 


Great Falls, Va. 


Carole Lee Althaus 


Newport News, Va. 


Judith Nan Anker 


Newport News, Va. 


Deborah Joyce Ansell 


Norfolk, Va. 


Lynn Dee Armstrong 


Chester, Va. 


Mary Verlinda Auth 


Arlington, Va. 


{Catherine Nicolette Badran 


Norfolk, Va. 


Sudie Bonner Bagley 


Kenbridge, Va. 


Annie Elizabeth Bailey 


Goodlettsville, Tenn 


Anne Read Ball 


Norfolk, Va. 



Elizabeth Vernon Ball 
Phyllis Ann Bareford 
Jane Kay Barnes 
Tacey Louise Battley 
Carolyn Anne Bauer 
Kathleen Bell 
Carolyn Ann Bender 
Caroline Triplett Bettwy 
Barbara Parmelee Black 
Mary Anne Bolish 
Dianne Kay Bona 
Stephanie Diane Boone 
Mary Robertson Boulware 
Lucy Anne Bowles 
Virginia Yates Bradford 
Leigh Richardson Breeden 
Kathleen Ann Bridget 
Geraldyne Benton Britt 
Nancy Bowen Brittle 
Margaret Yorke Brizendine 
Billie Louise Brockwell 
Lucille Inscoe Brooks 
Nancy Louise Brouse 
Beverly May Brown 
Caryl Elaine Brown 
Doris Eileen Brown 
Sharon Browning 
Evelyn S. Brunner 
Evelyn Hoyt Burks 
Barbara Ann Burt 
Barbara Jean Burton 
Linda Louise Burton 
Mary Hannah Bush 
Janet May Byers 
Katherine Lynn Caffee 
Peggy Ann Callen 
Susan Callin 
Patricia May Callis 
MaryJeanMonohonCampbell 
Maria Sol Canizares 
Donna Marie Cannon 
Joyce Ann Carmines 
Janis Cash 

Ann Louise Chatterton 
Beverly Barnes Chewning 



Glen Allen, Va. 
Tappahannock, Va. 
Suffolk, Va. 
Arlington, Va. 
Elkton, Md. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Fairfax, Va. 
Fairfax, Va. 
Luray, Va. 
Vienna, Va. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Lexington, Va. 
Charlottesville, Va. 
Danville, Va. 
Flint Hill, Va. 

Raleigh, N.C. 
Arlington, Va. 
West Point, N. Y. 
Remington, Va. 
Roanoke, Va. 
Hopewell, Va. 
Fredericksburg, Va. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Arlington, Va. 
Petersburg, Va. 
Fredericksburg, Va. 
Vienna, Va. 
Rocky Mount, Va. 
Chester, Va. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Swoope, Va. 
Waynesboro, Va. 
Portsmouth, Va. 
Quantico, Va. 
Rochester, N. Y. 
Bon Air, Va. 
Martinsville, Va. 
Arlington, Va. 
Wilmington, Del. 
Hampton, Va. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Virginia Beach, Va. 
Charlottesville, Va. 



209 



DIRECTORY 



210 



DIRECTORY 



Barbara Elizabeth Churney 
Anne Copeland Clark 
Mary Linda Clark 
Suzanne Claire Clark 
Constance Abbey Cline 
Dianne Johnson Clover 
Susan Williams Cluff 
Alice Dare Cogswell 
Christine Blair Cole 
Carolyn Gregory Collins 
Mariam Grace Colwell 
Susan Ann Connolly 
Janet Rose Cooper 
Margaret Gannaway Cornick 
Carole Trent Costley 
Patricia Louise Cox 
Dorothy Ann Craft 
Mary Ann Crandall 
Betsy Harris Crews 
Barbara Anne Crickenberger 
Helen Virginia Cross 
Juliana Conway Daffron 
Amy Jo Danforth 
Valerie Ann Dannehl 
Martha Jane Davis 
Marianne DeBlois 
Virginia Lee Dize 
Sharon Ann Dobie 
Sandra Carol Dodson 
Sherill Elizabeth Doran 
Pamela Louise Dow 
Elizabeth Carlyle Dudley 
Linda Diane Duffy 
Sharry White DuVal 
Karen Scott Dyer 
Linda Marie Eadie 
Betty Lou Earles 
Susan Sawyer Edmonson 
Carole Serine Einarsen 
Evelyn Marie Eliot 
Pauline Dixon Elkins 
Linda Diane Ellis 
Elizabeth Harrison Elmore 
Barbara Ann Bingham Esbach 



Fairfax, Va. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Manassas, Va. 
Annandale, Va. 
Falmouth, Va. 
Woodford, Va. 
Fredericksburg, Va. 
Sterling, Va. 
Warren, Ohio 
Arlington, Va. 
Old Tappan, N. J. 
Little Silver, N. J. 
Rocky Mount, Va. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Cranford, N. J. 
Tampa, Fla. 
South Boston, Va. 
Falls Church, Va. 
Lafayette Hill, Pa. 
Chester, Va. 
Virginia Beach, Va. 
Fredericksburg, Va. 
Virginia Beach, Va. 
Falls Church, Va. 
Tangier, Va. 
McLean, Va. 
Goldvein, Va. 
Falls Church, Va. 
Augusta, Me. 
Hampton, Va. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Petersburg, Va. 
South Boston, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 
Danville, Va. 
Hampton, Va. 
Harrisonburg, Va. 
Arlington, Va. 
Martinsville, Va. 
Richmond Va. 
Bon Air, Va. 
Richmond Va. 



Anne Rowan Evans 
Lesley Jane Fanning 
Linda Lee Ferrell 
Paula Ann Fine 
Sharon Walters Fleming 
Joan Margaret Fletcher 
Susan Ellen Forbes 
Darriel Webster Fulks 
Elisabeth Carlisle Fuqua 
Janet Louise Gallaher 
Linda Love Gattis 
Susan Mays Gentry 
Marie Theresa Gerish 
Christina Anne Getlein 
Perry Aldridge Gibson 
Joan Ann Gillis 
Sheila Joan Gilmore 
Kate Huntington Ginman 
Nancy Lynn Gleason 
Viola Marie Graves 
Barbara deWolf Gray 
Susan Ellen Greco 
Charlotte Lipscomb Green 
Barbara Ellen Greenlief 
Carol Ann Greenwood 
Karen Esther Gruggel 
Helen Sherrill Gulledge 
Michele Lynne Gunderson 
Patricia Anne Gwaltney 
Sidney Louise Hall 
Frances Kremer Halupka 
Cary Loving Hamilton 
Mary Kathleen Hanagan 
Pamela Jean Hancock 
Nell LaVerne Hanks 
Linda Jean Hanna 
Patricia Ellen Hannoosh 
Iris Faye Harrell 
Sharon Kay Harrell 
Laura Eugenia Harris 
Elizabeth Minter Haynie 
Ingrid Hedrick 
Carol Adele Hewitt 
Sandra Anne Hewitt 



Chester, Va. 
Lynchburg, Va. 
Roanoke, Va. 
Fairfax, Va. 
Fredericksburg, Va. 
Falls Church, Va. 
Roanoke, Va. 
DePere, Wise. 
Richmond, Va. 
Lynchburg, Va. 
Charlotte, N. C. 
Crozet, Va. 
Fairfax, Va. 
Arlington, Va. 
Triangle, Va. 
Springfield, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 
Richmond, Ind. 
Waynesboro, Va. 
Stafford, Va. 
Charlottesville, Va. 
West Hartford, Conn. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Arlington, Va. 
Vernon Hill, Va. 
Portsmouth, Va. 
Roanoke, Va. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 
Hopewell, Va. 
Annandale, Va. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Fairfax, Va. 
Danville, Va. 
Manlius, N. Y. 
Annandale, Va. 
Virginia Beach, Va. 
Chesapeake, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 
Kilmarnock, Va. 
Beckley, West Va. 
Falls Church, Va. 
Alexandria, Va. 



211 



DIRECTORY 



212 



DIRECTORY 



Kathleen Emma Hill 
Sharon Candace Hilldrup 
Patricia Giles Hinds 
Diane Lynn Hoffman 
Pamela Lee Hogan 
Mary Elizabeth Holbein 
Gloria Jean Holland 
Beverly Janice Holt 
Pamela Mary Hopkins 
Barbara Carol Hopta 
Diana Lynn Horst 
Carole Faye Hosey 
Anne Margaret Hoskot 
Margaret Aston Howard 
Linda Lee Howell 
Anna L. Howerton 
Franceen Huddleston 
Rebecca Ann Hurrell 
Linda Mary Irby 
Jane Ellen Jackson 
Judith Anne Jackson 
Frances E. Jessee 
Carol Frances Johnson 
Carol Lee Johnson 
Karen Ellis Johnson 
Laura Terissa Johnson 
Linda Diane Johnson 
Karen Anne Jones 
Ruth Anne Jones 
Mary Dean Kellam 
Brenda Gayle Kelley 
Jean Elizabeth Kelley 
Cynthia Carr Kelly 
Tinet E. Klaveness 
Carolyn Lee Klotz 
Priscilla Lyn Koons 
Catherine Amanda Koster 
Carolyn Jacobs Kreiter 
Ann Marie Kucinski 
Ann Vickie Lasko 
Jean LeMasurier 
Janet Elizabeth Leonard 
Nancy Leigh Leonard 
Ellen Josephine Liberti 



Richmond, Va. 
Fredericksburg, Va. 
Roanoke, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 
Laurel Bay, S. C. 
Portsmouth, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 
Virginia Beach, Va. 
Lettsdale, Pa. 
Landisville, Pa. 
Woodbridge, Va. 
Arlington, Va. 
Lebanon, Va. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Lynchburg, Va. 
Largo, Fla. 
Martinsville, Va. 
Oakton, Va. 
Bristol, Va. 
Jacksonville, Fla. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 
Annandale, Va. 
Fairfax, Va. 
Franklin, Va. 
Annandale, Va. 
Charlottesville, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 
Sandston, Va. 
Crewe, Va. 
Virginia Beach, Va. 
Fairfax, Va. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Annandale, Va. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Luray, Va. 
Sandston, Va. 
Rutherford, N. J. 
Arlington, Va. 
Fairfax, Va. 
Nashau, N. H. 
Decatur, Ala. 
Alexandria, Va. 



Katherine Webster Liggett 
Erie Marie Lingerfelt 
Elizabeth Odom Loughram 
Ingrid Clara Lourenco 
Cynthia Anne Lowdermilk 
Emily Peebles Ludwig 
Julie Mae Lundeen 
Carol Frances Lupton 
Edith Ann McAnelly 
Susanne Elsbeth McCarthy 
Judith Anne McCartney 
Susan Louise McCauley 
Susan Lee McCrory 
Katherine Ann McKiernan 
Laurie Bennett McLearen 
Linda Jean McNaughton 
Jon Webster MacDonough 
Barbara Brent Macon 
Marilyn Louise Maeder 
Barbara Jean Mangels 
Judy Marie Mansfield 
Maureen Doris Maran 
Linda Macaulay Marett 
Jean Whitten Mason 
Betty Lou Matthews 
Marcia Sue Mayhue 
Linda Louise Medica 
Catherine Alice Meehan 
Mary Kathryn Meyers 
Diane Demong Miller 
Kathleen Ann Milliken 
Cheri Lynn Modesitt 
Patricia Marie Morris 
Joan Kathleen Mueller 
Debra Hollibaugh Myers 
Lucinda Davis Myers 
Joan Ellis Mysiak 
Dixie Lee Nelson 
Greta G. Nelson 
Phyllis Lee Newby 
Jane Elizabeth Nicholls 
Barbara Ridgely Nichols 
Margaret Ellen Noll 
Vickie Jean Null 



Birmingham, Ala. 
Richmond, Va. 
Sandston, Va. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Clarksville, Va. 
Chambersburg, Pa. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Louisa, Va. 
Fredericksburg, Va. 
East Longmeadow, Mass. 
Roanoke, Va. 
Vienna, Va. 
Fredonia, Kans. 
Silver Spring, Md. 
Madison, Va. 
Annandale, Va. 
Prince George, Va. 
Atlanta, Ga. 
Erie, Pa. 
Maylan, Pa. 
Falls Church, Va. 
Bridgehampton, N. Y. 
Seneca, S. C. 
Lynchburg, Va. 
Brodnax, Va. 
Hampton, Va. 
Northfield, N. J. 
Arlington, Va. 
Johnstown, Pa. 
Falls Church, Va. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Fredericksburg, Va. 
Amherst, Va. 
Cranford, N. J. 
Cheasapeake, Va. 
Middlebury, Conn. 
South Boston, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 
Newport News, Va. 
Fairfax, Va. 
Roanoke, Va. 



213 



DIRECTORY 



214 



DIRECTORY 



Betty Smith Olander 
Barbara Louise Orender 
Nancy Lynne Parker 
Jane Patch 

Kathleen Elizabeth Perkins 
Constance Eleanor Perry 
Joan Kaye Pervier 
Carrington Hannah Petras 
Donna Sue Pharr 
Lynn Marie Pierce 
Terrell Lou Pinkard 
Jean Marie Polk 
Vivian Anne Porter 
Pamela Ann Powell 
Nancy Ellen Powers 
Ann Lee Preddy 
Elda Ann Prudden 
Diane Marr Pugh 
Janis Ruth Purdy 
Susan Smiley Quinn 
Nancy Caryl Raisor 
Elizabeth Jane Rampe 
Ann Hugh Douglas Randolph 
Cheryl Ann Rayburn 
Kaye Aurich Reynolds 
Jacqueline Rose Richards 
Barbara Henderson Riordan 
Louise Ann Robertson 
Pamela Rodriguez 
Cora Walton Rogers 
Pamela Helene Ross 
Marjorie Ellen Roszmann 
Nina Florence Rountree 
Kathleen Lynn Rowan 
Marjorie Jeanne Rowand 
Mary Eleanor Rozanski 
Judy Bennett Russell 
Kimberly Ann Sample 
Martha Judith Sandman 
Linda Lee Saunders 
Nancy Alice Schell 
Marianne Radich Schuman 
Judith Louise Searcy 
Carol Ann Seaton 



Scarsdale, N. Y. 

Roanoke, Va. 

Portsmouth, Va. 

Springfield, Va. 

Woodbridge, Va. 

Vienna, Va. 

Hampton, Va. 

Arlington, Va. 

Hampton, Va. 

Vienna, Va. 

Martinsville, Va. 

Alexandria, Va. 

Montgomery, Ala. 

Falls Church, Va. 

Newport News, Va. 

Hampton, Va. 

McLean, Va. 

Galesferry, Conn. 

Annapolis, Md. 

Charlottesville, Va. 

Washington, D. C. 

Cleveland Heights, Ohio 

Brodnax, Va. 

Falls Church, Va. 

Troutville, Va. 

Petersburg, Va. 

Fort Leavenworth, Kans. 

Petersburg, Va. 

Langeloth, Pa. 

Clifton Forge, Va. 

Colonial Heights, Va. 

Washington Court House, Va. 

Portsmouth, Va. 

Fairfax, Va. 

Manassas, Va. 

Byram, Conn. 

Quantico, Va. 

Charlottesville, Va. 

Annandale, Va. 

Charlottesville, Va. 

Vienna, Va. 

Hillside, N. J. 

Arlington, Va. 

Richmond, Va. 



Susan Balee Seay 
Pamela Joyce Selden 
Christina May Sheane 
Judith Irene Shearer 
Gloria Jean Shelton 
Kathleen Winston Shepherd 
Elizabeth Jo Shoemaker 
Ruth Ann Sichol 
Roberta Ann Simpson 
Suzanne Sivets 
Betty Burnley Smith 
Brenda Hunt Smith 
Cecelia Smith 
Frances David Smith 
Carolyn Elvira Smoak 
Regina Ann Sneed 
Jacqueline Leigh Spencer 
Maura Ann Stanard 
Kathleen Cornelia Stanton 
Claudia Rawls Stell 
Joan Wesley Stephens 
Nancy Louise Stevenson 
Elizabeth Caldwell Stewart 
Arena Hunter Stone 
Nancy Jean Strickler 
Eleanor Dunn Sweatt 
Alyce Jo Sydenstricker 
Deloris Dianne Taylor 
Linda Mabel Taylor 
Sally Jane Taylor 
Sharon Lynne Taylor 
Myra Dodson Terry 
Teri Anne Thibodeaux 
Joan Frances Thomas 
Joan Marie Thomas 
Patricia Ann Thomas 
Patricia Thompson 
Patricia Anne Tietjen 
Alicia Margaret Tilton 
Linda Elayne Toombs 
Linda Carol Trinko 
Mary Patricia Tull 
Norma Jean Turberville 
Susan Conley Turner 



Hopewell, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 
New Canaan, Conn. 
York, Pa. 
Halifax, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 
Farnham, Va. 
Falls Church, Va. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Warsaw, Va. 
Manassas, Va. 
Catawba, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Vienna, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 
Gates Mills, Ohio 
Alexandria, Va. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 
Falls Church, Va. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Charlottesville, Va. 
Falls Church, Va. 
Mt. Pleasant, S. C. 
Roanoke, Va. 
Stuart, Va. 
Newport News, Va. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Fredericksburg, Va. 
Newport News, Va. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Manassas, Va. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Suffolk, Va. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Arlington, Va. 
Levittown, L. I., N. Y. 
Fredericksburg, Va. 
Roanoke, Va. 
Newport News, Va. 
Virginia Beach, Va. 
Roanoke, Va. 



215 



DIRECTORY 



216 



DIRECTORY 



Alberta Virginia Thomas Utz 
Christina Virginia Varian 
Nancy Lee Wahlig 
Kerry Jane Walsh 
Teresa Elaine Wansboro 
Sharon Atkins Washington 
Linda Carole Watkins 
Bonnie Lee Watson 
Elizabeth Lathrop Watters 
Patricia Kay Weller 
Joan Westerkamp 
Virginia Mary Wheaton 
Mary Joy White 
Nancy Walton Whited 
Claudia Margaret Wiczus 
Martha Harvey Wilbourne 
Mary Page Williams 
Susan Gale Williams 
Patricia Ann Williamson 
Karen Gail Wine 
Elizabeth Dale Winn 
Anne Deering Witham 
Ruth Leigh Woody 
Eleanor Jane Woollard 
Judith Harrison Wrenn 
Carol Anne Wymer 
Sarah Farrar Yancey 
Nancy Evelyn Yeager 
Jeanine Marie Zavrel 



Lancaster, Va. 
Teaneck, N. J. 
Norfolk, Va. 
McLean, Va. 
Augusta, Ga. 
Fredericksburg, Va. 
Lebanon, Va. 
Hampton, Va. 
Falls Church, Va. 
Hampton, Va. 
McLean, Va. 
Mathews, Va. 
Yardley, Pa. 
Front Royal, Va. 
Falls Church, Va. 
Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Marion, Va. 
Roanoke, Va. 
Falls Church, Va. 
Triangle, Va. 
Blackstone, Va. 
Virginia Beach, Va. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Portsmouth, Va. 
Emporia, Va. 
Luray, Va. 
Crozet, Va. 
Falls Church, Va. 



Falls Church, Va. 
Bachelor of Science 

With Honors in Biology 

Julia Anne Eidemiller Fredericksburg, Va. 

With Honors in Chemistry 
Marilyn Leah Shull Rock Hill, S. C. 

Susan Jeanne Webster Springfield, Va. 

With Honors in Physics 
Patricia Mae Boise Westport, Conn. 

Miriam Elaine Drayer Waynesboro, Va. 

Jane Vaughan Robinson Port Royal, Va. 

With Honors in Psychology 
Mary Evelyn Grant College Park, Ga. 



BACHELOR OF SCIENCE 



Nancy Faye Andrews 
Eloise Sykes Bell 
Margaret Ann Denny Bowman 
JulanneJane Brandes 
Ellen Ruth Brown 
Frances Neville Buck 
Linda Elizabeth Carson 
Barbara Shirley Claytor 
Carole Jeanne Clear 
Sarah Fontaine Cooke 
Christopher Clark Cooper 
Cynthia Elizabeth Dunkum 
Kay Howard Evans 
Judith Ann Farrell 
Glenna Elizabeth Ferguson 
Helen Elizabeth Ferguson 
Vera Marguerite Flanter 
Peggy Moore Freeman 
Mary Eleanor Stuart Gibson 
Pamela Winn Gooch 
Carrol Adair Gury 
Christiana Delores Hall 
Linda Louise Hawkins 
Maureen Elizabeth Heffernan 
Cynthia Beryl Hicks 
Jenifer Jane Higgins 
Judith Ann Higgins 
Bertha Constance Hinson 
Helen Schepers Holzgrefe 
Linda Lee Huff 
Linda Kathleen Johnson 
Susan Jean Labrenz 
Karen Parker Lears 
Elizabeth Anne McCorkle 
Ellen Elizabeth McGhee 
Norma Jean McNair 
Barbara Marks 
Toni Rerrie Masser 
Betty Wade Miles 
Jean Lonnelle Mongole 
Deborah Jeanne Morrison 
Joyce Lee Munden 



Tappahannock, Va. 
Palmyra, Va. 
Front Royal, Va. 
Fredericksburg, Va. 
Hampton, Va. 
Covington, Va. 
Arlington, Va. 
Lynchburg, Va. 
Chincoteague, Va. 
Fredericksburg, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 
Gordonsville, Va. 
Lynchburg, Va. 
McLean, Va. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 
Sarasota, Fla. 
Dahlgren, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 
Troy, Va. 

Virginia Beach, Va. 
Hopewell, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 
Norwood, N. J. 
Dover, N. J. 
Fredericksburg, Va. 
Fredericksburg, Va. 
Warsaw, Va. 
Richmond, Va. 
Falls Church, Va. 
Clifton, Va. 
Camp Hill, Pa. 
Virginia Beach, Va. 
Harrisonburg, Va. 
Lynchburg, Va. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Falls Church, Va. 
Charlottesville, Va. 
Manassas, Va. 
Falls Church, Va. 
Wilmington, Del. 
Norfolk, Va. 



217 



DIRECTORY 



218 



DIRECTORY 



Shirley Jeanne Myers 
Roberta Ann Newton 
Birdie Jean Nuckols 
Catherine Ellen O'Connor 
Aria Alice Orris 
Charlotte Anne Padgett 
Bonnie Gail Page 
Ann Blanton Payne 
Phyllis Sumner Peterson 
Ann Elizabeth Phillips 
Deborah Porter 



Narrows, Va. 
Fredericksburg, Va. 
Gretna, Va. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Falmouth, Va. 
Bedford, Va. 
Goodlettsville, Tenn. 
Arlington, Va. 
Arlington, Va. 
Arlington, Va. 
Arlington, Va. 



KelleyElizabeth Greene Rauchle Pensacola, Fla. 



Sara Kathryn Rodgers 
Judith Hodges Root 
Brenda Lea Shonk 
Linda Vaughan Smith 
Margaret Ellen Smith 
Stephanie Ina Spritzer 
Linda Carol Steinhoff 
Susan Anita Taylor 
Elizabeth Anne Teasdale 
Linda Elizabeth Thomas 
Anne Towson 
Cheryl Colleen Ulmer 
Lynn Van Campen 
Linda Ann Wells 
Virginia Ann Wemmerus 
Joan Carol Whitaker 
Sue Anne Wilkins 
Anne Conway Williams 
Gail Emond Willis 
Helen Jean Winfrey 



Va. 



Maurentown, Va. 
Fredericksburg, Va. 
McLean, Va. 
Norristown, Pa. 
Norfolk, Va. 
Newport News, 
Malvern, Pa. 
Arlington, Va. 
Alexandria, Va. 
Mineral, Va. 
Lewiston, N. Y. 
Annandale, Va. 
Gibsonia, Pa. 
Farmville, Va. 
Tenafly, N. J. 
Hampton, Va. 
Charlottesville. 
Salem, Va. 
Norfolk, Va. 



Va. 



Richmond, Va. 
Bachelor of Science in Health, 
Physical Education and Recreation 

Patricia Ann Akers Culpeper, Va. 

Elizabeth Ann Oliverio Virginia Beach, Va. 

Susan Peters Schmidt Pottstown, Pa. 

Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology 

Martha Elizabeth Culpepper Roanoke, Va. 
Deanne Frances Dobbs Annandale, Va. 

Linda Gail Sargent Alexandria, Va. 



GEOGRAPHICAL DISTRIBUTION OF STUDENTS 
BY STATES AND COUNTRIES 

Session 1968-69 



Virginia 


1558 


Louisiana 


3 




New Jersey 


121 


Alabama 


2 




Pennsylvania 


96 


Indiana 


2 




Maryland 


80 


Mississippi 


2 




New York 


67 


Oklahoma 


2 




Connecticut 


33 


Kansas 






Massachusetts 


31 


Kentucky 






Delaware 


24 


Minnesota 






Florida 


23 


New Hampshire 






North Carolina 


17 


Wisconsin 






Ohio 


12 


Wyoming 






West Virginia 


12 


Bermuda 






California 


8 


Brazil 






South Carolina 


8 


Canada 






District of Columbia 


7 


Canal Zone 






Rhode Island 


6 


Germany 


2 




Georgia 
Maine 


5 


Ireland 
Malaysia 




219 


5 






Michigan 


5 


The Netherlands 




DIRECTORY 


Tennessee 


5 


Puerto Rico 


2 




Colorado 


4 


Switzerland 






Hawaii 


4 


Thailand 






Illinois 


4 




2,171 




Texas 


4 









220 
INDEX 



Absences 62 

Academic Achievement, Recognition of 68 

Academic Buildings 12 

Academic Costume 35 

Academic Distinction 68 

Academic Information 57 

Academic Probation and Suspension 66 

Academic Regulations 60 

Academic Status of the College 8 

Accommodations and Buildings 12 

Administrative Personnel 185 

Admissions 

Requirements 19 

Scholastic Preparation 19 

Examinations 19 

Character, Personality, and Interests 20 

Health 20 

Committee Review 21 

Advanced Placement and the College-Level Examination Programs 24 

Admission by Advanced Standing 

Admission Requirements 26 

Academic Preparation 26 

Residence Requirements 26 

Direction for Application 26 

Alpha Phi Sigma Award 69 

Alpha Psi Omega Scholarship 36 

Alumnae Association 207 

American Association of University Women 8 

American Studies-Departmental Course Offerings 99 

American Studies-Interdepartmental Major 78 

American Viscose Corporation Scholarship 38 

Amphitheatre 16 

Ann Carter Lee Hall (Student Activities Building) 15 

Anne Fairfax House 15 

Annie Fleming Smith Scholarship Fund 38 

Application Fee 33 

Application for Admission to the College 22 

Art -Departmental Course Offerings 100 

Art Exhibitions 48 

Asian Studies 79 

Assistance, Financial 36 

Astronomy -Departmental Course Offerings 108 

Attendance, Absences, Excuses, and Class Cuts 62 

Audiology and Speech Pathology, Cooperative Program in 93 

Awards 69 

Bachelor of Arts Degree, Requirements for 73 

Bachelor of Arts Degrees Conferred, June, 1969 208 

Bachelor of Science Degree, Requirements for 74 

Bachelor of Science Degrees Conferred, June, 1969 216 

Bachelor of Science in Health, Physical Education, and 

Recreation Degrees Conferred, June, 1969 218 

Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology Degree, Requirements 

for 74 

Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology Degrees Conferred, 

June, 1969 218 

Bachelor of Science in Physical Therapy Degree, Requirements 

for 74 

Band and Orchestra Instruments-Course Offerings 166 

Band, Chorus, and String Ensemble 166 

Bank, Student 35 

Bayly-Tiffany Scholarships 36 

Belmont 15 

Biology-Departmental Course Offerings 108 

Biology Scholarships 36 

Book and Supplies 35 

Bowley Scholarship Fund 37 

Brompton 15 

Buildings and Accommodations 12 



221 



Buildings, Other 15 

Calendar 4 

Carol E. Casto Memorial Scholarship Fund 37 

Chancellor's Alumnae Fund . 37 

Chandler Hall 12 

Chandler Scholarship, The 37 

Change of Schedule or Courses 61 

Character, Personality, and Interests 20 

Chemistry -Departmental Course Offerings Ill 

Chorus 166 

Class Attendance 62 

Class Cuts 62 

Classical Civilization -Course Offerings 116 

Classical Civilization -Interdepartmental Major 79 

Classics -Departmental Course Offerings 113 

Classification as a Virginia Student 32 

Classification of Students 

Freshmen 60 

Sophomores 60 

Juniors 60 

Seniors 60 

Specials 60 

Clubs and Organizations 55 

Colgate W. Darden, Jr. Award 69 

College Scholarship Service 36 

College Theatre 53 

College YWCA 49 

Collegiate Professional Certificate 125 

Combs Science Hall 12 

Concerts 48 

Contents, Table of 3 

Contingent Fee 31 txtt^cv 

Cooperative Programs 11NU.CA 

Cooperative Program in Elementary Education 92 

Cooperative Program in Medical Technology 85 

Cooperative Program in Nursing 89 

Cooperative Program in Speech Pathology and Audiology 93 

Cooperative Programs in Physical Therapy 87 

Counselling and Guidance 52 

Counselling Center 53 

Course (Defined) 60 

Course Numbers and Credits 99 

Course Offerings 97 

Courses, Elective 75 

Credit 35 

Dance-Course Offerings 141 

Dances 48 

Dean's List, The 68 

Deficiencies 64 

Degrees Conferred, June, 1969 208 

Degrees Offered 73 

Denominational Groups 49 

Departmental and Other Clubs 56 

Dining Hall-Seacobeck Hall 16 

Directions for Application 22 

Directions for Applying for Admission with Advanced Standing 26 

Directions for Readmission 25 

Drama Series 47 

Dramatic Arts and Speech -Departmental Course Offerings 117 

duPontHall 13 

E. Lee Trinkle Library 14 

Early Decision Plan 23 

Economics-Course Offerings 120 

Economics and Political Science-Departmental Course Offerings 120 

Education 

Certification Requirements for Grades One through Seven 125 

Certification Requirements for Secondary School Subjects 126 



222 



Education-Departmental Course Offerings 125 

Educational Opportunity Grants 38 

Elective Courses 75 

Elective (Defined) 60 

Elementary Education, Cooperative Program in 92 

Employment 40 

Enforced Withdrawal 67 

English -Departmental Course Offerings 132 

Environment and Location 10 

Events, Other 48 

Excess Hours 61 

Excuses 62 

Faculty Adviser 52 

Faculty Roster 191 

Failures 64 

Fees and Expenses 31 

Fees, Other 35 

Field Trips and Tours 54 

Final Honors 68 

Financial Assistance 

Eligibility and Tenure 36 

Fine Arts Center 12 

First Semester-Calendar 4 

FMC Corporation, American Viscose Division, Award 38 

Foreign Languages 76 

French -Course Offerings 152 

General Information 5 

General Undergraduate Scholarships 38 

George Washington Hall 14 

Geographical Distribution of Students by States and Countries, 

Session of 1969-70 219 



TMHEY Geography and Geology 136 

lJNUC/A Geography -Departmental Course Offerings 136 

Geology -Departmental Course Offerings 138 

German-Departmental Course Offerings 155 

GoolrickHall 14 

Grading 63 

Graduate Study, Preparation for 76 

Graduation, Requirements for 70 

Greek-Course Offerings 114 

Guidance and Counselling 52 

Hatton Lathrop Clark Scholarship 37 

Health Education -Course Offerings 139 

Health, Physical Education, and Recreation-Departmental Course 

Offerings 138 

Health Program 50 

Health Regulations 51 

History -Departmental Course Offerings 144 

History and Literature of Music-Course Offerings 165 

History of Art Major 100 

History of Art -Course Offerings 102 

History (of the College) 8 

Home Economics-Departmental Course Offerings 147 

Honor System, The 45 

Honorary Organizations 55 

Honors Work 68 

Hugh Mercer Infirmary 15 

Individual Instruction in Music 167 

Infirmary -Hugh Mercer 15 

Intermediate and Final Honors 68 

Internship Program for the Preparation of Teachers 95 

Introduction 7 

Italian-Course Offerings 157 

Junior Year Abroad 77 

Kitchenettes and Pressing Rooms 16 

Kiwanis Award 69 

Lalla Gresham Ball Scholarships 36 



223 



Language Houses and Laboratories 54 

Latin-Course Offerings 115 

Latin American Studies 80 

Liberal Arts Seminar 149 

Library, E. Lee Trinkle . 14 

Loans 39 

Location and Environment 10 

Lt. General Albert J. Bowley Scholarship Fund 37 

Major Program 75 

Major Program (Defined) 60 

Marriage 67 

Martin Luther King Memorial Scholarship 38 

Mary Washington College Scholarships 39 

Mathematics-Departmental Course Offerings 149 

Medical Excuses 62 

Medical Specialists, Private Nursing, etc 50 

Medical Technology, Cooperative Program in 85 

MelchersHall 13 

Minnie Rob Phaup Memorial Scholarship 38 

Modern Foreign Languages -Departmental Course Offerings 151 

Monroe Hall 13 

Mortar Board 55 

Mu Phi Epsilon Scholarship 38 

Music -Departmental Course Offerings 163 

National Defense Student Loan Program, The 39 

New Students 34 

Nursing, Cooperative Program in 89 

O.P. Wright Memorial Scholarship Fund 39 

Organizations, Student 55 

Part-Time Students 32 

Payment, Terms of 33 

Philosophy -Departmental Course Offerings 168 T\mrv 

Physical Education-Course Offerings 139 IJNDbA 

Physical Therapy, B.S. Degree in 74 

Physical Therapy -Cooperative Program in .87 

Physics-Departmental Course Offerings 171 

Placement Bureau 53 

Political Economy and Public Affairs -Course Offerings 124 

Political Science-Course Offerings 121 

Political Science and Economics-Departmental Course Offerings 120 

Pollard Hall 13 

Portuguese -Course Offerings 158 

Post Office 16 

Pre-Foreign Service-Interdepartmental Major 81 

Pre-Medical Sciences-Interdepartmental Major 83 

Preparation for Graduate Study 76 

Preparation of Teachers, Internship Program for the 95 

Preparation, Scholastic 19 

Pressing Rooms 16 

Probation 66 

Program of Studies 71 

Psychology -Departmental Course Offerings 174 

Purpose of the College 7 

Quality Point (Defined) 60 

Readmission to the College 25 

Recognition of Academic Achievement 68 

Recreational Association 56 

Refund of Fees 34 

Regulations, Academic 60 

Religion -Departmental Course Offerings 177 

Religious Life 49 

Repeating a Course 65 

Reports, Deficiencies, and Failures 64 

Required Course 60 

Requirements for Graduation 70 

Residence Halls 16 

Residence Requirements 26 



Residential Life 47 

Returning Students 34 

Richard Kirkland Memorial 11 

Riding 140 

Riding Fees 35 

Room Furnishings 16 

Russian -Course Offerings 158 

Russian Studies 84 

Scholarship Quality Points 64 

Scholarships 36 

Scholarships and Loans-Eligibility and Tenure 36 

Scholastic Preparation 19 

Science Hall 12 

Seacobeck Hall 16 

Second Semester-Calendar 4 

Semester Fees and Expenses 

Students Living in Residence Halls 31 

Full-Time Day Students 31 

Off-Campus Teacher Training 31 

Semester Hours 60 

Semester Plan 59 

Seminar, Liberal Arts 149 

Social Life 47 

Sociology-Departmental Course Offerings 179 

Spanish -Course Offerings 159 

Special Services and Opportunities 51 

Speech, Dramatic Arts and-Departmental Course Offerings 117 

Speech Pathology and Audiology, Cooperative Program in 92 

Spotswood House 16 

State Scholarships for Teachers 40 

*£^ Status, Academic 8 

String Ensemble 166 

INDbX Student Activities Building- Ann Carter Lee Hall 15 

Student Bank 35 

Student Employment 40 

Student Government Association 44 

Student Life 

The Student and the College 41 

Student Load 61 

Student Publications 56 

Student Welfare 43 

Studio Art -Course Offerings 100 

Studio Art Major 99 

Summer Session 59 

Supervised Teaching 131 

Suspension 66 

Table of Contents 3 

Teachers, State Scholarships for 40 

Teaching 75 

Terminology 60 

Terms of Payment 33 

Theatre 53 

Theory of Music-Course Offerings 164 

Thomas Howard and Elizabeth Merchant Tardy Endowment Fund, The ... 39 

Thomas Jefferson Cup, The 69 

Transfer of Credits 28 

Trinkle Library 14 

Typewriting 124 

Unit (Defined) 60 

Utility Rooms-Kitchenettes and Pressing Rooms 16 

Virginia Student, Classification as 32 

Visitors 2 

Visitors of the University, The 184 

Voluntary Withdrawal 67 

Welfare, Student 43 

Withdrawal 67 

YWCA 49 




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